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Names of 50 US States with American Accent - American English Pronunciation
 
06:07
Learn how to pronounce the names of all 50 states in the United States of America. Practice pronunciation of most difficult names of US states, such as "Massachusetts," "Connecticut," or "Arkansas." Improve your American accent with the help of phonetic exercise recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Pronunciation exercise: 01:00 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #PronunciationExercises #USStatesNames ► Top 200 Most Common English Words with American Accent: Part 1 https://goo.gl/wnqVI7 ►Top 200 Most Common English Words with American Accent: Part 2 https://goo.gl/Z4uUp5 ► 100 English Homophones with American Accent https://goo.gl/MEyMgK ► Contrasting Vowels: Pronunciation Exercises (playlist) https://goo.gl/T3Jo6u ► Pronunciation of Vowel Sounds (playlist) https://goo.gl/jtRMF9 ► Pronunciation of Consonant Sounds (playlist): https://goo.gl/6uN5vQ Subscribe to Sounds American Channel: https://goo.gl/N4k8Ji [ THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there and welcome to the Sounds American 4th of July special! The 4th of July, or Independence Day, is a big national holiday in the United States. On this day in 1776, thirteen British colonies declared their independence from England. This was the beginning of the US. Several decades later, by 1836, there were 25 states in the USA. Since then, the number of the states has increased to 50. Do you know how to correctly pronounce the names of all 50 states? That's what we'll practice in this video. You can do this while getting ready for a barbecue with your friends. [Pronunciation exercise] This is how it works. You'll see the name of a state on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. Repeat each state name after the speaker. The more time you spend practicing, the sooner you'll see progress. Let's begin! • Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming You're done! Congratulations! Celebrate Independence Day with us by Liking this video and sharing it on your favorite social network. Let us know in the comments what other word lists you would like to see on our Sounds American channel. Stay tuned and don't forget to subscribe!
Views: 124794 Sounds American
Consonant Sound Flap 'T' / t̬ / as in "water" – American English Pronunciation
 
06:55
This consonant sound can be confusing, but if you pronounce it in the right way at the right time, you'll sound way more like an American. In this video, you'll find out how to make the flap 'T' / t̬/ consonant, when and why it's used in words. You'll practice making this sound with a pronunciation exercise recorded by a speech-language pathologist, specializing in an American accent. Quick Links: • "Regular" 'T' vs Flap 'T': 0:20 • What is a Flap 'T' sound? 0:55 • When does the Flap 'T' occur? 01:51 • Why do Americans pronounce the Flap 'T'? 02:10 • How to make the flap /t̬/ sound: 02:28 • Pronunciation exercise: 03:39 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #StopSounds ►Stop Sounds Overview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFPbLcUCraQ ► Consonant Sound / p / as in "pie" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_n_rUKQSew& ► Consonant Sound /b/ as in "boy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbCOXRz7Uf8 ► Consonant Sound /t/ as in "toy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLlotV_0dRI& ► Consonant Sound Glottal 'T' /ʔ/ as in "button" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vabg-EUHOQk ► Consonant Sound /d/ as in "dog" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N73xPe0x79g ► Consonant Sound /k/ as in "key" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxrveu6yu6E& ► Consonant Sound /g/ as in "gift" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP5XKYvxe0Q [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, CHINESE, JAPANESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the flap 'T' sound, as in the word "water." You can also hear this sound in words like "city," "butter," "title" or "kitty." Now listen to how these words sound with a "regular" 'T': "city," "butter," "title," "kitty." Can you hear a difference? In American English, these words are pronounced with the flap 'T'. There's nothing wrong with using a "regular" 'T', it just sounds a little less American and more British. And there's nothing wrong with British English. So, if you have more important things to work on for your pronunciation, you may skip the rest of this video. If you'd like to fine-tune your American accent, keep watching. So, what exactly is the flap 'T' sound? If you watched the Stop Sounds Overview video, you may remember that there are six stop consonants in American English. And yet, here's one more stop sound. No, it's not a mistake. The flap 'T' is somewhere between the /t/ and the /d/ sounds. It's basically the /t/ sound which is pronounced in a different way in certain positions in a word. The thing is, when the /t/ occurs between voiced sounds, it sounds more like a quick /d/: "water." When does it happen? When the /t/ is between two vowels, as vowel sounds are always voiced: "Betty," "dated," "writer" Or between a vowel and a voiced consonant sound: "little," "metal," "bottom." Why does it happen? Because it's easier to continue voicing rather than switching to a voiceless /t/ sound. For example, "bet" – "Betty". Speaking about voicing, it's time to learn how to make the flap 'T' and find out whether it's similar or different from the /t/ and the /d/ sounds. Just like for the /t/ or the /d/ sounds, slightly open your mouth and leave your lips in a neutral position. Now, you have to stop the air in your mouth. Again, do it the same way as for the /t/ or the /d/: Place the tip of your tongue on the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Next, release the air and add your voice. This is where the flap 'T' may sound similar to the /d/ sound, but the flap 'T' is quicker. The flap 'T' is also called a "tap" 'T' because it describes how your tongue quickly taps your alveolar ridge, so focus on making a brief voiced sound, much like a fast /d/. Now, let's try saying it: /t̬/, /t̬/, /t̬/. [Pronunciation exercise] Time to do some practice exercises. As usual, you’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Don't skip this part, as the more time you practice, the better your pronunciation will become. Let’s begin! • auto • artist • beauty • data • duty • party • pity • forty • later • editor • motor • graffiti • liberty • visitor • daughter • dramatic • authority • computer • attic • pretty • matter • better • butter • cottage • committee • little • battle • bottle • cattle • turtle You're done! Congratulations! Give us a thumbs up if you liked this video. Share this video with your friends and don't forget to subscribe!
Views: 55518 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / æ / as in "cat"- American English Pronunciation
 
05:24
Find out how to pronounce vowel sound /æ/ used in words like "back," "fact," or "jam." Improve your American accent with exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / æ / vowel sound in everyday words. Learn about the essential spelling rules for the /æ/ vowel. Look for a special soundtrack at the very end of the video. Quick links: • How to make the /æ/ sound: 0:52 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:09 • Most common spelling for the sound /æ/: 4:22 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #FrontlVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel sound /ɛ/, as in "bed": https://youtu.be/OLG3cCLcNiI ► Vowel sound /eɪ/, as in "make": https://youtu.be/0RXzfRcjk-s ► Contrasting sounds /ɛ/ vs /æ/, as in "bed" and "bad": https://youtu.be/GnWPcvI20Uk [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the Sounds American channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American vowel sound /æ/, as in the word "cat." You can also hear this sound in words like "at," "half," "man," or "laugh." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol—/æ/—for this sound. The /æ/ is specific to English, as the majority of other languages don't have this sound. That's the reason why many people distort the /æ/ or replace it with other vowels. Let's learn how to pronounce this sound the right (American) way. OK, to pronounce the /æ/ sound, you should focus on the correct position of your tongue and jaw. Open your mouth as wide as possible, slightly spread your lips, and tense them. Tense your tongue, flatten it, and push it forward. Your tongue should be positioned very low in your mouth. The tip of your tongue should be touching the back of your bottom front teeth. Remember, the /æ/ is a very open vowel sound, so your jaw should be very low and your tongue should be very flat. Now, let's try saying it: /æ/, /æ/, /æ/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let's practice this sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this: [abstract]. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word, if you want to. Let's begin! • act • add • Alps • am • an • and • angle • ankle • ant • apple • as • ash • ask • asks • at • babble • back • backed • backpack • backs • bad • badge • bag • band • bang • bank • bass • bat • batch You're done! Congratulations! By the way, the /æ/ is almost always written as the letter 'a.' And more on the spelling: the letter 'a' stands for the /æ/ sound, as in the word "cat," in 97% of cases. The remaining 3% are split between the combination of letters 'al,' as in the word "half," and 'au,' as in the word "laugh." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 232616 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / ʊ / as in "put" - American English Pronunciation
 
05:42
Learn how to pronounce vowel sound / ʊ / used in words like "good," "full," or "book." Improve your American accent with exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / ʊ / vowel sound in everyday words. Learn about the essential spelling rules for the / ʊ/ vowel. Enjoy a surprise bonus at the end of the video! Quick links: • How to make the /ʊ/ sound: 1:07 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:16 • Most common spelling for the sound /ʊ/: 4:29 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #BackVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ►Vowel sound /u/, as in "blue": https://youtu.be/lkM6CKBM2ns ►Vowel sound /oʊ/, as in "go": https://youtu.be/4kPJLHiiGdU ►Vowel sound /ɔ/, as in "on": https://youtu.be/pr_KAu-_Hmo [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, KOREAN, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American vowel sound /ʊ/, as in the word "put." You can also hear this sound in words like "push," "book," "wolf," or "could." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol — /ʊ/ — for this sound. The /ʊ/ sound exists in less than 20% of the world's languages; that's why people often confuse it with the /u/ sound, as in the word "blue." Let's see if you can distinguish between them: "fool" - "full." Can you tell the difference? If you're not quite sure, let's start with learning how to make the /ʊ/ sound. OK, to pronounce the /ʊ/ sound, you should focus on the correct position of your jaw, lips, and tongue. Slightly open your mouth, round your lips, and relax them. Pull your tongue back in your mouth and relax it. Lift the back of your tongue toward the roof of your mouth. Remember, the /ʊ/ is a relaxed sound, so your tongue and lips should be relaxed, and your tongue should be pulled back. Now, let's try saying it: /ʊ/, /ʊ/, /ʊ/. Now, let's practice this sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word, if you want to. Let's begin. [Pronunciation exercise] • book • brook • bull • bush • cook • could • crook • foot • full • good • hood • hoof • hook • look • looked • looks • poor • pull • pulls • push • pushed • put • shook • should • stood • sure • took • wolf • would • wool You're done! Congratulations! By the way, did you know that the /ʊ/ sound is most frequently written as the letter 'u'? The /ʊ/ sound is represented by the letter 'u,' as in the word "put," in 45% of cases. Almost the same percentage of words with this sound is written as the combination of the letters 'oo,' as in the word "book." The remaining 10% are split between the letter 'o,' as in the word "wolf," and the combination of the letters 'ou,' as in the word "could." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 98928 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / ə / (Schwa) as in "ago" - American English Pronunciation
 
05:32
Learn how to pronounce vowel sound / ə / used in words like "America," "pizza," or "address." Practice pronunciation of the / ə / vowel sound with exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Find about the essential spelling for the / ə / vowel. Improve your American accent with efficient exercises by practicing your pronunciation with the most common words. Check if you can find something special at the very end of the video! :) Quick links: • How to make the /ə/ sound: 0:53 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:01 • Most common spelling for the sound /ə/: 4:15 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #CentralVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel sound /ɪ /, as in "it": https://goo.gl/HJ3kDs ► Vowel sound /ɛ/, as in "bed": https://goo.gl/L7777P ► Vowel sound /ʌ/, as in "us": https://goo.gl/2LT6S2 [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, KOREAN, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we’re going to talk about the American vowel sound /ə/, as in the word "ago." You can also hear this sound in words like "above," "person," "parent," or "action." Please, note, that we’ll be using a special phonetic symbol — /ə/ — for this sound. The /ə/ sound is one of the two most frequently used vowel sounds in American English. In fact, one in every five words has the /ə/ sound. If you want to pronounce it like an American, keep watching. OK, to pronounce the /ə/ sound, you should focus on relaxing your tongue and lips. Slightly open your mouth, relax your lips, and leave them in a neutral position. Place your tongue in the middle of your mouth and relax it. Remember, the /ə/ sound is very relaxed, so your tongue and lips should be relaxed when you pronounce it. Let’s try saying it: /ə/, /ə/, /ə/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let’s practice this sound in some words. You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word, if you want to. Let’s begin. • ability • above • abrupt • absence • absent • abyss • academic • accident • accurate • accusal • achieve • achieve • across • action • actual • adapt • addition • address • adequate • adjust • administration • adopt • adult • advance • affect • afraid • Africa • again • against • agency You’re done! Congratulations! By the way, did you know that the /ə/ sound is written as the letter "a" in one-third of all cases? More on the spelling: Most often, the /ə/ sound is written as the letter "a," as in the word "above," then by the letter "o," as in the word "today," and the letter "e," as in the word "even." Less often it’s represented by a combination of the letters "io," as in the word "nation"; the letter "i," as in the word "pencil"; and the letter "u," as in the word "product." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 124510 Sounds American
Bus or Boss? Luck or Lock? American English Pronunciation
 
06:56
Learn the difference between the / ʌ / and / ɑ / vowel sounds. Practice pronunciation of the / ʌ / and / ɑ / with word contrasts using words like "hut" and "hot," "fund" and "fond," or "shut" and "shot." Improve your American accent with essential pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Do you hear the difference b/w the / ʌ / and / ɑ /? Quiz: 0:58 • Key distinctions b/w the / ʌ / and / ɑ /: 2:13 • Pronunciation exercise: 3:22 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #MinimalPairs ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel Sound /ʌ/ as in "us"- American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/9LRTZ4 ►Vowel Sound /ɑ/ as in "got"- American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/pMYbHs [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, VIETNAMESE, AND CHINESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we'll compare two vowel sounds: /ʌ/ and /ɑ/, as in the words "bus" and "boss." In our past videos we already learned how to make them. Remember the videos for the /ʌ/ sound, as in the word "us"and the /ɑ/ sound, as in the word "got"? This time we'll focus on the differences between these two sounds. The /ʌ/ and /ɑ/ vowels can be very tricky for non-native English speakers. Most people confuse these two sounds or distort them in speech. What about you? Let's check with a quick test. You'll see a pair of words on the screen and hear only one of them pronounced. For example, "***." Can you guess what word you heard? Let's try a few more word pairs. [Quiz] What's your score? Don't worry if you couldn't recognize some of the words. You'll improve after doing the following pronunciation exercises. Here are the 2 key distinctions between the /ʌ/ and the /ɑ/: First, look at the position of the jaw: • For the /ʌ/ sound, the mouth is slightly open. • For the /ɑ/ sound, the mouth is open very wide. Second. Look at the tongue: • For the /ʌ/ sound, the tongue is in the middle of the mouth. • For the /ɑ/ sound, the tongue is flat, and very low in the mouth. Now let's pronounce these sounds one after the other: /ʌ/ - /ɑ/, /ʌ/ - /ɑ/, /ʌ/ - /ɑ/ Okay, you've reached the most important part of this video - the practice! In the next exercise the /ʌ/ and the /ɑ/ will be contrasted in word pairs. This way you'll not only practice pronunciation of these sounds, but at the same time you'll teach yourself to hear the differences between them. So, let's do this exercise. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. After that you'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, the first word will have the /ʌ/ vowel sound, and the second will have the /ɑ/ vowel sound. Let's begin! [Pronunciation exercise] • bus – boss • color – collar • cub – cob • duck – dock • dull – doll • fund – fond • hunk – honk • hut – hot • luck – lock • nut – not • rub – rob • shut – shot • stuck - stock You're done! Congratulations! To check how much you've improved, you can do the word pairs test again. Click this link to go back and compare the results. By the way, did you know that the /ʌ/ and the /ɑ/ sounds are relatively rare in American English? The /ɑ/ occurs in 5% of words and the /ʌ/ in only 4%. No wonder these two vowels can be so tricky to pronounce :). Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 93917 Sounds American
Bed or Bad? Head or Had? Men or Man? American English Pronunciation
 
07:10
Find out the difference between the / ɛ / and / æ / vowel sounds. Learn how to make the vowels used in words like "head" and "had," "left" and "laughed," or "leg" and "lag." Improve your accent with efficient pronunciation exercises based on minimal word pairs with the / ɛ / and / æ / vowel sounds. Quick Links: • Do you hear the difference b/w the / ɛ / and / æ /? Quiz: 0:41 • Key distinctions b/w the / ɛ / and / æ /: 2:07 • Pronunciation exercise: 3:20 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #MinimalPairs ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel Sound /ɛ/ as in "bed"- American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/AKvPD0 ► Vowel Sound / æ / as in "cat"- American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/0yeEhr [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we'll compare two vowel sounds: /ɛ/ and /æ/, as in the words "bed" and "bad." In our previous videos we already learned how to make them. Remember the videos for the /ɛ/ sound, as in "bed" and the /æ/ sound, as in "cat"? This time we'll focus on the differences between these two sounds. Many non-native English speakers can't always hear the difference between /ɛ/ and /æ/. What about you? [QUIZ] Let's check with a quick test. You'll see a pair of words on the screen and hear only one of them pronounced. For example, "b*d." Can you guess what word you heard? Let's try a few more word pairs. If you didn't get all the words right, don't worry. We've prepared useful exercises to help you improve. The words in those pairs may sound similar but they differ by their vowel sound. Here are the two key distinctions between the /ɛ/ and /æ/: First, look at the position of the lower jaw. • For the /ɛ/ sound, the mouth is half open. • For the /æ/ sound, the mouth is open very wide. Second. Look at the tongue: • For the /ɛ/ sound, the tongue is relaxed and in the middle of your mouth. • For the /æ/ sound, the tongue is tensed, flat and very low in your mouth. Let's pronounce these sounds one after the other: /ɛ/ - /æ/, /ɛ/ - /æ/, /ɛ/ - /æ/ [Pronunciation Exercise] Now that you know how to make these vowels, let's do some exercises. This is the most important part of your training as you can't improve your pronunciation without practice. The best way to practice the /ɛ/ and /æ/ is to pronounce them in word pairs. Let's do this exercise. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. After that you'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, the first word will have the relaxed /ɛ/ vowel sound, and the second will have the tense /æ/ vowel sound. Let's begin! • bed - bad • beg - bag • bend - band • bet - bat • dead - dad • den - Dan • end - and • flesh - flash • gem - jam • guess - gas • head - had • left - laughed • leg - lag • lend - land • letter - latter You're done! Congratulations! To check how much you've improved, you can do the word pairs test again. Click this link to go back and compare the results. By the way, did you know that the vowel sounds /ɛ/ and /æ/ together make up about ~20% of all vowels in American English? Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 69442 Sounds American
'TH': Consonant Sound / θ / as in "think"- American English Pronunciation
 
07:50
Learn how to pronounce consonant sound /θ/ used in words like "theater," "south," or "bathroom." Improve your American accent with two phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the /θ/ consonant sound in commonly used words. Check if you can find a surprise bonus at the end of the video! Quick links: • How to make the /θ/ sound: 01:06 • Most common mistakes with the /θ/ sound: 2:05 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 03:26 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 05:24 • Most common spelling for the /θ/ sound: 06:33 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #FricativeSounds ► Consonant Sound /f/ as in "fun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05f62-73nrY ► Consonant Sound /v/ as in "very" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5Oro6v0klg ► Consonant Sound /s/ as in "sun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hWPXaPXrnQ ► Consonant Sound /z/ as in "zoo" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky7Jh9Bbjts ► Consonant Sound /ʃ/ as in "show" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wINb4HFguck ► Consonant Sound /ʒ/ as in "vision" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8ImSmVOSVA ► Consonant Sound /θ/ as in "think" - this video ► Consonant Sound /ð/ as in "this" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZb_EWVCUoE ► Consonant Sound /h/ as in "home" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dV6At0g4n78 ► The Shocking Truth About Long And Short English Vowels https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQa9w__GqLc ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& [ THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /θ/, as in the word "think." You can also hear this sound in words like "thank," "bath," "author" or "three." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /θ/ - for this sound. The English /θ/ sound occurs in very few world languages, so it's unfamiliar to the majority of non-native speakers. Many non-native speakers often distort it or replace it with more familiar sounds, such as /s/, /t/ or /f/. Fortunately, this sound is not that hard to make. Once you learn how to do it, it's just a matter of practice. So, let's find out how to make the /θ/ sound. This sound is all about the tip of your tongue. Slightly open your mouth and put the tip of your tongue between your front teeth. Note that the tip of your tongue may gently touch the bottom of your upper front teeth. Now blow air over your tongue making a noise with friction. The stream of air should flow between your upper teeth and your tongue. Note that the /θ/ is a voiceless fricative sound. This means that it's made from friction in the stream of air, but not with your voice. Let's try saying it: /θ/, /θ/, /θ/. Here are a few typical mistakes that people make when pronouncing the /θ/ sound: 1. Keeping the mouth closed or "biting" the bottom lip. The /θ/ gets distorted and sounds more like the /f/. - Make sure your mouth is slightly open and that your upper teeth don't touch your lower lip. 2. Not pushing the tongue forward enough or pressing the tongue against the upper front teeth. This way you'll make a sound in between the /s/, /z/ and the /θ/. - Put the tip of your tongue between your upper and bottom front teeth. 3. Stopping the airflow with the tip of the tongue. The /θ/ sound gets distorted and sounds more like /t/ or /d/. - /θ/ is a continuous sound; so keep the airstream flowing. You should be able to stretch the /θ/ out: /θ-θ-θ- θ/. Now, let's practice the /θ/ sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. To achieve the best results, repeat each word after the speaker and try to practice as many words as possible. Let's begin. [Pronunciation exercise] • birth • both • cloth • death • depth • earth • faith • fifth • forth • math • moth • mouth • ninth • north • teeth [Pronunciation exercise] • tenth • thank • theft • theme • thick • thief • thin • thing • think • third • thorn • three • threw • throw Did you know that the combination of the letters "th" may actually represent two sounds: the voiceless consonant sound /θ/, as in the word "think," and the voiced consonant sound /ð/, as in the word "this"? Here's how you can check which sound to use: "th" sounds as /θ/ at the beginning or at the end of the stem of content words. For example, "theater," or "health." "th" sounds as /ð/ at the beginning of function words. For example, "this." Or between vowels in content words, for example, "breathe."
Views: 96574 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / ɑ / as in "got"- American English Pronunciation
 
05:27
Learn how to pronounce vowel sound /ɑ/. Practice pronunciation of the /ɑ/ sound, used in words like "hot," "wash," or "calm". Find about the essential spelling rules for the /ɑ/ vowel. Improve your American accent with exercises recorded by an American speaker. Check out a bonus track at the end of the video! :) Quick links: • How to make the /ɑ/ sound: 0:52 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:04 • Most common spelling for the sound /ɑ/: 4:17 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #CentralVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel sound /ʌ/, as in "us": https://youtu.be/X1utTZqC3AI ► Vowel sound /ɔ/, as in "on": https://youtu.be/pr_KAu-_Hmo ► Contrasting sounds /ʌ/ vs /ɑ/, as in "bus" and "boss": https://youtu.be/MqcCCFptaJk [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, KOREAN, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we’re going to talk about the American vowel sound /ɑ/, as in the word "got." You can also hear this sound in words like "top," "want," "box," or "wash." We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol — /ɑ/ — for this sound. The vowel sound /ɑ/ is pretty common around the world, however, it's sometimes distorted or confused with other vowels in American English. Next, we'll tell you how to make this sound properly and provide exercises for practice. OK, to pronounce the /ɑ/ sound, you should focus on the correct position of your jaw and tongue. Open your mouth as wide as possible. Relax your lips and allow them to rest in a neutral position. Flatten your tongue and place it very low in your mouth. Your tongue should be in the center of your mouth. The tip of your tongue should be touching the back of your bottom front teeth. Remember, the /ɑ/ is a very open sound, so your mouth should be open as wide as possible. Let’s try saying it: /ɑ/, /ɑ/, /ɑ/. [Pronunciation Exercise] Now, let’s practice this sound in some words. You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word if you want to. Let’s begin. • aunt • block • Bob • bottle • box • calm • chop • clock • cob • cod • cotton • crop • dock • doll • dot • drop • flock • flop • fond • fox • got • gotten • honk • hop • hot • job • John • knob • knock • knot You’re done! Congratulations! By the way, the /ɑ/ sound is most often written as the letter 'o.' More on the spelling: the letter 'o' stands for the /ɑ/ sound, as in the word "got," in 87% of cases. The remaining 13% belong to the letter 'a,' as in the word "want." Sometimes, this sound is written by the combination of letters 'al,' as in the word "calm." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 117331 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / ɪ / as in "it"- American English Pronunciation [UPDATED]
 
06:19
Learn how to pronounce vowel sound /ɪ/ used in words like "big," "bill," or "did." Improve your American accent with two phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice the / ɪ/ sound with everyday words. Find out about the most frequent spelling rules for the /ɪ/ vowel sound. Quick Links: • How to make the /ɪ/ sound: 0:56 • Pronunciation exercise 1 : 1:47 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 3:48 • Most common spelling for the sound /ɪ/: 5:26 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #FrontVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel sound /i/, as in "be": https://goo.gl/BnB7qE ► Vowel sound /æ/, as in "cat": https://goo.gl/oUP3un ► Contrasting sounds /i/ vs /ɪ/ as in "ship" or "ship": https://goo.gl/3v6URT [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we’re going to talk about the American vowel sound /ɪ/, as in the word "it". You can also hear this sound in words like "big," "gym," "English," or "image." We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /ɪ/ - for this sound. The /ɪ/ is one of the two most frequent vowel sounds in American English, but it exists in less than 20% of world languages, so many people may distort it or replace with the /i/ sound, as in the word "be". Let’s find out how to make this sound. OK. To pronounce the /ɪ/ sound, you should to focus on the correct position of your tongue. Slightly open your mouth, spread your lips and relax them. Raise your tongue high in your mouth and push it to the front. The tip of your tongue can be lowered just behind your bottom front teeth. Remember, the /ɪ/ is a relaxed sound, so your tongue and lips should be relaxed, and your tongue should be at the front of your mouth. Now, let’s try saying it: /ɪ/, /ɪ/, /ɪ/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let’s practice this sound in some words. You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word, if you want to. Let’s begin. • big • bit • chin • chip • click • clip • drink • drip • film • fish • fit • fix • hid • him • hint • hit • kick • kid • king • kiss Let’s pause for a moment and review the key points. Your tongue should be relaxed, raised high in your mouth and pushed to the front. Let’s continue practicing. [Pronunciation exercise] • begin • biscuit • business • dismiss • district • finish • image • inches • limit • liquid • picnic • primitive • princess • sickness • spinach • ticket • visit • windmill • within • women You’re done! Congratulations! By the way, in most cases the /ɪ/ is written by the letter 'i', so spelling words with this sound is fairly easy. And more on the spelling: the /ɪ/ is represented by the letter 'i' in 73% of words with this sound. Less often it’s written by the letter 'e', like in the word "English," or by the letter 'a', like in the word "image," and sometimes by the letter 'y', like in the word "gym." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 82241 Sounds American
Sheep or Ship? Heat or Hit? Beat or Bit? American English Pronunciation
 
06:51
Learn the difference between the /i/ and /ɪ/ vowel sounds. Find out how to make the vowels used in words like "heat" and "hit," "beat" and "bit," or "seat" and "sit." Improve your accent with efficient pronunciation exercises based on minimal word pairs with the /i/ and /ɪ/ vowel sounds. Quick Links: • Can you hear the difference b/w the /i/ and /ɪ/? Quiz: 0:51 • Key distinctions b/w the /i/ and /ɪ/: 2:08 • Pronunciation exercise: 3:11 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #MinimalPairs ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel Sound /i/ as in the word "be" - American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/BnB7qE ► Vowel Sound /ɪ/ as in "it" - American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/HJ3kDs [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we'll compare two vowel sounds: /i/ and /ɪ/, as in the words "heat" and "hit." In our past videos we already learned how to make them. Remember, the videos for the /i/ sound, as in "be" and the /ɪ/ sound, as in "it"? This time we'll focus on the difference between these two sounds. Many non-native English speakers can't always hear the difference between /i/ and /ɪ/. What about you? Let's check with a quick test. You'll see a pair of words on the screen and hear only one of them. For example, "h..t." Can you guess what word you heard? Let's try a few more word pairs. [QUIZ] Okay, what's your score? The higher the better, but don't be discouraged if you didn't get all of the words right. You'll improve after doing the exercise in a minute. The words in those pairs may sound the same but they differ by their vowel sound. Here are the two key distinctions between the /i/ and the /ɪ/: First, look at the lips. • For the /i/ sound, the lips are spread very wide and tensed. • For the /ɪ/ sound, the lips are spread less and relaxed. Second. Look at what's going on inside the mouth: • For the /i/ sound, the mouth is open very little and the tongue is raised very high. • For the /ɪ/ sound, the mouth is open a little bit more and thus, the tongue is raised slightly lower. Let's pronounce these sounds one after the other: /i/ - /ɪ/, /i/ - /ɪ/ [Pronunciation Exercise] The best way to practice making these sounds is to pronounce them in word pairs. Let's do this exercise. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. After that you'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, the first word will have the tense /i/ vowel sound, and the second will have the relaxed /ɪ/ vowel sound. The only way to improve your pronunciation is to listen to and repeat as many words as possible. Let's begin. • bead - bid • bean - bin • beat - bit • beaten -bitten • cheap - chip • deed - did • deep - dip • ease - is • eat - it • eats - its • feast - fist • feel - fill • feet - fit • heal - hill • heap - hip You're done! Congratulations! To check how much you've improved, you can do the word pairs test again. Click this link to go back and compare the results. By the way, did you know that in American English the relaxed /ɪ/ vowel sound occurs twice as often as the tense /i/? Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 87624 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / r / as in "run"- American English Pronunciation
 
07:12
Learn how to pronounce consonant sound /r/ used in words like "rate," "dry," or "read." Improve your American accent with two phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the /r/ consonant sound in everyday words. Enjoy a surprise bonus as a reward for watching this video till the end! Quick Links: • How to make the consonant sound /r/: 01:05 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 02:22 • Pronunciation tip: 04:25 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 04:43 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #LiquidSounds ►Consonant Sound /l/ as in "let": https://goo.gl/oYxUMG ►Pray or Play? Rain or Lane? American English Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/SV9e3w ►Advanced American Pronunciation Exercise for /r/ and /l/ sounds, as in "curriculum" : https://goo.gl/yyiO0Y ►Pronunciation of American English Vowel Sounds: https://goo.gl/Epg4gV ►Advanced pronunciation exercises. Contrasting Vowels: https://goo.gl/A777MK ►R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɝ / as in "first"- American English Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/4vudhf ►R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɚ / as in "after"- American English Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/S3Ko5r Subscribe to Sounds American channel: https://goo.gl/SAlzvr [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /r/, as in the word "run." You can also hear this sound in words like "read," "tree," "from" or "break." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /r/ - for this sound. The /r/ sound is found in most languages (with a few exceptions.) But the American /r/ is quite different. Non-native speakers often mispronounce the American /r/ sound. They trill, tap, or even replace it with other sounds such as /l/, /d/, or /t/. Keep watching to learn how to pronounce the American /r/ and practice it in words. Ok, you should never trill the American /r/, like this: /r/. To make the sound correctly, let's start by opening your mouth a little and slightly rounding your lips. It's very important to focus on the position of your tongue when you're making the /r/. Raise the front of your tongue toward the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth, but don't touch it. By the way, if you don't know what the alveolar ridge is, that's where the pointer is right now. Next: curl back the tip of your tongue. Now slightly lower the center of your tongue and raise its back. Your tongue should be tensed. Remember, the tip of your tongue should be curled back and it should never touch the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Now, let's try saying it: /r/, /r/, /r/. [Pronunciation Exercise] Now, let's practice the /r/ sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, this is the most important part of the exercise. Let's begin. • race • rack • raft • rag • rail • rain • rake • ram • ran • rang • rank • rap • rash • rat • rate • raw • ray • read • real • reap • red • rent • rest Let's pause here for a second and check on how you are making the /r/ sound. The tip of your tongue should be curled back and raised towards the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Remember, you should not touch it. [Pronunciation Exercise] Let's continue practicing. • crab • crew • crop • crow • cry • drag • draw • drip • drop • drum • dry • free • frog • from • fry • grab • gray • Greg • grew • grip You're done! Congratulations! By the way, did you notice that in the words that you've just practiced, the /r/ never followed a vowel? That's because a vowel sound followed by the /r/ consonant sound becomes an r-colored vowel. R-colored vowels are a characteristic feature of an American accent. But that's a topic for future videos on our Sounds American channel.
Views: 73326 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / i / as in "be" - American English Pronunciation [UPDATED]
 
06:34
Learn how to pronounce vowel sound /i/ used in words like "be," "sea," or "meet." Improve your accent with pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice making the /i/ sound with everyday words. Find out the essential spelling rules for the /i/ vowel sound. Quick Links • How to make the /i/ sound: 0:46 • Pronunciation exercise 1 : 1:49 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 3:54 • Spelling for the sound /i/: 5:34 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #FrontVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel sound /ɪ/ as in "it": https://goo.gl/gUDxBi ► Vowel sound /æ/ as in "cat": https://goo.gl/Q8d51H ► Contrasting sounds /i/ vs /ɪ/ as in "sheep" or "ship": https://goo.gl/jvnvEj [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES!] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we’re going to talk about the American vowel sound /i/, as in the word “be”. You can also hear this sound in words like "each," "see," "key" or "ski." Please, note, that we’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /i/ - for this sound. The /i/ is the third most frequently used vowel sound in American English, so pronouncing it correctly is important for your American accent. Let’s find out how to make this sound. Ok. To make the /i/ sound, you should focus on the correct position of your lips, tongue, and jaw. Open your mouth a little, stretch your lips as wide as you can, and make them tense. Raise your tongue very high and push it to the front of your mouth. The tip of your tongue should be lowered just behind your bottom front teeth. Remember, the /i/ is a tense sound, so your lips and tongue should be tense. Your tongue should be at the front of your mouth. Let’s try saying it: /i/, /i/, /i/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let’s practice this sound in some words. You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word, if you want to. Let’s begin. • bead • beam • bean • beat • cheap • cheese • clean • cream • each • eve • feel • feet • flea • free • meal • meet • peak • people • piece • please Let’s pause for a second and check how you’re making the /i/ sound. Remember, your lips should be very tense and stretched as wide as possible. [Pronunciation exercise] Let's continue practicing. • anybody • audience • believable • champion • company • curious • easy • energy • family • memory • necessary • nuclear • obvious • previous • property • really • species • theater • usually • various You’re done! Congratulations! By the way, did you know that the /i/ sound is represented by the letter 'e' in only 15% of words? Most often the /i/ is represented by the letter 'y,' as in "city," followed by the letter 'e,' as in "be" and lastly by the letter 'i,' as in 'ski.' It’s also often represented by combinations of letters, such as "ea," as in "each," 'ee,' as in "see," and 'ie,' as in "piece." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 71708 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / ʌ / as in "us"- American English Pronunciation
 
05:28
Learn how to pronounce vowel sound /ʌ/ used in words like "but," "come," or "does.” Practice pronunciation of the /ʌ/ vowel sound in most common words. Find about the essential spelling rules for the /ʌ/ vowel. Improve your American accent with exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Check out a bonus track at the end of the video! :) Quick links: • How to make the /ʌ/ sound: 0:57 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:04 • Most common spelling for the sound /ʌ/: 4:18 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #CentralVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel sound /ə/, as in "ago": https://goo.gl/8w6gD1 ► Vowel sound /ɑ/, as in "got": https://goo.gl/S4pRUV ► Contrasting sounds /ʌ vs /ɑ/, as in "bus" or "boss": https://goo.gl/Muh5ht [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the “Sounds American” channel. In this video, we’re going to talk about the American vowel sound /ʌ/, as in the word “us.” You can also hear this sound in words like “but,” “come,” “young,” or “flood.” Please, note, that we’ll be using a special phonetic symbol — /ʌ/ — for this sound. The vowel /ʌ/ exists in only 5% of the world’s languages. It’s no wonder that non-native English speakers often distort it or replace it with more familiar sounds. This video will help get you acquainted with the /ʌ/ and help you make it the right way. Let’s find out how to make this sound. OK, to make the /ʌ/ sound, you should focus on the correct position of your lips and tongue. Open your mouth a little, relax your lips, and put them in a neutral position. Place your tongue in the middle of your mouth, not too high or too low. Note that the /ʌ/ vowel sound is used in stressed syllables, but your lips and tongue should not be tense. Your tongue should be in the center of your mouth. Let’s try saying it: /ʌ/, /ʌ/, /ʌ/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let’s practice this sound in some words. You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word if you want to. Let’s begin. • blood • blush • brush • bubble • buckle • bud • bug • bulb • bulk • bum • bump • bun • bunch • bundle • bungle • bus • but • butt • button • buzz • club • come • couple • crumb • crumble • crush • crust • cub • cuddle • cup You’re done! Congratulations! By the way, the letter 'u' stands for the /ʌ/ sound in 78% of cases. More on the spelling: Most often, the /ʌ/ sound is written as the letter 'u,' as in the word "but," then as the letter 'o,' as in the word "come." Less often it’s represented by the combination of the letters 'ou,' as in the word "young," and 'oo,' as in the word "flood." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 102143 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / ɛ / as in "bed" - American English Pronunciation
 
05:41
Learn how to pronounce vowel sound /ɛ/. Practice the /ɛ/ vowel in words like "get," "best," "friend" recorded by a professional speech therapist. Improve your American accent with phonetics exercises for the /ɛ/ sound. Find out about the most common spelling rules for the /ɛ/ vowel sound. There may or may not be a bonus at the very end of the video :). Quick links: • How to make the /ɛ/ sound: 0:58 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:19 • Spelling for the sound /ɛ/: 4:31 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #FrontlVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel sound /æ/, as in "cat": https://youtu.be/mynucZiy-Ug ► Vowel sound /eɪ/, as in "make": https://youtu.be/0RXzfRcjk-s ► Contrasting sound /ɛ/ vs /æ/, as in "bed" and "bad": https://youtu.be/GnWPcvI20Uk [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we"re going to talk about the American vowel sound /ɛ/, as in the word "bed." You can also hear this sound in words like "get," "head," "many," or "friend." We"ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /ɛ/ - for this sound. Let"s check if you can recognize the /ɛ/ sound. Listen to these words: "bed and bad." If they sound the same to you or if you"re not sure about it, this video might help you. Keep watching, and let's find out how to make this vowel sound. OK, to pronounce the /ɛ/ sound, you should focus on the correct position of your tongue and jaw. Partially open your mouth, slightly spread your lips, and relax them. Push your tongue to the front of your mouth and relax it. Raise the middle of your tongue to the roof of your mouth. The tip of your tongue can be lowered just behind your bottom front teeth. Remember, the /ɛ/ is a relaxed sound, so your tongue and lips should be relaxed. Your jaw should be partially lowered. Now, let's try saying it: /ɛ/, /ɛ/, /ɛ/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let's practice this sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this: [bed] You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word if you want to. Let's begin. • beg • bell • belt • bench • bend • bent • best • bet • blend • bless • bread • breadth • breast • breath • cell • cent • check • chef • chest • crept • dead • deaf • death • debt • deck • delve • den • depth • desk You're done! Congratulations! Did you know that the /ɛ/ sound is written as the letter 'e' 92% of the time? A bit more on the topic of spelling: usually, this sound is written with the letter 'e,' as in "bed." In the rest of the cases, it can be spelled with the combination of letters 'ea,' as in the word "head;" And with the letter 'a,' as in the word "many;" or by a combination of the letters 'ie' as in the word "friend." Thanks for watching! Hope you find this video useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 68495 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / u / as in "blue"- American English Pronunciation
 
05:43
Learn how to pronounce vowel sound /u/. Practice pronunciation of the /u/ sound, used in words like "food," "flu," or "cool." Find about the essential spelling rules for the /u/ vowel. Improve your American accent with exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Check out a bonus track at the end of the video! :) Quick links: • How to make the /u/ sound: 1:06 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:15 • Most common spelling for the sound /u/: 4:30 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #BackVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ►Vowel sound /ʊ/, as in "put": https://youtu.be/moLTR-dLQQY ►Vowel sound /oʊ/, as in "go": https://youtu.be/4kPJLHiiGdU ►Vowel sound /ɔ/, as in "on": https://youtu.be/pr_KAu-_Hmo [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, KOREAN, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we’re going to talk about the American vowel sound /u/, as in the word "blue." You can also hear this sound in words like "rule," "too," "do," or "new." Please, note, that we’ll be using a special phonetic symbol — /u/ — for this sound. The /u/ sound is not unique to American English, but non-native English speakers usually make this sound too relaxed. Listen to these words: "pool" - "pull." If they sound the same to you or if you’re not sure about it, this video might help you. Keep watching, and let’s find out how to make this vowel sound. OK, to make the /u/ sound, you should focus on the correct position of your jaw, lips, and tongue. Open your mouth a little and push your lips out, making a small, tense circle. Pull your tongue far back in your throat and tense it. Raise the back of the tongue toward the roof of your mouth. Remember, the /u/ is a tense sound, so your lips and tongue should be tense. Your tongue should be pulled back in your mouth. Let’s try saying it: /u/, /u/, /u/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let’s practice this sound in some words. You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word if you want to. Let’s begin. • blew • bloom • blue • boom • boots • broom • chew • choose • cool • crew • dew • do • doom • due • flew • flu • food • fool • fruit • glue • google • goose • grew • group • hoop • juice • June • knew • loop • loose You’re done! Congratulations! By the way, did you know that the /u/ sound is written as the letter 'u' in less than 50% of cases? More on the spelling: the /u/ sound is written as the letter 'u' in 47% of cases. It’s also often written as the combination of the letters "oo" or as the single letter 'o,' as in the words "too" and "do," respectively. Sometimes, this vowel sound is represented by the combinations of the letters 'ew,' as in the word 'new,' or 'ou,' as in the word "soup." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 62104 Sounds American
Top 200 Most Common English Words with American Accent: Part 1
 
08:58
Learn how to pronounce the top 100 most common words with an American accent. Practice pronunciation of words like "what," "make," "have," or "this" that are used in typical daily conversations. Improve your American pronunciation using phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. This is the first part of the Top 200 words videos series. You can find the second part here: https://goo.gl/aWXH6Z Quick Links: • Pronunciation exercise: 0:45 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #PronunciationExercises #MostCommonWords ► Advanced American Pronunciation Exercise for /r/ and /l/ sounds, as in "curriculum": https://goo.gl/yyiO0Y ► 100 English Homophones with American Accent: https://goo.gl/VXhg1D ► American English Vowel Sounds Playlist (https://goo.gl/n5afZv) Subscribe to Sounds American: https://goo.gl/N4k8Ji Follow Sounds American on G+: https://plus.google.com/+SoundsAmerican [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we're going to learn how to pronounce the 100 most common English words with an American accent. It could be hard to decide where to start working on your American pronunciation. We know! Studies tell us that 80% of typical daily conversations are made up of just 200 words. So starting with these words is a great idea. It will quickly make your accent sound more American. In this video we'll practice the first hundred of the most common words. [Pronunciation exercise] This is how we're going to do that: You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. Repeat each word after the speaker. Make sure you do it. You can't learn to speak with an American accent unless you try it. Let's begin. 1. the 2. be 3. and 4. of 5. a 6. have 7. to 8. it 9. I 10. for 11. you 12. he 13. with 14. do 15. say 16. this 17. they 18. at 19. but 20. we 21. his 22. from 23. that 24. not 25. by 26. she 27. or 28. what 29. go 30. their 31. can 32. who 33. get 34. if 35. would 36. my 37. make 38. know 39. will 40. up 41. time 42. year 43. think 44. which 45. them 46. some 47. me 48. people 49. take 50. into 51. just 52. see 53. him 54. your 55. come 56. could 57. now 58. than 59. other 60. how 61. then 62. our 63. two 64. these 65. want 66. way 67. look 68. first 69. also 70. new 71. because 72. day 73. more 74. use 75. no 76. man 77. find 78. here 79. thing 80. give 81. many 82. well 83. those 84. tell 85. one 86. very 87. her 88. even 89. any 90. good 91. woman 92. through 93. us 94. life 95. child 96. there 97. down 98. may 99. should 100. call You're done! Congratulations! Take a break, get some rest and come back soon. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 150168 Sounds American
Consonant Sound Glottal 'T' / ʔ / as in "button" – American English Pronunciation
 
09:38
This consonant sound doesn't occur in many English words. However, it's very noticeable. For that matter, it makes a lot of sense to learn to pronounce it correctly. You'll sound very American 😊. In this video, you'll find out how to make the glottal 'T' / ʔ/ consonant, when and why it's used in words. You'll practice making this sound with a pronunciation exercise recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Glottal 'T' vs "Regular" 'T' : 0:19 • What is a Glottal 'T' sound? 01:19 • When does the Glottal 'T' occur? 01:38 • Why do Americans pronounce the Glottal 'T'? 02:12 • How to make the Glottal /ʔ/ sound: 02:42 • Pronunciation exercise: 05:47 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #StopSounds ► Stop Sounds Overview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFPbLcUCraQ ► Consonant Sound Flap 'T' /t̬/ as in "water" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9b-UIkuwOdU ► Consonant Sound /t/ as in "toy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLlotV_0dRI& ► Consonant Sound /d/ as in "dog" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N73xPe0x79g ► Consonant Sound /p/ as in "pie" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_n_rUKQSew& ► Consonant Sound /b/ as in "boy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbCOXRz7Uf8 ► Consonant Sound /k/ as in "key" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxrveu6yu6E ► Consonant Sound /ɡ/ as in "gift" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP5XKYvxe0Q [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, CHINESE, JAPANESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the glottal 'T' sound, as in the word "button." You can also hear this sound in words like "certain," "satin," "cotton" or "kitten." Now listen to how these words sound with the "regular" 'T'. Can you hear a difference? In American English, these words are pronounced with the glottal 'T.' It's not a mistake to use a "regular" 'T' sound. Don't worry, you'll be perfectly understood. Still, the glottal 'T' is typical for American English. So if you want to learn more about this sound and perfect your pronunciation skills, keep watching. OK, let's begin with a question: what is a glottal 'T' sound? If you watched the Stop Sounds Overview video, you may remember that there are six stop consonants in American English. Still, we're now talking about another stop sound. Yes, that's right. The glottal 'T' is a variation of the /t/ sound that occurs only in a certain position in a word and is pronounced in a different way. What happens is that the /t/ sound becomes a glottal 'T' before a weak syllable ending with /n/: "button." Why does a "regular" /t/ become a glottal 'T'? Informal speech is usually very relaxed. So, it's natural to swallow or drop vowels in weak syllables. Let's get back to our example, the word "button": /ˈbʌt·ən/ The last vowel could be dropped: /ˈbʌt·n̩/ But you still need to link the /t/ and the /n/ sounds. It's easier to stop the air in your throat and quickly direct it through your nose for the /n/: /ˈbʌʔ·n̩/ That's essentially how the glottal 'T' sound works. Now let's find out how to make this sound. 1. First, we'll learn to link the "regular" 'T' sound and the /n/ consonant, without a vowel in between. Split the word "button" into two parts and pronounce them separately. Do it as slowly as you need. Don't rush it at this point: /ˈbʌt/ - /n/, /ˈbʌt/ - /n/, /ˈbʌt/ - /n/ Next, try and link the /t/ and the /n/ by reducing the pause between them. Don't remove the pause completely, though, just make it shorter: /ˈbʌt·n̩/, /ˈbʌt·n̩/, /ˈbʌt·n̩/ 2. Next, let's learn how to make our glottal 'T' sound. We'll start by doing a small exercise to catch or stop the air in your throat, using the common American expression: "uh-oh." Learning this will help you to make the glottal 'T' in the next step. Make sure that you pause between the sounds when you say "uh-oh." You can do this by holding your breath for a moment with the muscles of your throat. Try it: "uh-oh," "uh-oh," "uh-oh." 3. Now we'll replace the /t/ in the word "button" with a glottal 'T.' We'll pronounce the glottal 'T' the same way as we did with "uh-oh." Here's how you do it: • First, stop and hold the air in your throat on the glottal 'T.' • Then make the /n/ sound Don't forget to leave a short pause between the glottal 'T' and the /n/ sound. If you pronounce them too quickly, it'll sound wrong. Let's try saying the word "button" using the same melody as in "uh-oh." [Pronunciation exercise] • button • accountant • beaten • bitten • botany • brighten • certain • cotton • curtain • eaten • fatten • flatten • forgotten • fountain • frighten • gotten • Hilton • important • kitten • Latin • maintenance • mittens • mountain • mutton • remittance • rotten • satin • smitten • sweeten • written
Views: 57173 Sounds American
'TH': Consonant Sound / ð / as in "this"- American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn how to pronounce consonant sound /ð/ used in words like "them," "brother," or "though." Improve your American accent with two phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the /ð/ consonant sound in commonly used words. Check if you can find a surprise bonus at the end of the video! Quick links: • How to make the consonant sound /ð /: 01:16 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 03:23 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 05:21 • Facts about the /ð/: 06:40 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #FricativeSounds ► Consonant Sound /f/ as in "fun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05f62-73nrY ► Consonant Sound /v/ as in "very" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5Oro6v0klg ► Consonant Sound /s/ as in "sun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hWPXaPXrnQ ► Consonant Sound /z/ as in "zoo" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky7Jh9Bbjts ► Consonant Sound /ʃ/ as in "show" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wINb4HFguck ► Consonant Sound /ʒ/ as in "vision" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8ImSmVOSVA ► Consonant Sound /θ/ as in "think" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qC0l6GQZtM4 ► Consonant Sound /ð/ as in "this" - this video ► Consonant Sound /h/ as in "home" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dV6At0g4n78 ► The Shocking Truth About Long And Short English Vowels https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQa9w__GqLc ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /ð/, as in the word "this." You can also hear this sound in words like "than", "there", "other" or "mother." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /ð/ - for this sound. The English /ð/ sound occurs in less than 10% of the world languages and it's not present in the majority of European and Asian languages. Therefore, this sound can be challenging for those non-native English speakers who don't have it in their native languages. They often distort it or replace it with more familiar sounds, such as /z/, /d/, /v/, or /θ/. Keep watching to learn how to pronounce the /ð/ sound and practice it in words. First, let's find out how to make this sound. This sound is the voiced counterpart of the voiceless /θ/. This means that it's made the same way, but with adding a voice. Slightly open your mouth and put the tip of your tongue between your front teeth. Note that the tip of your tongue may gently touch the bottom of your upper front teeth. Now blow air over your tongue making a noise. The stream of air should flow between your upper teeth and the tongue. Note that the /ð/ is a voiced consonant sound, so you need to add your voice when pronouncing it. Let's try saying it: /ð/, /ð/, /ð/. Here are a few common mistakes that people make when pronouncing the /ð/: 1. Not pushing the tongue forward enough or pressing the tip of the tongue against the upper front teeth. This way you'll make a consonant that sounds more like a /z/. - Put the tip of your tongue between your upper and bottom front teeth. 2. Stopping the airflow with the tip of the tongue. The /ð/ sound gets distorted and sounds more like /d/ or even /t/. - /ð/ is a continuous sound; so keep the airstream flowing. You should be able to stretch the /ð/ out: /ð- ð- ð- ð/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let's practice the /ð/ sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Make sure you repeat each word after the speaker, you'll be surprised how fast your pronunciation improves. Let's begin. • than • that • the • their • them • then • there • these • they • this • those • though • thus • another • bathe Let's pause for a second and check on how you're making the /ð/ sound. The tip of your tongue should be between your teeth. The sound is made from the friction in the stream of air flowing between your tongue and the teeth. Don't forget to add your voice. Let's continue practicing. [Pronunciation exercise] • bother • breathe • brother • either • father • further • gather • leather • mother • northern • other • rather • smooth • together • weather You're done! Congratulations! BTW, if you count all the words with the consonant sound /ð/, there won't be many of them. We're crazy enough to know that it's less than one percent of all English words. However, most of them are function words; and function words are the most frequently used ones in American English. So the consonant sound /ð/ is present in practically every sentence. You probably want to go back and practice now :) Don't be shy, leave us a comment if you have any questions. We love your comments! Stay tuned and don't forget to subscribe!
Views: 80019 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / ɔ / as in "on" - American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn how to pronounce vowel sound / ɔ/ used in words like "bought," "dog," or "call." Improve your American accent with exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / ɔ / vowel sound in everyday words. Find about the essential spelling rules for the / ɔ/ vowel. Enjoy a surprise bonus at the end of the video! :) Quick Links: • How to make the /ɔ/ sound: 0:54 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:13 • Most common spelling for the sound /ɔ/: 4:27 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #BackVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ►Vowel sound /oʊ/, as in "go": https://youtu.be/4kPJLHiiGdU ►Vowel sound /ɑ/, as in "got": https://youtu.be/R5CY1UniS68 ►Contrasting sounds /oʊ/ vs /ɔ/, as in "low" and "law": https://youtu.be/ZEqiQgoHgGo [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American vowel sound /ɔ/, as in the word "on." You can also hear this sound in words like "off," "cause," "all," or "saw." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol — /ɔ/ — for this sound. The /ɔ/ can be hard to reproduce for many people and it often gets mispronounced. Keep watching to learn how to avoid shortening this vowel and to practice it in words. Let's find out how to make this sound. OK, to pronounce the /ɔ/ sound, you should focus on the position of your jaw, lips, and tongue. Open your mouth as wide as possible, and round your lips. Flatten your tongue and pull it back. Place your tongue very low in your mouth. The tip of your tongue should be touching the back of your bottom front teeth. Remember, the /ɔ/ is a very open sound, so your jaw should be as open as possible. Let's try saying it: /ɔ/, /ɔ/, /ɔ/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let's practice this sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word, if you want to. Let's begin. • all • ball • blog • boss • bought • broad • brought • call • called • caught • cause • claw • cloth • cost • cough • coughed • crawl • cross • dawn • dog • Don's • draw • fall • fault • fog • fought • frog • frost • gall • golf You're done! Congratulations! By the way, did you know that the /ɔ/ sound is represented by the letter 'o' in only 30% of cases? More on the spelling: most often, the /ɔ/ sound is written as the letter 'o,' as in the word "on." In the rest of the words with this sound, it's written as the combination of letters 'au,' as in the word "cause," as a single letter 'a,' as in the word "water," and also as the following combination of letters: 'al,' as in the word "call," 'aw,' as in the word "saw," 'ou,' as in the word "thought," and 'oa,' as in the word "broad." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 76934 Sounds American
Advanced American Pronunciation Exercise for / r / and / l / sounds, as in "curriculum"
 
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Learn how to pronounce consonant sounds /r/ and /l/ in one word with an advanced pronunciation exercise. Practice pronunciation of words like "reply," "probably," "electricity," or "classroom" that are used in regular daily conversations. Improve your American pronunciation with the help of phonetic exercise recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Introduction: 0:09 • Pronunciation exercise: 0:53 Related videos: ► Consonant Sound / r / as in "run"- American English Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/sWH0vb ► Consonant Sound / l / as in "let"- American English Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/74x2yP ► Pray or Play? Rain or Lane? American English Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/SV9e3w ► Top 200 Most Common English Words with American Accent: Part 1 https://goo.gl/wnqVI7 ► Top 200 Most Common English Words with American Accent: Part 2 https://goo.gl/Z4uUp5 ► 100 English Homophones with American Accent https://goo.gl/MEyMgK ► Contrasting Sounds: Pronunciation Exercises (playlist) https://goo.gl/T3Jo6u ► Pronunciation of Vowel Sounds (playlist): https://goo.gl/jtRMF9 Subscribe to Sounds American Channel: https://goo.gl/N4k8Ji [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. This is an advanced exercise to fine tune your pronunciation of the American sounds /r/ and /l/. Pronunciation of the American /r/ sound is tricky for the majority of non-native English speakers. The /l/ consonant can be challenging as well, especially for those people who don't have this sound in their native language. In our previous videos, we've already practiced these sounds. The next step toward speaking with an American accent is practicing them in words with BOTH /r/ & /l/. You'll likely find it difficult, but you'll love the results. [Pronunciation exercise] This is how it works. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. Repeat each word after the speaker. Go slowly and try to copy the pronunciation as best you can. Pause if you need more time. Let's begin. • relax • reply • rifle • truly • rattle • really • relief • drizzle • laundry • problem • rapidly • realize • relieve • replace • trouble • wrestle • bracelet • electric • probable • probably • relation • reliable • religion • republic • slippery • sprinkle • struggle • triangle • tricycle • agreeable • classroom • gradually • curriculum • electronic • playground • republican • resolution • unfriendly • electricity • responsible You're done! Congratulations! Take a break, get some rest and come back soon. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 17929 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / eɪ / as in "make" - American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn how to pronounce the /eɪ/ vowel sound. Practice making the /eɪ/ sound used in words like "cake," "baby," or "wait." Improve your accent with pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Find out about the most frequent spelling rules for the /eɪ/ vowel sound. Find a Magic phrase in this video :). Quick links: • How to make the /eɪ/ sound: 1:02 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:20 • Most common spelling for the sound /eɪ/: 4:34 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #FrontVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel sound /ɪ/, as in "it": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok_HG-0lNCA ► Vowel sound /ɛ/, as in "bed": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLG3cCLcNiI ► Contrasting sounds /eɪ/ vs /ɛ/, as in "taste" and "test": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29AKpIou3kM (THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we’re going to talk about the American vowel sound /eɪ/, as in the word “make.” You can also hear this sound in words like "take," "day," "wait" or "eight." We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /eɪ/ - for this sound. Let's do a quick test. Read this phrase aloud: "A snail takes a late train" Every word in this phrase has the /eɪ/ sound. If you’re not quite sure you made this sound correctly, keep watching. OK. To pronounce the /eɪ/ vowel, you should focus on the correct position of your lips and tongue. Partially open your mouth, spread your lips wide and make them tense. Raise the middle of your tongue to the roof of your mouth and push it to the front. The tip of your tongue should be down, just behind your bottom front teeth. Remember, the /eɪ/ is a tense sound, so your lips and your tongue should be very tense. Your jaw should be partially lowered. Now, let's pronounce this sound: /eɪ/, /eɪ/, /eɪ/. Now, let's practice this sound in some words. You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word, if you want to. Let' begin. [Pronunciation exercise] • able • ace • ache • age • aid • aim • ate • babe • baited • bake • baked • base • basis • bathe • bay • behave • beige • blade • blame • blaze • bracelet • braided • brain • brake • brave • break • cable • cage • cake • came You're done! Congratulations! The /eɪ/ is one of the major vowel sounds of American English, and it’s also the pronunciation of the first letter of the English alphabet. So, when you hear the /eɪ/ sound, you can assume that it should be spelled with the letter 'a.' And you will be right, but only 73% of the time. The remaining 27% is divided by the following combination of letters: 'ai,' as in "wait," 'ay,' as in "day," 'ei,' as in "eight" or 'ea,' as in "break." We can’t see a pattern either. :) Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 60579 Sounds American
R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɝ / as in "first"- American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn how to pronounce R-colored vowel sound / ɝ/ used in words like "work," "girl," or "early". Improve your American accent with two phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / ɝ/ consonant sound in everyday words. Quick Links: • What are R-colored vowels: 0:54 • How to pronounce /ɝ/: 03:00 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 04:30 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 06:47 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #RColoredVowels ► R-Colored Vowel Sounds Overview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJnrTGH3aXo ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɝ / as in "first": this video ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɚ / as in "after": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzNRoSGBh44& ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɪr / as in "hero": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0bkG5ZfzH4 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɛr / as in "chair": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjurI7xtCjE ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɑr / as in "car": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6E2L2vLH78 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɔr / as in "sport": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbDrxmP4_S4 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / aɪr / as in "fire": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdV7RymsiMY ► Consonant Sound / r / as in "run": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5a2-KuHkBU ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& [ THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we're going to talk about the American r-colored vowel /ɝ/, as in the word "first". You can also hear this sound in words like "girl," "her," "learn" or "word". We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /ɝ/ - for this sound. American English is known for its r-colored vowels. You can't speak like an American if you don't know how to pronounce them correctly. So, what exactly are the r-colored vowels? Let's take these two words: [fist] [first]. Their spellings differ by only one letter: the letter 'r'. However, there's a dramatic difference as to how they're pronounced. Listen: /fɪst/ - /fɝst/. Did you notice that the vowel sounds are different? The vowel you hear in the word "fist" is the /ɪ/ sound and the vowel in the word "first" is the /ɝ/ sound. Let's take a closer look at how the word "first" is spelled. See how the consonant 'r' comes after the letter 'i'? In American English when the 'r' follows a vowel in the same syllable, it forms a new sound, called an r-colored vowel. In the word "first," this r-colored vowel is pronounced as /ɝ/. Note, that the /ɝ/ is not a variation of the /ɪ/ vowel or the /r/ consonant. It's a distinct sound of American English. Check out a few more pairs of words. • "lean" - "learn" • "bun" - "burn" • "he" - "her" • "won" - "word" Did you notice what these words have in common? Despite being spelled with different vowel letters, these words have the same r-colored vowel sound:/ɝ/. Also, note, that the /ɝ/ is used in stressed syllables ONLY. What happens in "weak" syllables, like in the word "teacher"? The /ɝ/ has a "weak" counterpart, the r-colored vowel /ɚ/, but we'll talk about this sound in our next video. And now let's focus on how to make the /ɝ/ sound. OK. Pronunciation of the r-colored vowel /ɝ/ is very similar to the /r/ consonant. To make the /ɝ/ sound, open your mouth a little and leave your lips neutral or round them slightly. The /ɝ/ is a tense vowel sound, so your tongue, mouth and throat should be tense when you pronounce it. Raise the front of your tongue toward the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth, but don't touch it. Next: curl back the tip of your tongue. Now slightly lower the center of your tongue and raise its back. Note that your tongue should be very tense. Remember, the tip of your tongue should be curled back and it should never touch the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Now, let's try saying it: /ɝ/, /ɝ/, /ɝ/. Now, let's practice the /ɝ/ sound in some words: • bird • burst • clerk • curl • curve • dirt • earth • firm • fur • heard • learn • nurse • pearl • purse • serve • shirt • sir • turn • work Pronunciation exercise 2 • world • attorney • certain • circumstance • courage • dessert • encourage • furniture • hurricane • internal • journey • nervous • observe • perfect • personal • purpose • research • service • thirsty • universe • version Let's summarize what we've covered in this video: • In American English, any time in any word, when you see a vowel followed by the letter 'r' in the same syllable, you have an r-colored vowel sound. • The r-colored vowel sound /ɝ/, as in the word "first" or "circle" occurs only in stressed syllables. • The /ɝ/ has a weak version, the r-colored vowel /ɚ/, as in the word "teacher" or "color" that is used in unstressed syllables.
Views: 83558 Sounds American
Vowel Sound / oʊ / as in "go" - American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn how to pronounce vowel sound / oʊ / used in words like "home," "know," or "coat." Improve your American accent with exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / oʊ / vowel sound in everyday words. Find about the essential spelling rules for the / oʊ / vowel. Quick links: • How to make the /oʊ/ sound: 1:07 • Pronunciation exercise: 2:24 • Most common spelling for the sound /oʊ/: 4:38 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #BackVowels ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ►Vowel sound /ɔ/, as in "on": https://youtu.be/pr_KAu-_Hmo ►Vowel sound /ɑ/, as in "got": https://youtu.be/R5CY1UniS68 ►Contrasting sounds /oʊ/ vs /ɔ/, as in "low" and "law": https://youtu.be/ZEqiQgoHgGo [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, VIETNAMESE, AND KOREAN SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American vowel sound /oʊ/, as in the word "go." You can also hear this sound in words like "so," "snow," "coat," or "though." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol — /oʊ/— for this sound. Most non-native English speakers easily distinguish the /oʊ/ sound, but some distort it in speech. Read this phrase aloud: "A ghost hopes for a home". If you feel you may have mispronounced this vowel sound, keep watching to learn how to fix this. OK, to pronounce the /oʊ/ sound, you should focus on the correct position of your jaw, lips, and tongue. Partially open your mouth. Round your lips and make them tense, then pull them in a tighter circle. Pull your tongue back and tense it. Remember, the /oʊ/ is a tense sound, so your lips and tongue should be very tense. Your jaw should be partially lowered. Let's try saying it: /oʊ/, /oʊ/, /oʊ/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let's practice this sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word if you want to. Let's begin. • blow • boast • boat • bold • bolt • bone • both • bowl • broke • chose • close • clothes • coach • coal • coast • coat • cold • colt • comb • crow • don't • dope • dough • doze • drove • euro • float • flow • foam • fold You're done! Congratulations! By the way, the /oʊ/ sound is most often represented by the letter 'o,' so when you hear this sound, you may assume that it should be written with this letter. More on the spelling: The /oʊ/ sound is written as the letter 'o' in 80% of cases. The remaining 20% are split between the following combination of letters: 'ow,' as in the word "snow," 'oa,' as in the word "coat," 'ou,' as in the word "though," and 'ew,' as in the word "sew." We, too, like the spelling of the last combination! :). Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 40480 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / d / as in "dog" – American English Pronunciation
 
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The /d/ sound is familiar to many non-native English speakers and its pronunciation may seem fairly easy. However, the American /d/ is not that simple. Depending on its position in a word, it may be aspirated or unaspirated. In this video, you'll learn pronunciation rules for the /d/ consonant. You'll practice making this sound with several pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Review of the /d/ consonant: 0:36 • How to make the /d/ sound: 01:43 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 02:35 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 04:44 • Pronunciation exercise 3: 06:32 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #StopSounds ►Stop Sounds Overview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFPbLcUCraQ ► Consonant Sound / p / as in "pie" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_n_rUKQSew& ► Consonant Sound /b/ as in "boy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbCOXRz7Uf8 ► Consonant Sound /t/ as in "toy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLlotV_0dRI& ► Consonant Sound Flap 'T' /t̬/ as in "water" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9b-UIkuwOdU ► Consonant Sound Glottal 'T' /ʔ/ as in "button" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vabg-EUHOQk ► Consonant Sound /k/ as in "key" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxrveu6yu6E& ► Consonant Sound /g/ as in "gift" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP5XKYvxe0Q [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, CHINESE, JAPANESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /d/, as in the word "dog." You can also hear this sound in words like "doll," "bird," "dad" or "buddy." We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /d/ - for this sound. The /d/ is one of the six consonants that belong to the stop sounds category. Let's start with reviewing what we learned in the Stops Sounds Overview video. The /d/ is made by stopping the air with the tip of your tongue at the alveolar ridge. The /d/ is a voiced sound. It has a voiceless counterpart, the consonant sound /t/. As with all stop sounds, aspiration is important for the pronunciation of the /d/ consonant. The /d/ is made with a slight puff of air at the beginning of words and stressed syllables. At the end of words, the /d/ follows the final stop rule and is not aspirated. Check out a few examples: • "day," "address," "do" • "bed," "grade, " "road." Now that we've covered the basics, let's find out how to make this sound. Slightly open your mouth and leave your lips in a neutral position. Now, you have to stop the air in your mouth. This is how you do that: Place the tip of your tongue on the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Now, stop the air with the tip of your tongue and then release it with a small puff. Remember, the /d/ is a voiced sound, so you need to add your voice. Let’s try making it: /d/, /d/, /d/. Now, let’s do some pronunciation exercises; we'll start with the /d/ at the beginning of words. Remember that the /d/ should be voiced and slightly aspirated. Try to practice as many words as possible, this is the most important part of the whole lesson. Let’s begin! • daily • damage • dance • dark • daughter • deal • delight • design • desk • dessert • dew • dial • dirt • discover • dismiss • doctor • dollar • drugstore • during • dust Let’s pause here for a second and review the final stop rule. When the stop sounds are found at the end of words, they are pronounced without a puff of air. As you may have already guessed, that's what we'll practice with the words in the next group. • add • afraid • avoid • card • child • cold • coward • crowd • field • food • glad • gold • hard • hood • kind • loud • wild • wood • world • yard Awesome! Now let's practice pronouncing words with more than one /d/ sound. Your challenge is to determine if you should or should not aspirate the /d/. Hint: listen carefully to how the words are pronounced. • dad (the first /d/ is aspirated, the second /d/ is not aspirated) • daddy (the first /d/ is aspirated, the second /d/ is not aspirated) • decide (the first /d/ is aspirated, the second /d/ is not aspirated) • decided (the first and the second /d/ sounds are aspirated, the third /d/ is not aspirated) • deduct (both /d/ sounds are aspirated) • deed (the first /d/ is aspirated, the second /d/ is not aspirated) • demand (the first /d/ is aspirated, the second /d/ is not aspirated) • dependable (both /d/ sounds are aspirated) • cardboard (both /d/ sounds are not aspirated) • childhood (both /d/ sounds are not aspirated) • extended (the first /d/ is aspirated, the second /d/ is not aspirated) • hundred (the first /d/ is aspirated, the second /d/ is not aspirated) • independence (both /d/ sounds are aspirated) • roadside (both /d/ sounds are not aspirated) • standard (the first /d/ is aspirated, the second /d/ is not aspirated)
Views: 25332 Sounds American
R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɚ / as in "after"- American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn how to pronounce R-colored vowel sound / ɚ/ used in words like "enter," "color," "dollar" or "nature." Improve your American accent with phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / ɚ / sound in everyday words. Quick links: ∙ How to make the / ɚ /: 01:53 ∙ Pronunciation exercise 1: 03:23 ∙ Pronunciation exercise 2: 05: 37 ∙ Most common spelling for / ɚ /: 07:18 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #RColoredVowels ► R-Colored Vowel Sounds Overview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJnrTGH3aXo ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɝ / as in "first": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ppOrwjvslc& ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɚ / as in "after": this video ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɪr / as in "hero": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0bkG5ZfzH4 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɛr / as in "chair": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjurI7xtCjE ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɑr / as in "car": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6E2L2vLH78 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɔr / as in "sport": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbDrxmP4_S4 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / aɪr / as in "fire": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdV7RymsiMY ► Consonant Sound / r / as in "run": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5a2-KuHkBU ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& [ THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we’re going to talk about the American r-colored vowel /ɚ/, as in the word "after". You can also hear this sound in words like "enter", "color", "dollar" or "nature". We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /ɚ/ - for this sound. In our previous video we began exploring the American r-colored vowels. Here’s a summary of what we’ve covered: • In American English, any time in any word, when you see a vowel followed by the letter 'r' in the same syllable, you have an r-colored vowel sound. • The r-colored vowel sound /ɝ/, as in the words "first," "burn," "learn," or "word" can be spelled with different vowel letters and the letter ‘r’. • The /ɝ/ occurs only in stressed syllables. But what happens in unstressed syllables? The r-colored vowel sound /ɝ/ has a weak version, the sound /ɚ/, which is used in unstressed syllables. Its pronunciation is almost the same as of the tense /ɝ/, but the /ɚ/ is a relaxed r-colored vowel. Some linguists consider them to be the tense and the weak versions of the same sound. So, let’s find out how to make the relaxed /ɚ/ sound. OK. Pronunciation of the r-colored vowel /ɚ/ is very similar to the /ɝ/ vowel or the /r/ consonant. To make the /ɚ/ sound, open your mouth a little and leave your lips neutral or round them slightly. The /ɚ/ is a weak sound, so your tongue and throat should be relaxed. Raise the front of your tongue toward the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth, but don’t touch it. Next: curl back the tip of your tongue. Now slightly lower the center of your tongue and raise its back. Note, that your tongue should be relaxed. Remember, the tip of your tongue should be curled back and it should never touch the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Now, let’s try saying it: /ɚ/, /ɚ/, /ɚ/. [Pronunciation exercise 1] Now, let’s practice the /ɚ/ sound in some words. You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker and try to copy the pronunciation as much as you can. Let’s begin. • answer • author • better • border • butter • cellar • center • clever • collar • dinner • doctor • eager • editor • error • favor • figure • future • gather • hammer • honor Let’s pause here for a second and check on how you are making the /ɚ/ sound. The tip of your tongue should be curled back and raised towards the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Your tongue and your throat should be relaxed. [Pronunciation exercise 2] Let’s continue practicing. • bakery • comfort • coward • eastern • effort • energy • forward • general • lizard • memory • modern • natural • operate • pattern • percent • perfect • perhaps • upward • western • yogurt You’re done! Congratulations! By the way, did you know that most of the time, the /ɚ/ is represented by the combination of letters ‘er’, as in the word "writer" or "teacher"? However, the /ɚ/ can be written with any vowel letter followed by the ‘r’. And this can be really confusing for non-native speakers. Here’re some words with the /ɚ/ sound that are often mispronounced: • dollar • color • author • doctor • nature • future • mayor • honor • favor • error • editor Thanks for watching! Let us know if you liked this video! Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 59652 Sounds American
R-Сolored Vowel Sounds Overview - American English Pronunciation
 
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The R-colored vowels are the characteristic feature of American English. Nearly every fourth English word has an R-colored vowel. Imagine how much your foreign accent may stand out if you mispronounce them. This video is an overview of the American R-colored sounds. We'll cover each sound in detail in our next videos. Quick Links: • R-colored vowels definition: 00:22 • Spelling for R-colored vowels: 02:36 • How R-colored vowels are made: 03:54 • Summary: 06:10 Related Links: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #RColoredVowels ► R-Colored Vowel Sounds Overview: this video ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɝ / as in "first": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ppOrwjvslc& ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɚ / as in "after": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzNRoSGBh44& ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɪr / as in "hero": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0bkG5ZfzH4 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɛr / as in "chair": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjurI7xtCjE ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɑr / as in "car": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6E2L2vLH78 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɔr / as in "sport": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbDrxmP4_S4 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / aɪr / as in "fire": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdV7RymsiMY ► Consonant Sound / r / as in "run": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5a2-KuHkBU ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, CHINESE, JAPANESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to review the R-colored vowel sounds. Let's start with a question: what are the R-colored vowel sounds? Here's a definition from Sounds American: In American English, anytime in any word, when you see a vowel followed by the letter 'r' in the same syllable, you have an R-colored vowel sound. For example: • first • fever • fear • fare • far • for • fire In all these words the 'r' follows a vowel, and they occur in one syllable. The sounds /ɝ/, /ɚ/, /ɪr/, /ɛr/, /ɑr/, /ɔr/ and /aɪr/ are the R-colored vowels. The R-colored vowels are the characteristic feature of American English. They also make it very different from British English. If you take 10 thousand English words, about 2,400 of them will have at least one R-colored vowel sound. So, if you mispronounce these sounds, you'll mispronounce every fourth word. Imagine how much your foreign accent may stand out. Unfortunately, this happens very often. There are several reasons for that. First, every R-colored vowel has the /r/ sound in it. The American /r/ is different from the Rs in many other languages. So it's often involuntarily distorted by non-native speakers. Second. You may remember, that there are 12 single vowels and 3 diphthongs in American English. The /r/ creates only 7 R-colored vowels, which makes them a little easier to memorize and learn. However, the spelling of any American English vowel is never easy :). And the R-colored vowels are no exception. Take a look. Here are the various combinations of letters that represent just the 7 R-colored vowels: • These five combinations are pronounced as /ɚ/ in weak syllables. • All of those but one, sound like /ɝ/ in stressed syllables. • And here are the most common spellings for the /ɔr/ sound. • Note that some of them may sound like /ɛr/ in other words. • ...And in some other words - as the R-colored vowel /ɑr/. • No worries, we're almost done. Here's how you can recognize the /ɪr/ sound. • Luckily, the /aɪr/ triphthong is pretty straightforward. It's mostly represented by this combination of letters. This is quite overwhelming and may look crazy. And it often is. But that's how English works. No wonder that almost all non-native speakers distort and confuse the R-colored vowels, even if their English is really good. So if you want to make just one major improvement in your American pronunciation, start with the R-colored vowels. Now, let's get more familiar with these sounds. So, each R-colored vowel has the /r/ sound. But how exactly are the R-colored vowels made? This is what happens: the /r/ sound merges with a preceding vowel sound and forms a new R-colored vowel. Take a look: The /ɪr/ is made by merging the /ɪ/ and the /r/: /ɪr/. The /ɛr/ is made by merging the /ɛ/ and the /r/: /ɛr/. The /ɑr/ is made by merging the /ɑ/ and the /r/: /ɑr/. The /ɔr/ is made by merging the /ɔ/ and the /r/: /ɔr/. These vowels are diphthongs, as they are formed by merging two sounds into one. The /aɪr/, however, is made by merging the two sounds of the diphthong /aɪ/ and the /r/ into one sound. So it's a triphthong: /aɪr/.
Views: 19387 Sounds American
Consonant Sound Dark L as in "call" – American English Pronunciation
 
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The "dark" L is only a variation of the /l/ sound and not a distinct consonant. Thus, if you only pronounce the "regular" L, you'll still sound pretty much like an American. Watch this video in case "pretty much" is not good enough for you. Quick Links: • "Dark" L vs "regular" L: 0:45 • How to pronounce the "dark" L: 02:03 • Typical mistake (the "soft" L): 05:23 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 06:43 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 08:28 • Pronunciation exercise 3: 09:52 • Vowel sounds before the /l/: 11:59 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #LiquidSounds ► Consonant Sound /l/ as in "let" https://youtu.be/JamM8TgB_AA ► Consonant Sound /r/ as in "run" https://youtu.be/q5a2-KuHkBU [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the "dark" L, as in the word "call." You can also hear this sound in words like "tool," "gold," "full" or "fault." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /ɫ/ - for this sound. Let's get back to our examples Now, listen to these words pronounced with the "regular" L and compare. Can you hear any difference? Let's do it again! Can you hear any difference now? We can't either. And this is TOTALLY fine. The "dark" and the "regular" 'L' sound almost the same. The "dark" L is only a variation of the /l/ sound and not a distinct consonant. And to be honest, that's all that most people need to know about the "dark" L. But if you don't have more important things to do, keep watching. And you know what? We actually won't be using the dark /ɫ/ symbol. It's never used in dictionaries and we like to keep things simple. Before we get into the "dark" L discussion, let's recall how to make the regular /l/ sound. Here you go: The /l/ is pronounced with the tip of your tongue touching the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. The back of your tongue is lowered. The /l/ is made with air passing through the mouth around the sides of the tongue like a liquid: /l/. By the way, this is why it's called a "liquid" consonant. OK. Now let's try to pronounce the /l/ in a slightly different way. This time keep the tip of your tongue a little lower so that it doesn't touch the alveolar ridge. The back of your tongue, on the contrary, should be a little higher. Let's try saying it: /ɫ/, /ɫ/, /ɫ/. Have you got it? Congratulations, you've just nailed the "dark" L sound! Hold on, we're not done yet. Here's the tricky part: there's no strict distinction between the "regular" and the "dark" 'L' in American English. Instead, there are many degrees of darkness. And we do love how this sounds :). The darkness of the 'L' depends on its position in a word and is adjusted by the tip and the back of your tongue. The lower the tip of your tongue, the darker the 'L' you get. Now, the question is: when should you and shouldn't you make your 'L' dark? This is actually pretty simple: always check the sound before the 'L'. • If it's one of the back vowel sounds, like in the words "tool," "full," "gold," and "fault," pronounce the darkest /l/ possible. The thing is, when you make the back vowel, your tongue is already pulled back, so it's easier to make the "dark" 'L': "tool," "full," "gold," "fault." • If it's one of the central or front vowels, like in the words "deal," "mail," "tell," or "final" pronounce the /l/ that's slightly darker than the regular one. It's okay to gently touch your alveolar ridge: "deal," "mail," "tell," "final." • Now, what happens when there's a consonant before the 'L', or the 'L' is at the beginning of a word or a syllable? Correct, in that case, pronounce your regular L sound: "play," "clean," "light," or "look." At this point, you may wonder what's going on in the red area. This is to show you one of the most typical mistakes that people make when pronouncing the /l/ sound. There is the /ɭ/ sound, also known as the "Soft 'L'", which exists in several languages but doesn't exist in American English. The "Soft 'L'" is pronounced with the tip of your tongue curled back to your palate, and this is NOT how you make any of the American 'L' sounds! Remember, if you pronounce the soft 'L' instead of the /l/ sound, it'll seriously affect your American accent. [Pronunciation exercise 1] • bold • all • sold • gold • fold • bowl • pull • vault • told • goal • bull • salt • ball • cool • pool [Pronunciation exercise 2] • salad • health • adult • bill • color • fail • college • gallon • email • cereal • feel • bulb • build • belt • deal [Pronunciation exercise 3] • place • leaf • look • lady • black • old • wall • police • flat • golf • golden • else • small • tall • role • model • class • hall • crawl • wolf
Views: 27160 Sounds American
Stop Sounds Overview – American English Pronunciation
 
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80% of English words have at least one stop sound, so if you want to speak like an American, you need to pronounce them correctly. In this video, you can learn little-known aspects of the American stop sounds pronunciation, such as aspiration, flapping, glottal sound, and many others. Quick Links: • What are the consonant sounds? 0:20 • What are the stop consonant sounds? 0:53 • Types of stop sounds: 01:14 • Voicing: 2:58 • Aspiration (making a puff of air): 04:01 • Final Stop Rule: 05:05 • Vowel length rule: 06:04 • Positional variations: 07:37 • Flap 'T': 07:58 • Glottal 'T': 08:39 • Dropped /t/: 09:22 • Summary: 10:00 • Stop sounds quiz: 11:19 ------------------------------------------------------------- Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #StopSounds ► Consonant Sound / p / as in "pie" https://goo.gl/1u5TcV ► Consonant Sound /b/ as in "boy" https://goo.gl/iazyT2 ► Consonant Sound /t/ as in "toy" https://goo.gl/33QRBa ► Consonant Sound /d/ as in "dog" https://goo.gl/73GE7g ► Consonant Sound /k/ as in "key" https://goo.gl/NVRmpm ► Consonant Sound /g/ as in "gift" https://goo.gl/xHRNu4 [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES!] -------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to review the stop consonant sounds. Before we start, let's talk about what the consonant sounds are. Here's a definition from Sounds American: A consonant sound is a speech sound in which the air stream is at least partially blocked when leaving your mouth. For example, look at how the air is blocked by the tip of your tongue and flows around it when you make the /l/ sound, as in the word "let." Now, onto the stops sounds. This is the second largest group of consonant sounds in American English. Why are they called the stop sounds? Because when you pronounce them, the air stream is first stopped - or blocked - in your mouth and then released with a puff. For example, the /p/ sound as in the word "pie" is a stop consonant. Types of Stop Sounds In this introduction to the stop consonants, we'll cover the basics. In our future videos, we'll talk about each stop sound in detail and provide practice exercises. There are six distinct stop sounds in American English. They differ by how and where you stop the air in your mouth. • You can stop the air with your lips and make the /p/ or /b/ sounds, like in the words "pie" and "buy." • You can also stop the air with the tip of your tongue at the alveolar ridge. If you do so, you'll make the /t/ or /d/ sounds, like in the words "ten" and "den." • And finally, you can stop the air with the back of your tongue in your throat and make the /k/ or /g/ sounds, like in the words "kite" and "guy." As you may have noticed, we like charts. Here's one for the stops sounds. See how all the stops are grouped in pairs? Once again, they are grouped by how and where you stop the air in your mouth. • /p/ - /b/ • /t/ - /d/ • /k/ - /g/ Voicing The sounds in the right-hand column are pronounced with your voice. These are the voiced stop sounds. Listen: /b/ , /d/, /g/. The sounds in the left-hand column are pronounced without adding your voice. They are called the voiceless stop sounds. Listen: /p/ , /t/, /k/. Don't confuse the voiced and voiceless sounds, as voicing may change the meaning of words. Compare: • "pay " -- “bay" • "town" -- "down" • "coat" -- "goat" You may also have noticed that the voiceless stop sounds are pronounced with a stronger puff of air. And that leads us to our next topic: Aspiration or Making a Puff of Air Stop sounds exist in every language in the world. What makes American pronunciation of these sounds so special? It's aspiration. Aspiration is actually a big deal in American English. Depending on the position of a stop sound in a word, you either make a puff of air or you don't. Don't worry, there's a rule which is easy to remember. Here it goes: • If a stop sound starts a word or a stressed syllable, it's pronounced with a puff of air. For example, "pay," "pass," "compare." • At the end of most words (and syllables) stop sounds are pronounced without a puff of air. For example, "lap," "sheep," "update." This is called the "final stop" rule. The final stop rule is most often used in conversational speech. Please, note, that if you make a puff of air, you’ll be understood, but you won’t be speaking with an American accent. Compare: • "I like that hat" • "I don't talk like that" Many non-native English speakers believe that Americans drop or swallow the stop sounds at the end of words. That's not quite right. The final stops are always pronounced, just without a puff of air.
Views: 43577 Sounds American
Thin or Thing? Sin or Sing? American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn the difference between the / n / and / ŋ / consonant sounds. Practice pronunciation of the / n / and / ŋ / with minimal pairs exercises using words like "ran" and "rang," "ton" and "tongue," or "lawn" and "long." Improve your American accent with essential pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • How to recognize the /n/ and / ŋ /, cheat sheet: 0:58 • Key distinction b/w the /n/ and / ŋ /: 02:58 • Quiz: can you hear the difference b/w the / n / and the /ŋ /: 01:34 • Pronunciation exercise: 04:06 • Quiz: https://youtu.be/8bKIm60nK80?t=94 • Pronunciation exercise: https://youtu.be/8bKIm60nK80?t=246 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #MinimalPairs ► Consonant Sound / n / as in "nice": https://goo.gl/jNjfsr ► Consonant Sound / ŋ / (NG) as in "thing": https://goo.gl/X14U5c ► Pronunciation of Consonant Sounds (playlist): https://goo.gl/dQrWy2 Subscribe to Sounds American channel: https://goo.gl/SAlzvr [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the Sounds American channel! In this video we'll compare two consonant sounds: /n/ and /ŋ/, as in the words "thin" and "thing." In our previous videos we learned how to make them. Remember the videos for the /n/ sound, as in the word "nice" and the /ŋ/ sound, as in the word "thing"? This time we'll focus on the differences between these two sounds. Many non-native English speakers have difficulty differentiating between the /n/ and the /ŋ/ sounds. Yes, these two can be quite confusing. Here's how you can recognize these sounds in written words. • If you see a word that ends with 'ng,' you have the /ŋ/ sound • If you see the letters 'ng' in the middle of a word, pronounce the 'n' as /ŋ/. • If you see the letter 'n' before the letters 'k' or 'c,' pronounce the 'n' as /ŋ/. • In all other cases, pronounce the letter 'n' as the /n/ sound. That was about spelling. Now let's check how well you can differentiate between the /n/ and the /ŋ/ when you hear them. Here's a quick test. [QUIZ] You'll see a pair of words on the screen and hear only one of them pronounced. For example, "thing." Can you guess what word you heard? Let's try a few more word pairs. How did you do? Don't worry if you didn't get all the words right. You'll improve after doing some pronunciation exercises in a just minute. The /n/ and the /ŋ/ are both nasal consonants, which means that you should pass the air through your nose when you pronounce them. Here's the key distinction between the /n/ and the /ŋ/: Look at the position of the tongue. • For the /n/ sound, the tip of the tongue is placed on the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. • For the /ŋ/ sound the tongue is pulled far back to the throat. Listen and compare: "thin" - "thing." Let's pronounce these sounds one after the other: /n/ - /ŋ/, /n/ - /ŋ/, /n/ - /ŋ/ [Pronunciation exercise] Now that you've reviewed how to make these consonants, let's practice pronouncing these sounds in some words. This is the most important part of your training, so try to go through as many words as possible. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. After that you'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, the first word will have the /n/ consonant sound, and the second will have the /ŋ/ consonant sound. Let's begin! • ban - bang • band - banged • banned - banged • clan - clang • done - dung • fan - fang • gone - gong • kin - king • lawn - long • pan - pang • pin - ping • ran - rang • sin - sing • son - sung • stun - stung • sun - sung • tan - tang • thin - thing • tin - ting • ton - tongue • win - wing • wind - winged You're done! Congratulations! To check how much you've improved, you can do the word pairs test again. Click this link to go back and compare the results. Did you like this exercise? Let us know in the comments what other sounds you would like to practice. We like your suggestions! Thanks for watching! Don't forget to like this video and subscribe to the Sounds American channel!
Views: 31046 Sounds American
How to Pronounce Words with '-s' Endings – American English Pronunciation
 
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Did you know that in English the '-s' ending is pronounced as the /s/ sound only in one word out of four? Most of the time, it should be pronounced as /z/, but many non-native speakers still use the voiceless /s/ sound. That's a very common pronunciation mistake. In this video, you'll find out about the rules for pronunciation of the '-s' and '-es' endings and practice them in words. As always, all pronunciation exercises and instructions are recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Overview: 0:54 • Rules for '-es' ending: • the 's' ending is pronounced as /ɪz/: 01:44 • the '-s' ending is pronounced as /s/: 02:08 • the '-s' ending is pronounced as /z/: 02:21 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 03:34 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 06:25 • Collective nouns, names of groups of animals: 08:25 Related Videos: ► Consonant Sound /s/ as in "sun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hWPXaPXrnQ ► Consonant Sound /z/ as in "zoo" – American English Pronunciation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky7Jh9Bbjts ► Vowel Sound /ɪ/ as in "it"- American English Pronunciation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok_HG-0lNCA [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, JAPANESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] -------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to learn how to pronounce '-s' endings. Take a look at these four words: • cat • dog • zebra • horse Now let's make them plural. Listen to how the '-s' ending is pronounced: • cats • dogs • zebras • horses Did you notice any differences? In these examples, the '-s' ending is pronounced three different ways. Why? Well, because these are different animals. :) Just kidding.:) The pronunciation of the '-s' ending depends on the sound it follows. Take a look. 1. the '-s' ending is pronounced as /s/ after the voiceless consonant /t/ in the word "cats." 2. the '-s' ending is pronounced as /z/ after the voiced consonant /g/ in the word "dogs" and after the vowel /ə/ in the word "zebras." 3. And finally, the 's' ending is pronounced as /ɪz/ after the /s/ sound in the word "horses." It may sound complicated, but it's really not. There's actually a rule. • All you need to do is check the sound before the '-s' ending. • If it's one of the following sounds: /s/ /z/, /ʃ/, /ʒ/, /tʃ/, or /dʒ/, then the '-s' ending is pronounced as /ɪz/. The rest of the time, it works like this: • If the sound before the '-s' ending is a voiceless consonant, then the '-s' is pronounced as /s/. If the sound before the 's' ending is a voiced consonant or a vowel, then the 's' is pronounced as /z/. There's one more thing you'll need to know about this rule. Let's return to the word "horse." It's pronounced with the final /s/ sound. The letter "e" at the end is silent. But when it's plural, the "e" is pronounced as a part of the ending: horses. Here is another example: The word "fox" also ends with the /s/ sound, but it doesn't have the silent letter "e" at the end. So its plural is formed by the ending "-es" that's pronounced as /ɪz/: foxes. As you may have guessed, this works for words that end with the sounds /s/ /z/, /ʃ/, /ʒ/, /tʃ/, or /dʒ/. [Pronunciation exercise 1] Now, let's practice these rules one by one. It'll help you learn them faster. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker. Let's begin. • backs • days • branches • boots • evenings • buses • folks • fires • classes • lights • flowers • edges • looks • friends • faxes • parts • knives • glasses • plants • names • inches • points • potatoes • languages • products • scissors • noises • scientists • towns • washes [Pronunciation exercise 2] Now let's practice random words with '-s' endings. When you see a word on the screen, try and remember which rule applies. • earth's • teardrops • sounds • socks • elements • turns • places • catches • eats • sees • syllables • passes • loves • teaches • notices • Don's • boxes • gives You're done! Congratulations! The '-s' ending rule applies not only to plural nouns, but also possessives and verbs in the third person singular Present Simple tense. Let's go back to our animals. We've already made them plural. Consider what they may be called when they're in a group. Take a look. • A clowder of cats • A pack of dogs • A herd of zebras • A team of horses Awesome, isn't it? We're most certainly NOT going to cover this topic in our next videos. Let us know if you LIKED this video! Share this video with your friends, pets, and relatives! Don't forget to subscribe and stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 12888 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / t / as in "toy" – American English Pronunciation
 
10:08
About one out of three words in English has the /t/ sound. So it's way too common of a sound to be pronounced incorrectly. And to make it correctly you'll need to learn the four different ways that it's pronounced. In this video, you'll learn pronunciation rules for the /t/ consonant. You'll practice making this sound with several pronunciation exercises recorded by a speech-language pathologist specializing in American English pronunciation. Quick Links: • Review of the /t/ consonant: 0:42 • How to make the /t/ sound: 02:51 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 03:39 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 05:44 • Pronunciation exercise 3: 07:25 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #StopSounds ►Stop Sounds Overview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFPbLcUCraQ ► Consonant Sound / p / as in "pie" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_n_rUKQSew& ► Consonant Sound /b/ as in "boy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbCOXRz7Uf8 ► Consonant Sound Flap 'T' /t̬/ as in "water" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9b-UIkuwOdU ► Consonant Sound Glottal 'T' /ʔ/ as in "button" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vabg-EUHOQk ► Consonant Sound /d/ as in "dog" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N73xPe0x79g ► Consonant Sound /k/ as in "key" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxrveu6yu6E& ► Consonant Sound /g/ as in "gift" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP5XKYvxe0Q [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, CHINESE, JAPANESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /t/, as in the word "toy." You can also hear this sound in words like "time," "cat," "stop" or "Scott." We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /t/ - for this sound. The /t/ is one of six consonants in the stop sounds category. The stop sounds are familiar to most people and may seem easy to pronounce. But once you try to pronounce them with an American accent, you’ll find that they're not so easy. Let's find out why and start with reviewing what we learned in the Stops Sounds Overview video. The /t/ is made by stopping the air with the tip of your tongue at the alveolar ridge. The /t/ is a voiceless sound. It has a voiced counterpart, the consonant sound /d/. Remember what's most important for the stops? Correct. It's how they're aspirated. The /t/ is aspirated or, in other words, pronounced with a strong puff of air, at the beginning of words and stressed syllables. At the end of words, the /t/ follows the final stop rule and is not aspirated. As with all voiceless stops, the /t/ is not aspirated after the /s/ sound at the beginning of words. Here are some examples: • "time," "contain," "toy" • 'light," "got," "boat" • "stop, " "still," "street" The /t/ sound has a couple of positional variations. When the /t/ occurs between voiced sounds, it becomes a "flap 'T' sound. When the /t/ is followed by a weak syllable containing the /n/ sound, it may become a "glottal 'T'. Compare: "kit" - "kitten" - "kitty." The flap and the glottal 'T' sounds will be covered in detail in our future videos. As for this video, let's focus on how to pronounce the voiceless /t/ sound. Slightly open your mouth and leave your lips in a neutral position. Now, you have to stop the air. This is how you do that: Place the tip of your tongue on the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Now, stop the air in your mouth with the tip of your tongue and then release it with a strong puff. If you make this sound correctly, you'll hear a burst of air: /t/. Let’s try making this sound: /t/, /t/, /t/. [Pronunciation Exercise 1] Now let’s do some practice exercises. We'll start with the /t/ at the beginning of words. Remember, the initial /t/ is pronounced with a strong puff of air. As usual, you’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Don't skip this part, as practice is essential for improving your accent. Let’s begin! • tea • take • tail • tell • talk • tip • tape • task • teach • tough • town • table • today • Tuesday • tomorrow • technical • telephone • television • tobacco • terrible [Pronunciation Exercise 2] • airport • cart • ticket • seat • belt • blanket • depart • comfort • pilot • jet • flight • height • knot • distant • jacket • equipment • exit • frequent • greet • light [Pronunciation Exercise 3] • stable • staff • stage • stamp • stand • star • steady • steak • steam • step • stereo • still • stomach • stone • storm • straight • strange • strawberry • stripe • style
Views: 26992 Sounds American
100 International Brands with American Accent – American English Pronunciation
 
10:37
In this video, you'll learn how the names of 100 well-known brands are pronounced in America. Hint: it could be quite different from how they are pronounced in their country of origin. You'll practice saying these words with pronunciation exercises recorded by a speech-language pathologist, specializing in accent modification. Quick Links: • Cars and SUVs: 1:21 • Fashion: 3:53 • Food and Drinks: 5:51 • Technology: 7:34 Related Videos: ► 100 Halloween Words with American Accent - American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/hpVikb ► Names of 50 US States with American Accent - American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/hmKijE ► 100 English Homophones with American Accent https://goo.gl/FxE5Jv ► Top 200 Most Common English Words with American Accent: Part 1 https://goo.gl/SAroN6 ► Top 200 Most Common English Words with American Accent: Part 2 https://goo.gl/oPhjy4 [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, CHINESE, JAPANESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we'll learn how to pronounce the names of 100 well-known international brands. On our channel, we always teach you to correctly pronounce words with a General American accent. We also show you common pronunciation mistakes made by non-native English speakers. This time we're going to do something that may seem to be quite the opposite. We'll teach you how the names of 100 international brands are pronounced in America. And it could be quite different from how they are pronounced in their country of origin. BTW, there's even a term for this in linguistics. It's called "Anglicization." This is when foreign words are changed to make them easier to pronounce, spell or understand in English. Actually, in our case it would be "Americanization," but that's a different concept :). Anyway, we want to help you be understood by Americans. [Pronunciation exercise ] This is how we’re going to do that. You’ll see the name of a brand on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Make sure you do it, this is the most important part of this lesson. Let’s begin! 1:21 – – Cars and SUVs 1:46 – Acura 1:52 – Audi 1:56 – BMW 2:01 – Buick 2:06 – Cadillac 2:10 – Chevrolet 2:15 – Chrysler 2:20 – Dodge 2:24 – Ford 2:29 – GMC 2:34 – Honda 2:38 – Hyundai 2:43 – Infiniti 2:48 – Jaguar 2:52 – Jeep 2:57 – Kia 3:01 – Land Rover 3:06 – Lexus 3:11 – Lincoln 3:15 – Mazda 3:20 – Mercedes-Benz 3:25 – Mitsubishi 3:30 – Nissan 3:35 – Porsche 3:39 – Subaru 3:44 – Toyota 3:48 – Volkswagen 3:53 –– Fashion 3:58 – Adidas 4:02 – Armani 4:07 – Burberry 4:12 – Calvin Klein 4:17 – Christian Dior 4:22 – Columbia 4:26 – Converse 4:31 – GAP 4:35 – Gucci 4:40 – H&M 4:45 – Levi's 4:49 – Louis Vuitton 4:54 – Nike 4:59 – OLD NAVY 5:03 – Pandora 5:08 – Polo Ralph Lauren 5:14 – Prada 5:18 – PUMA 5:22 – Reebok 5:27 – Timberland 5:32 – Tommy Hilfiger 5:37 – Under Armour 5:41 – Victoria's Secret 5:46 – Zara 5:51 –– Food and Drinks 5:56 – Cadbury 6:01 – Campbell's 6:05 – Coca-Cola 6:10 – Dr. Pepper 6:15 – Dunkin Donuts 6:20 – Heinz 6:25 – Hershey's 6:29 – Kinder 6:34 – Lay's 6:38 – Mars 6:43 – Mountain Dew 6:48 – Nestlé 6:52 – Nutella 6:57 – Oreo 7:02 – Pepsi 7:06 – Red Bull 7:11 – Reese's 7:16 – Starbucks 7:20 – Trident 7:25 – Wrigley's 7:29 – Yoplait 7:34 –– Technology 7:39 – Adobe 7:43 – Alibaba 7:48 – Amazon 7:53 – Apple 7:57 – Canon 8:02 – Dell 8:06 – eBay 8:11 – Facebook 8:15 – Google 8:20 – Hewlett Packard 8:25 – Huawei 8:29 – IBM 8:34 – Intel 8:39 – Microsoft 8:44 – NETFLIX 8:48 – Nikon 8:53 – Nintendo 8:58 – Nokia 9:03 – Oracle 9:07 – Panasonic 9:12 – Paypal 9:17 – Philips 9:21 – Qualcomm 9:26 – Samsung 9:31 – Sony 9:36 – Toshiba 9:40 – Uber 9:45 – Verizon 9:50 – Youtube You’re done! Congratulations! Are there any brand names that sound different in your language? Let us know in the comments! Click Like if you like this video. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 24178 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / n / as in "nice"- American English Pronunciation
 
07:16
Learn how to pronounce consonant sound /n/ used in words like "name," "next," or "when." Improve your American accent with two phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / n / consonant sound in everyday words. Quick Links: • Common pronunciation problems with the /n/: 01:00 • How to make the consonant sound /n/: 1:42 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 2:44 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 4:41 • Fun fact about the /n/: 6:24 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #NasalSounds ► Consonant Sound / ŋ / (NG) as in "thing": https://goo.gl/C1vLM9 ► Thin or Thing? Sin or Sing? American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/CiYt41 ► Pronunciation of consonant sounds (playlist): https://goo.gl/fYE3xe Subscribe to Sounds American: https://goo.gl/N4k8Ji [ THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we’re going to talk about the American consonant sound /n/, as in the word "nice". You can also hear this sound in words like "now," "open," "nine" or "sunny." We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /n/ - for this sound. The /n/ sound exists in a majority of the world languages and many non-native English speakers typically don’t have any difficulties with this sound. However, sometimes the /n/ gets distorted or confused with other sounds. Here are a few common problems that people have with the /n/ sound: • The /n/ is often confused with the /m/ sound. For example: "then" - "them" • Also, the /n/ is confused with the /ŋ/ sound. Compare: "sin" - "sing" • Another typical problem is that the /n/ is reduced or even dropped at the end of words: "then" - "the" To make sure you know how to pronounce the /n/ like an American, let’s find out how to make it and then practice it in words. To make the /n/ sound correctly, it's important to focus on passing the air through your nose. Let's take a closer look at how to do that: Place the tip of your tongue on the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth. Next: stop the air in your mouth with the tip of your tongue and direct it into your nose. If you make this sound correctly, you should be able to stretch out this sound, like this: /n-n-n-n-n-/ Now, let's try saying it: /n/, /n/, /n/ Now, let's practice the /n/ sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, this is the most important part of the exercise. Let's begin. [Pronunciation exercise] • name • navy • near • neat • neck • need • new • next • nose • note • dawn • done • lane • lawn • open • oven • sign • soon • when • wine [Pronunciation exercise 2] • nine • none • noon • noun • known • linen • onion • union • anyone • cannon • canyon • engine • napkin • nation • lantern • mention • opinion • tension • unicorn • nineteen You're done! Congratulations! Did you know that the /n/ sound is the most frequently used consonant in American English? For instance, in this particular video it's been used 189 times! Sorry, after that last sentence it's now actually 192 times. As for regular daily conversations, you can hear the /n/ in every 4th word. Now you know how important this sound is for your American accent :). Give us a thumbs up if you liked this video! Don't forget to subscribe and stay tuned for more videos!
Views: 23548 Sounds American
Low or Law? Row or Raw? Boat or Bought? American English Pronunciation
 
07:56
Learn the difference between the / oʊ / and / ɔ / vowel sounds. Practice pronunciation of the / oʊ / and / ɔ / with minimal pairs exercises using words like "coast" and "cost," or "coat" and "cought." Improve your American accent with essential pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Do you hear the difference b/w the / oʊ / and / ɔ /? Quiz: 1:06 • Key distinctions b/w the / oʊ / and / ɔ /: 2:20 • Pronunciation exercise: 3:38 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #MinimalPairs ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel Sound / oʊ / as in "go"- American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/ckxjy0 ► Vowel Sound / ɔ / as in "on"- American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/EM1LvR [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, VIETNAMESE, AND CHINESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we'll compare two vowel sounds: /oʊ/ and /ɔ/, as in the words "low" and "law." In our previous videos we've already learned how to make them. Remember the videos for the /oʊ/ sound, as in "go" and the /ɔ/ sound, as in "on"? This time we'll focus on the differences between these two sounds. It's relatively easy to distinguish between the /oʊ/ and the /ɔ/ sounds. However, when these sounds are pronounced, they are frequently confused and distorted. In this video we'll help you fix this by practicing the /oʊ/ and the /ɔ/ sounds by contrasting them in word pairs. [QUIZ] Before we continue, let's check how well you can differentiate between the /oʊ/ and the /ɔ/. You'll see a pair of words on the screen and hear only one of them pronounced. For example, "l*w." Can you guess what word you heard? Let's try a few more word pairs. Don't worry if you couldn't recognize some of the words. Keep watching for instructions and exercises to help you improve. Here are the 2 key distinctions between the /oʊ/ and the /ɔ/: First, look at the lips: • For the /oʊ/ sound, the lips are rounded in a circle and very tense. • For the /ɔ/ sound, the lips are rounded, relaxed and the mouth is open very wide. Second. Pay attention to the tongue: • For the /oʊ/ sound, the tongue is pulled back in your mouth and tensed. • For the /ɔ/ sound, the tongue is pulled back, relaxed and is very low in your mouth. Let's pronounce these sounds one after the other: /oʊ/ - /ɔ/, /oʊ/ - /ɔ/, /oʊ/ - /ɔ/ [Pronunciation exercise] Next you'll need to actually pronounce some words aloud. You didn't think you could get away with just listening, did you? The best way to practice the /oʊ/ and /ɔ/ is to pronounce them in word pairs. So, let's do this. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. After that you'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, the first word will have the tense /oʊ/ vowel sound, and the second will have the relaxed /ɔ/ vowel sound. Let's begin! • boat – bought • bowl – ball • coal – call • coast – cost • coat – cought • cold – called • goal – gall • hole – hall • loan – lawn • low – law • oat – ought • own – on • row – raw • sew – saw • stole - stall You're done! Congratulations! To check, how much you've improved, you can do the word pairs test again. Click this link to go back and compare the results. By the way, did you know that in American English the letter ‘o' can represent at least six different sounds? Most often, it sounds like /ɑ/, as in the words "not" or "box.".. And as /oʊ/, as in the word "no" or "note", also as /ʌ/ , like in "mother" or "love." Sometimes, the letter 'o' can represent the /ɔ/ vowel, as in the words "lost" or "on." It's generally an exception, but this letter could also be the /u/ vowel, as in "who" or "shoe", and even the /ʊ/ as in "wolf" or "woman." Crazy, right? :) Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 44416 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / l / as in "let"- American English Pronunciation
 
07:15
Learn how to pronounce consonant sound /l/ used in words like "late," "clean," or "please." Improve your American accent with two phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / l / consonant sound in everyday words. Enjoy a surprise bonus at the end of the video! Quick links: • How to make the consonant sound /l/: 01:16 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 02:15 • Pronunciation tip: 04:12 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 04:28 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #LiquidSounds ► Consonant Sound Dark L as in "call": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTgYjGXFAkw& ► Consonant Sound /r/ as in "run": https://goo.gl/sWH0vb ► Advanced American Pronunciation Exercise for /r/ and /l/ sounds, as in "curriculum": https://goo.gl/yyiO0Y ► Pray or Play? Rain or Lane? American English Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/SV9e3w ► Pronunciation of American English Vowel Sounds: https://goo.gl/Epg4gV ► Advanced pronunciation exercises. Contrasting Vowels: https://goo.gl/A777MK [ THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /l/, as in the word "let." You can also hear this sound in words like "low," "world," "like" or "place." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /l/ - for this sound. Many non-native English speakers have the /l/ sound in their native language, but there may be subtle differences in how it's pronounced. These people typically are not aware that they have difficulty making the /l/ sound. Other people don't have the /l/ sound in their native language and they're very aware that they can't pronounce the /l/ correctly. They may sometimes confuse the /l/ with the /r/ or replace it with more familiar sounds. Since you're watching this video you may likely fall into one of the categories :). So, let's find out how to make this sound. OK. First, slightly open your mouth. Next, pay attention to the position of your tongue. This is key to making a correct /l/ sound. Touch the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth with the tip of your tongue. If you don't know what the alveolar ridge is, that's where the pointer is right now. Now, lower the back of your tongue. If you make this sound correctly, you should be able to stretch out this sound, like this: /l-l-l-/. Let's try saying it: /l/, /l/, /l/. [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let's practice the /l/ sound in some words. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Make sure you repeat the words after the speaker, - that's the only way to learn to pronounce the /l/ sound correctly. Let's begin. • lack • lady • lag • laid • lair • lake • lamb • lame • lamp • land • lane • lap • last • late • law • lawn • lay • lazy • lead • leaf • leak Let's pause here for a second and check how you're making the /l/ sound. The tip of your tongue should be touching the alveolar ridge behind your upper front teeth and the back of your tongue should be lowered. Let's continue practicing. [Pronunciation exercise] • blog • blow • blue • clam • clap • claw • clay • clip • club • flag • flap • flat • flee • flip • flop • flow • fly • glad • glow • glue You're done! Congratulations! Did you know that there are two variations of the pronunciation of the /l/ sound based on its position in a word? The /l/ at the beginning of a word or before a vowel sound, as in a word "plate," is called a light /l/ and we covered its pronunciation in this video. The /l/ at the end of a word or after a vowel, as in words "pale" or "call," is called a dark /l/. This will be a topic of one of our future videos on the Sounds American channel! Stay tuned and don't forget to subscribe!
Views: 29505 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / p / as in "pie" - American English Pronunciation
 
08:52
The /p/ sound is familiar to most people and its pronunciation may seem fairly easy. Yet the American /p/ is not that simple. There are many ways this sound is pronounced, depending on its position in a word. In this video, you'll learn the American pronunciation of the /p/ sound, including little-known pronunciation rules, such as aspiration and final stop rule. You'll also practice the /p/ sound with pronunciation exercises, professionally recorded by a speech-language pathologist specializing in American English pronunciation (and all around a great guy). Quick links: • Review: 0:53 • How to make the /p/ consonant sound: 02:12 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 02:46 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 05:00 • Pronunciation exercise 3: 06:49 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #StopSounds ► Stop Sounds Overview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFPbLcUCraQ ► Consonant Sound /b/ as in "boy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbCOXRz7Uf8 ► Consonant Sound /t/ as in "toy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLlotV_0dRI ► Consonant Sound Flap 'T' /t̬/ as in "water" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9b-UIkuwOdU ► Consonant Sound Glottal 'T' /ʔ/ as in "button" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vabg-EUHOQk ► Consonant Sound /d/ as in "dog" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N73xPe0x79g ► Consonant Sound /k/ as in "key" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxrveu6yu6E& ► Consonant Sound /g/ as in "gift" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP5XKYvxe0Q [ THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /p/, as in the word "pie." You can also hear this sound in words like "play," "cup," "paper" or "supper." We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /p/ - for this sound. The /p/ is one of six sounds in the stop consonants category. The stop sounds may seem easy to pronounce. But they're more difficult if you try to pronounce them with an American accent. Why? Let's find out. We'll start with reviewing what we learned in the Stops Sounds Overview video. The /p/ is made by stopping the air with your lips. The /p/ is a voiceless sound. It has a voiced counterpart, the consonant sound /b/. Like with all stop consonants, aspiration is important when you pronounce the /p/ sound. The /p/ is made with a strong puff of air at the beginning of words and stressed syllables. At the end of words and syllables, the /p/ follows the final stop rule and is not aspirated. There's one more thing. The /p/ sound is also unaspirated after the /s/ consonant. Check out these examples: • "peak," "repeat," "paper" • "keep," "tape," "update" • "speak," "spring," "spoil' Now let's take a closer look at how to pronounce this sound. First, press your lips together to stop the air in your mouth. Next, part your lips and release the air with a strong puff. If you make this sound correctly, you'll hear a burst of air. Now, let’s try saying it: /p/, /p/, /p/. [Pronunciation Exercise 1] Now, let’s practice. We'll start with the /p/ at the beginning of words. Remember that the /p/ in this position is aspirated, so make sure you pronounce it with a strong puff of air. You already know how the practice works, but just in case, we'll say it again :). You’ll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You’ll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Try to practice as many words as possible, this is the most important part of the whole lesson. Let’s begin! • pack • pad • page • paint • park • part • paw • peace • pet • place • plan • please • plus • point • port • post • prepare • present • puff • put [Pronunciation Exercise 2] Let’s pause here for a second and review the final stop rule: stop sounds at the end of words are made without a puff of air. This is what we'll practice with the next group of words. Let's continue practicing. • cap • cheap • chip • chop • clap • drip • drop • flap • group • gulp • help • jump • keep • map • shape • sharp • shop • sleep • step • swipe [Pronunciation Exercise 3] Awesome! Now let's practice pronouncing words with the /p/ sound following the /s/ sound. Remember to make the /p/ without a puff of air. Here you go. • speak • spear • speech • spell • spend • spent • spider • spill • spin • spit • spite • spoil • spoke • spree • spy You're done! Congratulations! Now that you know how to make the /p/ stop sound, all you need is to practice regularly. This is how you'll improve your American accent. Click Like if you like this video and share it with your friends! Don't forget to subscribe, but more importantly, come back and practice!
Views: 22541 Sounds American
Top 200 Most Common English Words with American Accent: Part 2
 
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Learn how to pronounce 200 most common words with an American accent. Practice pronunciation of words like "school," "country," "help," or "company" that are used in regular everyday conversations. Improve your American pronunciation using phonetic exercise recorded by a professional speech therapist. This is the second part of the Top 200 words videos series. You can find the first part here: https://goo.gl/vHJY8o Quick Links: • Pronuciation exercise: 0:37 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #PronunciationExercises #MostCommonWords ► American English Vowel Sounds Playlist (https://goo.gl/n5afZv) ► Advanced American Pronunciation Exercise for /r/ and /l/ sounds, as in "curriculum": https://goo.gl/yyiO0Y ► 100 English Homophones with American Accent: https://goo.gl/VXhg1D Subscribe to Sounds American: https://goo.gl/N4k8Ji Follow Sounds American on G+: https://plus.google.com/+SoundsAmerican Thanks to our very attentive subscriber Angello we noticed a mistake in transcription for the word "government". The correct transcription for this word is as follows: /ˈɡʌv·ɚn·mənt/. [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we'll learn how to pronounce the 200 most common English words with an American accent. In our previous video we learned how to pronounce the first hundred of the most common words. This time we'll cover the second part of this list. This is a great way to improve your American pronunciation, as these 200 words make up about 80% of typical daily conversations. [Pronunciation exercise] A quick reminder on how this exercise works: you'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. Repeat each word after the speaker. Make sure you actually pronounce the words aloud, - that's the key idea of this exercise. Let's begin. 101. world 102. school 103. still 104. try 105. in 106. as 107. last 108. ask 109. need 110. too 111. feel 112. three 113. when 114. state 115. never 116. become 117. between 118. high 119. really 120. something 121. another 122. family 123. own 124. out 125. leave 126. put 127. old 128. while 129. mean 130. on 131. keep 132. student 133. why 134. let 135. great 136. same 137. big 138. group 139. begin 140. seem 141. country 142. help 143. talk 144. turn 145. problem 146. every 147. start 148. hand 149. might 150. show 151. part 152. about 153. against 154. place 155. over 156. such 157. again 158. few 159. most 160. week 161. company 162. where 163. system 164. each 165. program 166. hear 167. so 168. question 169. during 170. work 171. play 172. government 173. run 174. small 175. number 176. off 177. always 178. move 179. like 180. night 181. live 182. point 183. believe 184. hold 185. today 186. bring 187. happen 188. next 189. without 190. before 191. large 192. all 193. million 194. must 195. home 196. under 197. water 198. room 199. write 200. mother You're done! Congratulations! Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 40027 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / ŋ / (NG) as in "thing"- American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn how to pronounce consonant sound /ŋ/ used in words like "going," "long," or "bring." Improve your American accent with four phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Links: • How to recognize the / ŋ / in words : 01:00 • The consonant sound / ŋ / cheat sheet: 02: 25 • How to make the consonant sound / ŋ /: 02: 43 • Typical mistakes in pronunciation of the / ŋ /: 03:38 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 05:48 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 07:49 • Pronunciation exercise 3: 09:03 • Pronunciation exercise 4: 10:16 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #NasalSounds ► Consonant Sound /n / as in "nice": https://goo.gl/5rDFpN ► Thin or Thing? Sin or Sing? : https://goo.gl/CiYt41 ► Consonant sounds (playlist): https://goo.gl/fYE3xe [ThIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /ŋ/, as in the word "thing." You can also hear this sound in words like "sing," "long," "bank" or "uncle." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /ŋ/ - for this sound. Many non-native English speakers don't realize they have difficulty with the /ŋ/ sound. However, this sound is often distorted, which noticeably affects their American pronunciation. The good news is that once you know how the /ŋ/ sound is spelled and how to pronounce it correctly, you will sound more like an American. Let's start with learning how to recognize the /ŋ/ in written words. 1.The /ŋ/ is most commonly represented by the combination of letters '-ng' at the end of words. So, when you see a word that ends with the 'ng' combination, you should always pronounce the sound /ŋ/. For example: "going," "long," "king." As you may have already noticed, the final 'g' is not pronounced, as it belongs to the /ŋ/ sound. 2. Sometimes you may find the combination 'ng' in the middle of a word. For example: "English," "finger," "jungle." Now take a look: In these words the letter 'n' is still pronounced as /ŋ/, but you should also pronounce the letter 'g' as it's part of the next syllable. 3. And finally, there's one last case. Listen to these words: "think," "thank" or "zinc." The letter 'n' is pronounced as /ŋ/ as it occurs before the letter 'k' or the letter 'c.' If it still feels complicated, here's a quick summary: • If you see a word that ends with 'ng,' you have the /ŋ/ sound • If you see the letter 'n' before the letters 'g,' 'k' or 'c,' pronounce the 'n' as /ŋ/. And now, let's find out how to make the /ŋ/ sound. To make the /ŋ/ sound correctly, it's important to pass the air through your nose. Let's take a closer look at how to do that: Pull the back of your tongue toward your throat. Next: stop the air in your mouth with the back of your tongue and direct into your nose. If you make this sound correctly, you should be able to stretch out this sound, like this: /ŋ-ŋ-ŋ-ŋ-ŋ/ Now, let's try saying it: /ŋ/, /ŋ/, /ŋ/ Here are a few typical mistakes people make when pronouncing the /ŋ/ sound: 1. The most common mistake is when people pronounce the /ŋ/ as the /n/ and /g/ sounds. As a result, the /ŋ/ is distorted and sounds like /ng/. Remember, even though the /ŋ/ is represented by the two letters 'ng', it's still a single sound. The letter 'g' is never pronounced in the 'ng' combination at the end of words. Listen: "sing" /siŋ/ but not "sing" /sing/ or /siŋg/ 2. This is similar to the previous problem when the /ŋ/ is pronounced as two sounds. Some people don't pronounce the final 'g' when making the /ŋ/, and that's great, except for the fact that they pronounce the voiceless sound /k/ instead. As a result, the /ŋ/ sounds more like /nk/. This way the word "sing" will sound more like "sink." Which, by the way, is a totally different word. Compare: "sing" - "sink." 3. Finally, some people distort the /ŋ/ by placing the tip of the tongue to the alveolar ridge or against the back of their upper front teeth. As a result, the /ŋ/ sounds more like the /n/ sound. [Pronunciation exercise 1] • being • bring • doing • dying • going • king • lying • ring • sing • sling • sting • swing • thing • wing • wring [Pronunciation exercise 2] • along • among • bang • belong • gang • hang • hung • long • slang • song • strong • sung • swung • wrong • young [Pronunciation exercise 3] • bank • crank • donkey • drank • drink • drunk • ink • junk • length • monkey • pink • thank • think • uncle • zinc [Pronunciation exercise 4] • anger • angle • angry • bungle • congress • English • finger • hunger • hungry • jungle • language • mingle • shingle • single • triangle You're done!
Views: 57082 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / ʒ / as in "vision" – American English Pronunciation
 
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The / ʒ / sound is one of, if not the rarest sounds in American English. If you take 10,000 most common English words, only 74 words will have the / ʒ / sound. Trust us, we counted them all. So if you wonder if you can safely skip this sound, go ahead. But if you're not that kind of person, this video is for you. You'll find out how to pronounce the / ʒ / consonant correctly and practice making this sound with pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • A brief overview of fricative consonants: 0:47 • Fricative consonants definition: 01:38 • How to pronounce the / ʒ / sound: 02:47 • Typical mistakes: 04:11 • Pronunciation exercise: 06:20 • Spelling for the / ʒ / sound: 08:29 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #FricativeSounds ► Consonant Sound /f/ as in "fun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05f62-73nrY ► Consonant Sound /v/ as in "very" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5Oro6v0klg ► Consonant Sound /s/ as in "sun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hWPXaPXrnQ ► Consonant Sound /z/ as in "zoo" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky7Jh9Bbjts ► Consonant Sound /ʃ/ as in "show" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wINb4HFguck ► Consonant Sound /ʒ/ as in "vision" – this video ► Consonant Sound /θ/ as in "think" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qC0l6GQZtM4 ► Consonant Sound /ð/ as in "this" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZb_EWVCUoE ► Consonant Sound /h/ as in "home" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dV6At0g4n78 ► The Shocking Truth About Long And Short English Vowels https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQa9w__GqLc ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /ʒ/, as in the word "vision." You can also hear this sound in words like "measure," "usual," "beige" or "massage." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /ʒ/ - for this sound. As usual, let's begin with some phonology. Stay calm, it's not complicated :). The /ʒ/ belongs to a category of consonant sounds called the fricatives. This is the largest group of consonants in American English: it consists of nine different sounds! So, why are they called the fricative consonants? All these sounds are made by partially blocking the air moving through your mouth, which creates an audible friction. Speaking about the /ʒ/ consonant, - this sound is made by partially blocking the air flowing between the blade of your tongue and the roof of your mouth. The /ʒ/ sound is incredibly rare. It's present in less than 1% of English words. You know, it's okay if you think that this sound isn't worth the trouble learning it. But you'll have to avoid using words like "usual," "casual," "decision," and "television." It's your decision, of course, but we kind of like these words. So, let's find out how to make the /ʒ/ sound. Slightly open your mouth and round your lips. You may push them out a little. Now, focus on your tongue. Arch your tongue and raise it to the roof of your mouth, but don't touch it. Make sure there's a small gap between them. Next, release a stream of air over your tongue. When the air flows between the blade of your tongue and the roof of your mouth, it'll create lots of noise. Something like this: /ʒ/. The /ʒ/ is a voiced sound, so don't forget to add your voice. Remember, the fricatives are continuous sounds and this is also true for the /ʒ/ sound. So, let's try and stretch it out. Ready? /ʒ-ʒ-ʒ-ʒ-ʒ/ Awesome. Want to try it one more time? /ʒ-ʒ-ʒ-ʒ-ʒ/ Here are a few typical mistakes that people make when pronouncing this sound. Number 1. The most common mistake is that many non-native speakers devoice the /ʒ/ sound. Usually, people don't realize that they pronounce the voiceless /ʃ/ sound instead. Remember, this may work for other languages, but the American /ʒ/ should never be devoiced in words. By the way, don't forget to lengthen the vowel before the /ʒ/ sound! Remember our Vowel Length rule? The /ʒ/ is a voiced consonant, so the vowel sound before the /ʒ/ is typically longer than before its voiceless counterpart, the consonant sound /ʃ/. Number two. Another problem is that some people involuntarily stop the air before making the /ʒ/ sound. As a result, they end up pronouncing a different sound, the /dʒ/ consonant. While this is a nice sound, you shouldn't pronounce it instead of the /ʒ/. Why? Because this can lead to misunderstandings! [Pronunciation exercise] • beige • camouflage • closure • conclusion • division • garage • leisure • massage • measure • occasion • pleasure • precision • prestige • sabotage • television • treasure • usual • version • vision You're done! Congratulations!
Views: 21080 Sounds American
The Shocking Truth About Long And Short English Vowels – American English Pronunciation
 
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Everyone has heard about long and short vowels, and that the length of vowels is very important in English. But you know that already, right? What you probably don't know is that you may have learned it the wrong way. In this video, we're going to address common misunderstandings about the length of vowels and discuss essential rules to help you improve your pronunciation. • Do you know that there are no such things as the "long vowel 'A' and the short vowel 'A' in phonetics? • By the way, the vowel length symbol doesn't always mean that you need to pronounce a longer vowel. • All this doesn't mean that all American vowels have the same length. No, they don't. And there's a rule for this, but it's a secret ;). You have to watch this video to find out. Quick Links: • Vowel Length Symbol: 0:55 • Long 'A' – Short 'A' : 04:12 • Misconceptions Cleared Up, Summary: 05:29 • Vowel Length Rule: 06:04 • Tense and Relaxed Vowel Sounds: 07:46 • Pronunciation Exercise: 08:37 • Quiz: 11:30 Related Videos: ► Pronunciation of Vowel Sounds (Playlist) https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYJV5Moz9cfzjvOs8X4dOSrpMGHZL9mSo ►Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Online https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary ►Cambridge Dictionary https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/ ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to discuss common misunderstandings about the length of vowels and the essential rules for their pronunciation. Since you're watching this video, you've probably heard about long and short English vowels before, haven't you? Beware, after watching this video, your life will never be the same. Keep calm and embrace it. For those who haven't heard about them, don't worry, - your life won't be the same either. There's a lot of confusion and misconceptions about the length of English vowels. To be honest, it seems like a big mess. Let's clear things up. Number one. We'll start with something that you can find in many English dictionaries: the Vowel Length symbol. Take a look at this example. Here's the word "leaf" and it's transcription: /li:f/. Have you noticed this symbol? This symbol is used to denote a long vowel sound. In this case, it's the vowel sound /i:/. As opposed to the short vowel sound /ɪ/, as in the word "live." Take a look: Let's check and compare the actual lengths of these two vowels. Here are the recordings from the Longman online dictionary. Listen to these words very carefully. Which vowel sound do you think is longer? The one in the word on the left or the one in the word on the right? We know, it may be hard to tell. Let's try again... You know, we trust technology more than our ears. So, we measured the lengths. The measurements tell us that the so-called "long" /i:/ in "leaf" is approximately the same length as the /ɪ/ in "live." As it turns out, the "long" /i:/ isn't that long, right? [Pronunciation exercise] • half • have • leaf • leave • safe • save • surface • service • base • bathe • bat • bad • duck • dug • leak • league • peck • peg • cup • cub • rip • rib • bus • buzz • price • prize • race • raise • batch • badge
Views: 20621 Sounds American
Did or Dead? Big or Beg? American English Pronunciation
 
07:19
Learn the difference between the / ɪ / and / ɛ / vowel sounds. Practice pronunciation of the / ɪ / and / ɛ / with minimal pairs exercises, using words like "bit" and "bet," "hid" and "head," or "gym" and "gem." Improve your American accent with essential pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Can you hear the difference b/w/ the / ɪ / and / ɛ /? Quiz: 1:14 • Key distinctions b/w the / ɪ / and / ɛ /: 2:23 • Pronunciation exercise: 3:26 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #MinimalPairs ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ►Vowel Sound /ɪ/ as in "it" - American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/HJ3kDs ►Vowel Sound /ɛ/ as in "bed"- American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/m4WCwT [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we'll compare two vowel sounds: /ɪ/ and /ɛ/, as in the words "big" and "beg." In our previous videos we learned how to make them. Remember the videos for the /ɪ/ sound, as in the word "it" and the /ɛ/ sound, as in the word "bed"? This time we'll focus on the differences between these two sounds. Most non-native English speakers can distinguish the /ɪ/ and /ɛ/ as different sounds, but they often distort or confuse these vowels when pronouncing them. And that's what other people hear as an accent. In this video we'll help you fix this by practicing the /ɪ/ and the /ɛ/ and contrasting them in word pairs. Before we begin, let's check how well you can differentiate between the /ɪ/ and the /ɛ/ sounds. You'll see a pair of words on the screen and hear only one of them pronounced. For example, "b*g." Can you guess what word you heard? Let's try a few more word pairs. How did you do? Don't worry if you didn't get all the words right. You'll improve if you complete the pronunciation exercises which are coming up in just a minute. Here are the 2 key distinctions between the /ɪ/ and the /ɛ/: First, look at the position of the lower jaw: • For the /ɪ/ sound, the mouth is open very little./isn't very open • For the /ɛ/ sound, the mouth is half open. Second. Look at the tongue: • For the /ɪ/ sound, the tongue is raised high in the mouth. • For the /ɛ/ sound, the tongue is in the middle of the mouth. Let's pronounce these sounds one after the other: /ɪ/ - /ɛ/, /ɪ/ - /ɛ/, /ɪ/ - /ɛ/ [Pronunciation exercise] Now that you've revised how to make these sounds, let's start practicing. Don't skip this part, as the only way to improve your accent is to practice as much as possible. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. After that you'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, the first word will have the /ɪ/ vowel sound, and the second will have the /ɛ/ vowel sound. Let's begin! • bid – bed • big – beg • bill – bell • bit – bet • bitter – better • built – belt • dessert – desert • did – dead • disc – desk • fill – fell • gym – gem • hid – head • hill – hell • jill – gel • knit – net You're done! Congratulations! To check, how much you've improved, you can do the word pairs test again. Click this link to go back and compare the results. By the way, did you know that the letter 'e' can represent both the /ɛ/ and the /ɪ/ vowel sounds? For example, /ɛ/ as in "beg" and /ɪ/ as in "begin." The rule is simple, the /ɛ/ is found in the stressed syllables and the /ɪ/ is found in the unstressed ones. Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 24098 Sounds American
Taste or Test? Date or Debt? American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn the difference between the /eɪ/ and the /ɛ/ vowel sounds. Practice pronunciation of the /eɪ/ and the /ɛ/ with minimal pairs exercises using words like "fade" and "fed," "gate" and "get," or "jail" and "gel." Improve your American accent with essential pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. • Quiz: 01:05 • How to make the /eɪ/ and the /ɛ/ sounds: 02:20 • Pronunciation exercise: 03:26 • Confusing spelling of the /eɪ/ and the /ɛ/: 06:29 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #MinimalPairs ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: American English Pronunciation https://goo.gl/IwiOIn ► Vowel Sound /eɪ/ as in "make": https://goo.gl/qIUkmE ► Vowel Sound /ɛ/ as in "bed": https://goo.gl/nIijcW [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we'll compare two vowel sounds: /eɪ/ and /ɛ/, as in the words "taste" and "test." In our previous videos, we learned how to make them. Remember the videos for the /eɪ/ sound, as in the word "make" and the /ɛ/ sound, as in the word "bed"? This time we'll focus on the differences between these two sounds. The pronunciation of the /eɪ/ and the /ɛ/ vowels sounds can be problematic for non-native English speakers. Most people confuse these two sounds and distort them in speech. The most effective way to improve your pronunciation of these vowel sounds is to contrast them in word pairs. Before we begin, let's check how well you can differentiate between the /eɪ/ and the /ɛ/ sounds. You'll see a pair of words on the screen and hear only one of them pronounced. For example, "***."Can you guess what word you heard? Let's try a few more word pairs. [QUIZ] How did you do? Don't worry if you couldn't recognize some of the words. We've got some pronunciation exercises to help you improve! Here are the 2 key distinctions between the /eɪ/ and the /ɛ/ sounds: First, look at the lips. • For the /eɪ/ sound, the lips are stretched and tensed. • For the /ɛ/ sound, the lips are relaxed and more neutral. Second. Look at the tongue and the jaw: • For the /eɪ/ sound, the tongue is tensed and the mouth is slightly open. • For the /ɛ/ sound, the tongue is relaxed and the mouth is more open. Let's pronounce these sounds one after the other: /eɪ/ - /ɛ/, /eɪ/ - /ɛ/, /eɪ/ - /ɛ/ [Pronunciation Exercise] Now that you've revised how to make these sounds, let's start practicing. Don't skip this part, as the only way to improve your accent is to practice as much as possible. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. After that you'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, the first word will have the tense /eɪ/ vowel sound, and the second will have the relaxed /ɛ/ vowel sound. Let's begin! • age – age • date – debt • fade – fed • fail – fell • gate – get • hail – hell • jail – gel • lace – less • laid – led • late – let • main – men • pain – pen • rake – wreck • sail – sell • saint - sent You're done! Congratulations! To check how much you've improved, you can do the word pairs test again. Click this link to go back and compare the results. By the way, did you know that the /eɪ/ and the /ɛ/ vowel sounds can be represented by the same letters? For example, • the letter 'a' usually sounds like /eɪ/ , as in the word "mane"; but it may also sound like /ɛ/, as in the word "many." • The letter 'e' typically sounds like /ɛ/, as in the word "men," but it may sometimes sound like /eɪ/, as in the word "résumé." • What's also interesting is that the combination of the letters "ea" can represent these two sounds as well: the /eɪ/ vowel sound, as in the word "break," and the /ɛ/ vowel sound, as in the word "bread." • It's also true for the combination of the letters 'ai'. This combination most often sounds like /eɪ/ as the word 'main' and sometimes like /ɛ/, as in the word "said." Thanks for watching! Hope you find it useful. Stay tuned on our Sounds American channel!
Views: 24722 Sounds American
Diphthong Sound / aʊ / as in "cloud" – American English Pronunciation
 
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There are three diphthongs in American English. This time we're talking about the /aʊ/, as in the word "cloud." Enjoy! In this video, you'll find out how to make the /aʊ/ diphthong and how to avoid pronunciation mistakes. You'll practice this sound with a pronunciation exercise recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Diphthong vs. monophthong: 0:37 • Diphthong definition: 01:47 • How to make the /aʊ/: 02:20 • Typical pronunciation mistakes: 03:57 • Pronunciation exercise: 05:26 • Spelling for diphthong /aʊ/: 09:04 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #Diphthongs ► Vowel Sound /ɑ/ as in "got": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5CY1UniS68& ► Vowel Sound /ʊ/ as in "put": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moLTR-dLQQY ► Diphthong Sound /aɪ/ as in "like": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uD-GuuSgyk ► Diphthong Sound /ɔɪ/ as in "boy": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfjPBN22mK8 ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American vowel sound /aʊ/, as in the word "cloud." You can also hear this sound in words like "how," "now," "out," or "town." We'll be using special phonetic symbols — /aʊ/ — for this sound. Let's begin with a simple exercise. Take a look at these two words: "bra" and "brow" [/brɑ/] - [/braʊ/] They differ by their vowel sounds: the /ɑ/ in "bra" and the /aʊ/ in "brow." Now, watch and compare what happens when you pronounce these vowels: /ɑ/ - /aʊ/ Do you see a difference in how your tongue and jaw move? When you pronounce the /ɑ/ sound, your tongue and jaw move into one position only. So, you pronounce just one sound. That's why the /ɑ/ is called a "monophthong," which means "a single sound." However, when you pronounce the /aʊ/ vowel, your tongue and jaw move from one position to another. The /aʊ/ sound is called a "diphthong," which means that it's made by merging two single sounds into one. That's why your jaw and tongue change their positions as you make the first sound and then connect it to the second. There are three diphthongs in American English, the /aʊ/, the /ɔɪ/ and the /aɪ/, as in the words "bow," "boy," and "by." We'll cover the /ɔɪ/ and the /aɪ/ in our other videos. As for the /aʊ/, let's find out how to pronounce this sound. To make the /aʊ/ diphthong correctly, you need to pronounce two sounds and make a smooth connection between them. This is how you do that. Start with making the /ɑ/ sound. Open your mouth as wide as possible. Relax your lips and allow them to rest in a neutral position. Flatten your tongue and place it very low in your mouth. The tip of your tongue should be touching the back of your bottom front teeth. Next, connect the /ɑ/ to the /ʊ/ sound. Smoothly move your jaw up, until your mouth is almost closed. Then pull the back of your tongue to your throat. The first sound in a diphthong is typically longer and louder. So, make sure that you pronounce a nice and full /ɑ/ and then connect it to the /ʊ/. Now, let's glide from the /ɑ/ to the /ʊ/ and blend the two sounds together: /aʊ/, /aʊ/, /aʊ/. Let's talk about the most typical mistakes that people make when pronouncing the /aʊ/ diphthong. 1. Many non-native English speakers reduce the /ʊ/ sound in the /aʊ/. As a result, the whole sound gets distorted, and it may lead to misunderstandings. Compare: "shout" -- "shout" 2. In words like "town," or "down" the /aʊ/ is followed by a nasal consonant /n/. Some people may distort the /aʊ/ by pronouncing it through their nose. This happens if you pass the air through your nose too early, before making the /n/ sound. How do you fix this? Practice pronouncing such words this way: /taʊ/ - /n/ - "town," "daʊ" - /n/ - "down." Remember, both sounds in diphthongs are equally important. Don't reduce the second sound and avoid pronouncing your diphthongs through your nose! [Pronunciation exercise] Now, let's practice the /aʊ/ sound in some words. This is how the practice works. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Don't skip this part and do your best to practice as many words as possible. Let's begin. • about • allow • bow • cloud • couch • cow • crowd • doubt • eyebrow • flower • house • how • loud • mouse • mouth • now • powder • shout • south • thousand • towel • vowel • amount • bounce • brown • clown • count • down • downtown • drown • found • frown • gown • ground • noun • playground • pound • round • sound • town You're done! Congratulations!
Views: 31722 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / m / as in "map"- American English Pronunciation
 
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Learn how to pronounce consonant sound /m/ used in words like "mall," "same," or "warm." Improve your American accent with three phonetic exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Practice pronunciation of the / m / consonant sound in everyday words. Quick Links: • How to make the /m/ sound: 01:02 • Typical mistakes: 01:54 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 04:48 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 06:41 • Pronunciation exercise 3: 08:10 Related videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #NasalSounds ► Consonant Sound / n / as in "nice": https://goo.gl/x4LEUv ►Consonant Sound / ŋ / (NG) as in "thing": https://goo.gl/cln5KL [ THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /m/, as in the word "map." You can also hear this sound in words like "make," "room," "smile" or "email." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /m/ - for this sound. The /m/ sound exists in almost every language in the world, and that's good news if you're learning American pronunciation. But there's also some news that's not so good. There are many languages where this sound is pronounced differently. And it can be hard to catch these differences and improve your pronunciation. But don't worry - that's exactly what we'll be doing in this video. So let's see how Americans pronounce the /m/ sound. To make the /m/ sound correctly, focus on passing the air through your nose. Let's take a closer look at how to do that: First, press your lips together. Next, keep your lips closed to stop the air from escaping from your mouth and direct it into your nose. If you make this sound correctly, you should be able to stretch out this sound, like this: /m-m-m-m-m/ Now, let's try saying it: /m/, /m/, /m/ Here are a few typical mistakes people make when they pronounce the /m/ sound. 1. Some people pronounce the /m/ with their mouth open, especially when it's at the end of a word. If you make the /m/ this way, the air will pass through your mouth. This is okay in certain languages, but the American /m/ should be pronounced with your lips pressed together, to direct the air through your nose. Like this: /m/. 2. This problem is pretty common. Many foreign speakers don't pronounce the /m/ at the end of words. That's not how English works :). Remember, in English the 'm' is always pronounced, no matter where it's found in a word. If you drop it, you may end up saying a completely different word. Compare: "claim" - "clay," "game" - "gay." How do you fix this? Practice adding the /m/ at the end of words, like this: "clay" - /m/ - "claim," "gay" - /m/ - "game." 3. This is another common problem. It's best to explain it with an example. Take a look at the word “home." In this word the /m/ follows a vowel sound. In words like these some people may distort the vowel by pronouncing it through the nose. This happens if you pass the air through your nose too early, before making the /m/ sound. How do you fix this? Just like the previous problem. Practice pronouncing such words this way: "blue" - /m/ - "bloom," "see" - /m/ - "seem." Watch your vowels! 4. Finally, some people confuse the nasal sounds: the /m/, the /n/ and the /ŋ/. Guess what happens? Correct, it can change the meaning of the words. Compare: "ram" - "ran" - "rang." Three absolutely different words! We hope that these problems have nothing to do with your pronunciation. Still, just in case, we've prepared a few exercises. As we always do. :) [Pronunciation exercise 1] This is how it works. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Repeat each word after the speaker, and try to go through as many words as possible. Remember, this is the most important part of the whole lesson. Let's start with the /m/ at the beginning of words. • mall • mark • mask • math • meal • meet • miss • mix • mood • mop • more • move • much • mug • must Let's pause for a second. [Pronunciation exercise 2] The next 15 words have the /m/ sound following a vowel. Remember how to pronounce such words? Correct, focus on the /m/ and watch your vowels! Let's continue practicing. • aim • blame • claim • climb • comb • crime • dime • flame • frame • home • prime • rhyme • same • shame • time Good job so far! [Pronunciation exercise 3] The next words are tricky. Don't confuse the /m/ with the other nasal sounds or you'll get a different word! BTW, can you guess what word it would be? :) Let's get back to the practice. • beam • bum • came • dumb • foam • game • gum • ham • hum • lame • lime • scream • seam • skim • slam • some • swim • term • them • warm You're done! Congratulations!
Views: 23485 Sounds American
R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɑr / as in "car" – American English Pronunciation
 
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The /ɑr/ may not seem a tricky sound to learn. Once you know how to pronounce and merge the /ɑ/ and /r/ sounds, it's just a matter of practice. However, the /ɑr/ is often confused with other r-colored vowels as their spelling is often misleading. Compare: "scar" – "scare" or "far" – "fare." In this video, you'll find out how to make the /ɑr/ sound and how to avoid the most typical pronunciation mistakes. As usual, there's a pronunciation exercise recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Recap from the R-colored vowels overview: 00:36 • How to make the /ɑr/ sound: 01:20 • Typical pronunciation mistakes: 02:54 • Pronunciation exercise: 04:36 • Spelling for the /ɑr/ sound: 08:18 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #VowelSounds #RColoredVowels ► R-Colored Vowel Sounds Overview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJnrTGH3aXo ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɝ / as in "first": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ppOrwjvslc& ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɚ / as in "after": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzNRoSGBh44& ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɪr / as in "hero": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0bkG5ZfzH4 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɛr / as in "chair": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjurI7xtCjE ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɑr / as in "car": this video ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / ɔr / as in "sport": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbDrxmP4_S4 ► R-Colored Vowel Sound / aɪr / as in "fire": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdV7RymsiMY ► Consonant Sound / r / as in "run": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5a2-KuHkBU ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American R-colored vowel /ɑr/, as in the word "car." You can also hear this sound in words like "park," "art," "heart," or "far." We'll be using special phonetic symbols — /ɑr/ — for this sound. Let's recap what we've learned in the R-Colored Vowels Overview video: • The /ɑr/ is one of the seven American R-colored vowel sounds. • The /ɑr/ is an R-colored diphthong... • ...and it's made by merging the /ɑ/ and the /r/ sounds. • As with all R-colored vowel sounds, the /ɑr/ is often distorted by non-native English speakers. • The spelling for R-colored vowels could be confusing. Now, let's find out how to pronounce this R-colored vowel. To make the /ɑr/ sound correctly, focus on pronouncing two sounds and making a smooth connection between them. This is how you do that. Start with making the /ɑ/ sound. Open your mouth as wide as possible. Relax your lips and allow them to rest in a neutral position. Now, let's move your tongue in the correct position for the /ɑ/ vowel. Place your tongue very low in the center of your mouth and make it flat. The tip of your tongue should be touching the back of your bottom front teeth. Next, connect the /ɑ/ to the /r/ sound with a long gliding movement. Slightly round your lips. Curl back the tip of your tongue. Now, slightly lower the center of your tongue and raise its back. Your tongue should be tensed. Now, let's color the /ɑ/ with the /r/ and blend the two sounds together: /ɑr/, /ɑr/, /ɑr/. Let's talk about the most typical mistakes that people make when pronouncing the /ɑr/ sound. 1. Many non-native English speakers reduce the /r/ sound in the /ɑr/ vowel. This would be fine in British English, but an American accent requires the /r/ to be pronounced. So, if you reduce the /r/, your American /ɑr/ sound will be distorted, and it may lead to misunderstandings. Compare: "car" -- "car" "park' -- "park" 2. Some non-native speakers pronounce the /r/ in the /ɑr/, but they trill it. Remember, Americans never trill their R-colored vowel sounds. Compare: "car"-- "car" "park" -- "park" How do you avoid trilling? The tip of your tongue should never touch the alveolar ridge when you pronounce the R-colored sounds. Remember, if you want to sound like an American, don't reduce the /r/ when pronouncing the R-colored vowels and avoid trilling them. Now, let's practice the /ɑr/ sound in some words. [Pronunciation exercise] • alarm • apartment • are • army • art • article • bar • bark • barn • car • card • carpet • cart • charge • charm • dark • darling • department • farm • garbage • garden • guard • guitar • hard • hardware • harmony • heart • large • marble • parcel • pardon • park • part • partner • party • scar • star • start • tardy • yard
Views: 28705 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / g / as in "gift" – American English Pronunciation
 
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The /g/ sound is not as easy to pronounce as it seems. Yes, you probably know how to make it, but most likely you pronounce it with a strong foreign accent. In this video, you'll find out how to make the AMERICAN /g/ and different ways it can be pronounced. This will bring you closer to speaking with an American accent. You'll practice making this sound with several exercises recorded by the best speech therapist specializing in accent modification in the US. Quick Links: • Review of the /g/ consonant: 0:55 • Rules for letter 'G': 02:20 • How to make the /g/ sound: 03: 37 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 04:28 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 06:40 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #StopSounds ►Stop Sounds Overview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFPbLcUCraQ ► Consonant Sound / p / as in "pie" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_n_rUKQSew& ► Consonant Sound /b/ as in "boy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbCOXRz7Uf8 ► Consonant Sound /t/ as in "toy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLlotV_0dRI& ► Consonant Sound Flap 'T' /t̬/ as in "water" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9b-UIkuwOdU ► Consonant Sound Glottal 'T' /ʔ/ as in "button" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vabg-EUHOQk ► Consonant Sound /d/ as in "dog" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N73xPe0x79g ► Consonant Sound /k/ as in "key" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxrveu6yu6E& ► Consonant Sound /g/ as in "gift" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP5XKYvxe0Q [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /g/, as in the word "gift" You can also hear this sound in words like "good," "dog," "forget" or "egg." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /g/ - for this sound. The /g/ is one of six stop consonants in the stop sounds category. We're pretty sure that everyone can pronounce a /g/ sound. The problem is that the majority of the non-native English speakers pronounce the American /g/ with a strong foreign accent. Let's find out how to fix that. We'll start with reviewing what we learned in the Stop Sounds Overview video. The /g/ is made by stopping the air with the back of your tongue in your throat. The /g/ is a voiced sound. It has a voiceless counterpart, the consonant sound /k/. As with all stop consonants, it's important to know when you should or shouldn't aspirate the /g/ sound. The /g/ is pronounced with a small puff of air at the beginning of words and syllables. Note, however, that at the end of words, the /g/ follows the final stop rule and is not aspirated. If you aspirate the final /g/ sound, you'll still be understood, but you won't be speaking with an American accent. Here are several examples: • "game," "goal," "begin" • "dog," "flag," "egg" These pronunciation rules are important, but with the /g/ sound it's sometimes more important not to confuse it with the /dʒ/ sound. Unfortunately, this may happen to the best of us :). Why? Because these two sounds are both represented by the same letter 'G.' The good news is that in written words the /g/ sound is always represented by the letter 'G'. The news that's not so good is that the letter 'G' doesn't always represent the sound /g/. Confused? Don't worry, just have a look. Always check the letter after the 'G'. That's how you'll know which sound to pronounce. If the 'G' is followed by the letters 'a', 'o' or 'u', pronounce the /g/ sound. For example, "game," "got," "guy" If the 'G' is followed by the letters 'i', 'e' or 'y', pronounce the /dʒ/ sound. For example, "age," "giant" or "gym." What if the 'G' is followed by a consonant letter? Well, then it's typically pronounced as /g/. We say "typically," as there are some other options, but we'll talk about them in our future videos. Now let's go back to the /g/ sound and find out how to make it. Slightly open your mouth and leave your lips in a neutral position. Next you have to stop the air in your mouth. This is how you do that: Raise the back of your tongue toward your throat. Stop the air with the back of your tongue and then release it with a small puff. The /g/ is a voiced sound, so don't forget to add your voice: /g/. Now, let's try saying it: /g/, /g/, /g/. [Pronunciation exercise 1] Let's start with the /g/ sound at the beginning of words. Remember, the /g/ is aspirated in this position. Let's begin! • game • garden • girl • glad • glamour • gold • gone • good • got • government • governor • gown • graceful • gradually • graffiti • grandchild • grant • green • guest • guy [Pronunciation exercise 2] • bag • big • blog • dig • dog • egg • flag • frog • hotdog • hug • league • leg • log • mug • pig • plug • rag • rug • vogue • wag
Views: 23887 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / ʃ / as in "show" – American English Pronunciation
 
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Pronunciation of the / ʃ / fricative is difficult for many non-native English speakers. First, the spelling is quite tricky and may be confusing. Second, even if you crack the spelling, you may still involuntarily mispronounce this sound. Watch this video to find out how to pronounce the / ʃ / consonant correctly and avoid the common pronunciation mistakes. You'll practice making this sound with pronunciation exercises recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • A brief overview of fricative consonants: 0:50 • Fricative consonants definition: 01:40 • How to pronounce the /ʃ/ sound: 02:35 • Typical mistakes: 03:40 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 05:56 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 07:38 • Pronunciation exercise 3: 09:07 • Spelling for the / ʃ / sound: 10:45 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #FricativeSounds ► Consonant Sound /f/ as in "fun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05f62-73nrY ► Consonant Sound /v/ as in "very" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5Oro6v0klg ► Consonant Sound /s/ as in "sun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hWPXaPXrnQ ► Consonant Sound /z/ as in "zoo" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky7Jh9Bbjts ► Consonant Sound /ʃ/ as in "show" - this video ► Consonant Sound /ʒ/ as in "vision" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8ImSmVOSVA ► Consonant Sound /θ/ as in "think" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qC0l6GQZtM4 ► Consonant Sound /ð/ as in "this" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZb_EWVCUoE ► Consonant Sound /h/ as in "home" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dV6At0g4n78 ► The Shocking Truth About Long And Short English Vowels https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQa9w__GqLc ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, JAPANESE, CHINESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /ʃ/, as in the word "show." You can also hear this sound in words like "ship," "cash," "option" or "chef." We'll be using this cute phonetic symbol - /ʃ/ - for this sound. As always, let's begin with some phonology. Take it easy, it's not complicated :). The /ʃ/ belongs to a category of consonant sounds called the fricatives. This is the largest group of consonants in American English: it consists of nine different sounds! Take a look: So, why are they called the fricative consonants? All these sounds are made by partially blocking the air, moving through your mouth, which creates an audible friction. Speaking about the /ʃ/ consonant, - this sound is made by partially blocking the air, flowing between the blade of your tongue and the roof of your mouth. Slightly open your mouth and round your lips. You may push them out a little. Now, focus on your tongue. Arch your tongue and raise it to the roof of your mouth, but don't touch it. Make sure there's a small gap between them. Next, release a stream of air over your tongue. When the air flows between the blade of your tongue and the roof of your mouth, it'll create lots of noise. Something like this: /ʃ/. Remember, the fricatives are continuous sounds and so is the /ʃ/ consonant. Let's try and stretch it out. Ready? /ʃ-ʃ-ʃ-ʃ-ʃ/ Excellent. How about one more time? /ʃ-ʃ-ʃ-ʃ-ʃ/ Here are a few typical mistakes that people make when pronouncing this sound. 1. Some Spanish speakers confuse the /ʃ/ and the /tʃ/ sounds. As you may have already guessed, it leads to misunderstandings. Make sure that you don't stop the air before making the /ʃ/ sound because that's exactly how the /tʃ/ sound is made. 2. Another problem is that some non-native English speakers replace the /ʃ/ with the /s/ consonant, especially when it occurs at the beginning of words. The /ʃ/ gets distorted when you move the tip of your of your tongue too close to your alveolar ridge. 3. And finally, always keep in mind the Vowel Length rule! The /ʃ/ is a voiceless consonant, so vowel sounds before the /ʃ/ are typically shorter than they are before voiced consonants. [Pronunciation exercise 1] • blush • bush • dish • finish • fish • leash • publish • push • shake • share • shine • short • shut • shy • wash [Pronunciation exercise 2] • associate • chef • Chicago • commercial • especially • financial • gracious • grocery • machine • ocean • official • social • special • species • sufficient [Pronunciation exercise 3] • action • completion • condition • construction • corporation • definition • dictionary • election • emotion • fiction • function • intuition • location • patient • tradition
Views: 15609 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / z / as in "zoo" – American English Pronunciation
 
12:25
Can you guess the most common spelling for the /z/ sound in American English? Correct, it's the letter 's', as in the word "as." Confusing spelling is one of the many reasons why people often mispronounce words with the /z/sound. Watch this video to find out more about typical mistakes that people make when making this sound. As usual, all the pronunciation instructions and exercises are recorded by a professional speech therapist. Quick Links: • Brief overview of fricative consonants: 0:47 • Fricative consonants definition: 01:37 • How to pronounce the /z/ sound: 03:20 • Typical mistakes: 04:26 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 07:24 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 09:30 • Spelling for the /z/ sound: 11:24 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #FricativeSounds ► Consonant Sound /f/ as in "fun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05f62-73nrY ► Consonant Sound /v/ as in "very" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5Oro6v0klg ► Consonant Sound /s/ as in "sun" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hWPXaPXrnQ ► Consonant Sound /z/ as in "zoo" - this video ► Consonant Sound /ʃ/ as in "show" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wINb4HFguck ► Consonant Sound /ʒ/ as in "vision" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8ImSmVOSVA ► Consonant Sound /θ/ as in "think" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qC0l6GQZtM4 ► Consonant Sound /ð/ as in "this" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZb_EWVCUoE ► Consonant Sound /h/ as in "home" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dV6At0g4n78 ► The Shocking Truth About Long And Short English Vowels - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQa9w__GqLc ► Interactive Vowel Sounds Chart - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EdRAfOMfnU& ► Stop Sounds Overview - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFPbLcUCraQ [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, VIETNAMESE, JAPANESE, AND CHINESE SUBTITLES] --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /z/, as in the word "zoo." You can also hear this sound in words like "zebra," "rose," "music" or "exam." We’ll be using a special phonetic symbol - /z/ - for this sound. As always, let's begin with some phonology. Fear not, it's all pretty simple. The /z/ belongs to a category of consonant sounds called the fricatives. This is the largest group of consonants in American English: it consists of nine different sounds! All these sounds are made by partially blocking the air moving through your mouth which creates an audible friction. Speaking about the /z/ consonant, this sound is made by partially blocking the air flowing between the tip of your tongue and your alveolar ridge. Let's begin and find out how Americans pronounce the /z/ sound. Slightly open your mouth. Now, focus on the position of the tip of your tongue. Raise the tip of your tongue to your alveolar ridge, but don't touch it. Make sure there's a small gap between them. Now, release a stream of air over the tip of your tongue. When the air flows between the tip of your tongue and the alveolar ridge towards your upper teeth, it creates a lot of noise. Something like this: /z/. The /z/ is a voiced consonant, so don't forget to add your voice. Same as all the other fricatives, the /z/ is a continuous sound, so you should be able to stretch it out, like this. Let's do it together. Here are a few typical mistakes that people make when pronouncing this sound. 1. The most common mistake is that non-native speakers devoice the /z/ sound when it occurs at the end of words. Many people are not aware that they should pronounce the voiced /z/ sound. Others simply don't realize that they pronounce the voiceless /s/ sound. Remember, the American /z/ is never devoiced at the end of words! Compare: By the way, don't forget to lengthen the vowel before the /z/ sound! The /z/ is a voiced consonant, so the vowel sound before the /z/ is typically longer than before its voiceless counterpart, the consonant sound /s/. Compare: This is called the Vowel Length rule and we talked about it in detail in one of our videos. As usual, you can find the link in the Description box below. 2. Another typical problem is that the /z/ is distorted or dropped at the end of words. In some languages, words don't end with fricative sounds, but if you drop them in English, you'll be misunderstood. 3. Some people pronounce the /z/ sound by putting the tip of the tongue between the teeth. As a result, they make a different fricative consonant, the /ð/ sound. And this may lead to misunderstandings. [Pronunciation exercise 1] • blaze • breeze • buzz • cozy • crazy • doze • freeze • jazz • lazy • prize • realize • size • sneeze • squeeze • zebra • zero • zinc • zip • zone • zoom [Pronunciation exercise 2] • busy • cousin • daisy • deserve • design • desire • easy • music • newspaper • observe • pleasant • poison • presence • raisin • reason • resort • season • Thursday • Tuesday • visit
Views: 17707 Sounds American
Consonant Sound / b / as in "boy" – American English Pronunciation
 
08:49
We know that you know how to pronounce the /b/ sound. What you probably don't know is that the /b/ in American English is most likely different from the /b/ in your mother tongue. After watching this video, you'll be one little step closer to speaking English with a true American accent. As usual, all pronunciation exercises are recorded by a speech-language pathologist specializing in American English pronunciation. Quick Links: • Review of the /b/ consonant: 0:36 • How to make the /b/ sound: 01:45 • Pronunciation exercise 1: 02:35 • Pronunciation exercise 2: 04:47 • Pronunciation exercise 3: 06:35 Related Videos: #AmericanPronunciation #ConsonantSounds #StopSounds ►Stop Sounds Overview – American English Pronunciation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFPbLcUCraQ ► Consonant Sound / p / as in "pie" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_n_rUKQSew& ► Consonant Sound /t/ as in "toy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLlotV_0dRI& ► Consonant Sound Flap 'T' /t̬/ as in "water" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9b-UIkuwOdU ► Consonant Sound Glottal 'T' /ʔ/ as in "button" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vabg-EUHOQk ► Consonant Sound /d/ as in "dog" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N73xPe0x79g ► Consonant Sound /k/ as in "key" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxrveu6yu6E& ► Consonant Sound /g/ as in "gift" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP5XKYvxe0Q [THIS VIDEO HAS ENGLISH, SPANISH, CHINESE, JAPANESE, AND VIETNAMESE SUBTITLES] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TRANSCRIPT Hello there! This is the "Sounds American" channel. In this video, we're going to talk about the American consonant sound /b/, as in the word "boy." You can also hear this sound in words like "bill," "cab," "baby" or "hobby." We'll be using a special phonetic symbol - /b/ - for this sound. The /b/ is one of six consonants in the stop sounds category. Let's start with reviewing the key points about the /b/ from the Stop Sounds Overview video. The /b/ is made by stopping the air with your lips. The /b/ is a voiced sound. It has a voiceless counterpart, the consonant sound /p/. As with all stops, aspiration is essential for the pronunciation of the /b/ sound. The /b/ is made with a slight puff of air at the beginning of words and stressed syllables. At the end of words, the /b/ follows the final stop rule and is not aspirated. For example, • "big," "black," "bird" •"job," "pub," "cab" Now let's find out how to pronounce the /b/ sound. To make the /b/ sound correctly, it's important to focus on stopping the air with your lips. Let's take a closer look at how to do that: Press your lips together to first stop the air in your mouth. Next, part your lips and release the air with a puff. Remember, the /b/ is a voiced sound, so you need to add your voice. Let's try making it: /b/, /b/, /b/. [Pronunciation Exercise 1] Let's get started with our practice with the /b/ sound at the beginning of words. Remember to add your voice and make a small puff of air when pronouncing the /b/ sound. This is how the practice works. You'll see a word on the screen and hear its pronunciation. Like this. You'll have a few seconds to pronounce the word. Try to practice as many words as possible, this is the most important part of the whole lesson. Let's begin! • bacon • bagel • bake • bakery • banana • barrel • bat • beef • berry • beverage • biscuit • blade • boil • bone • bottle • bread • breakfast • broil • burn • butter [Pronunciation Exercise 2] Great job! The words in the next group will have the /b/ sound at the end. Remember, you shouldn't make a puff of air when the /b/ is in this position. Let's continue practicing. • cab • club • crab • describe • disturb • doorknob • globe • grab • job • pub • rib • rob • robe • rub • scrub • sob • tub • tube • verb • web [Pronunciation Exercise 3] Excellent! Now, let's practice pronouncing words with more than one /b/ sound. Here's an additional challenge: you need to determine, which one is aspirated and which one is not. Let's begin! • absorb (both /b/ sounds are not aspirated) • babe (the first /b/ is aspirated, the second is not) • baby (both /b/ sounds are aspirated) • barber (both /b/ sounds are aspirated) • basketball (both /b/ sounds are aspirated) • bathtub (the first /b/ is aspirated, the second is not) • believable (both /b/ sounds are aspirated) • bible (both /b/ sounds are aspirated) • billboard (both /b/ sounds are aspirated) • blackboard (both /b/ sounds are aspirated) • Bob (the first /b/ is aspirated, the second /b/ is not aspirated) • bubble (the first /b/ is aspirated, the second /b/ is not aspirated) • bulb (the first /b/ is aspirated, the second /b/ is not aspirated) • probable (the first /b/ is not aspirated, the second /b/ is aspirated) • subscribe (both /b/ sounds are not aspirated)
Views: 18053 Sounds American