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How to build a closed Terrarium
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This How To guide is all about making closed Terrariums. I was inspired to create this terrarium by youtuber SerpaDesign, who creates great tutorials and terrarium videos along with helpful tips on building terrariums and a variety of other topics. Watch him here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGzXtNdhjPxvCNWFme1bG0g A terrarium is an enclosed ecosystem which can be entirely self-sustaining. Once set up and watered, you will never need to open it again since it will regulate its own water and nutrient cycles. Before we begin, you will need an airtight container. Some good examples include glass jars with clip tops, screw on lids or corks but for my example I’ll be using a large round display jar with a lid which sits comfortably on top, allowing it to retain the moisture in the air. Other equipment you will need includes porous mesh which allows water through but not substrate, some rocks or gravel, some activated carbon for fish tank filters or charcoal, and a selection of small to medium sized local plants and mosses. The first step is to place about an inch of stones or gravel in the base of your container. For this example, I’ll be using these coloured rocks since they are all I have readily available but any aquarium gravel or pebbles should do. Next, sprinkle on a coating of activated carbon sticks or charcoal to help with filtration. The next step is to cut out the shape of the base of your container from the porous mesh. It needs to cover the gravel layer entirely so it’s best to cut it slightly larger than the shape itself. Once this is in place over the gravel, you can add the soil. The purpose of this gravel layer is to separate the standing water from the soil to avoid roots rotting. The water will collect here as a water reservoir then will evaporate, condensate on the walls of your glass container and then fall back down into the substrate, effectively replicating the natural water cycle. This will ensure that the terrarium will naturally water itself. Moving onto the soil, a good soil mix should retain moisture well and be a mix of dead leaves, moss and compost. The soil layer should be deeper than your gravel layer to allow root space. Next, let’s add some plants to the terrarium. I will be making this a native terrarium so will be using plants from nearby parks and gardens. You could use tropical plants for yours instead. Place your choice of plants in the terrarium, paying close attention to your arrangement and how you would like it to look aesthetically. Think about putting larger plants in the background and smaller ones in the foreground. Moss is excellent for ground covering as it will eventually spread and make your terrarium look lush and wild. I’ve used a few different varieties of temperate moss inline and positioned them in-between the main plants. When choosing plants, pick some with a variety of leaf types and shades of green. Also, if you come across any worms or woodlice, set them aside for later as worms will help add nutrients to the soil and woodlice will decompose any dead matter which will help to break down nutrients. These nutrients will be absorbed by the plants through their roots via osmosis. You can also add pieces of bark or wood for landscaping. The final step is to water your terrarium by misting. Spray a very generous amount of water over the plants and moss to help them settle and to provide the ecosystem with water which will be continuously cycled throughout the terrarium. And there we have it, the perfect addition to your windowsill. You now have your very own tiny ecosystem in a jar. Observe how the plant life changes and spreads over time.You may notice that some die but this is normal. Other plants will grow in its place and seeds will spread. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 36179 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Sea Turtle
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Sea Turtles in the series Reptiles and Amphibians. - Brief Overview: Turtles are among the oldest groups of reptilians, having evolved millions of years ago. They can be found all over the world and inhabit almost every type of climate. There are seven different species of sea turtle, all of which vary in size and shape. The largest marine turtle is the leatherback. It can grow up to 7 feet (2 meters) long and weighs up to 2,000 lbs. (900 kilograms). The average lifespans of sea turtles can vary from 30 to 100 years, depending on the species. - Appearance: The appearance of marine turtles varies between species. The green sea turtle has a wide, smooth carapace which is brown or olive in colour, depending on its habitat. It is named after the greenish colour of its skin. The leatherback turtle has a rubbery, black shell while all other sea turtles have hard, bony shells. Ridges along its carapace help give it a more streamlined and hydrodynamic structure. Depending on the species, sea turtles colouring can range from olive-green, yellow, greenish-brown, reddish-brown, or black. All species of marine turtles have four flippers to help them swim, unlike tortoises or land turtles which have thick stubby legs for moving on land. - Diet: Sea turtles are omnivores, which means they eat both meat and vegetation, although their diet varies between species. Their diet consists of shrimp, seaweed, crabs, jellyfish, sponges, algae and mollusks. - Habitat: Sea turtles can be found in all the worlds oceans. The Kemp's Ridley turtle usually can be found in the Gulf of Mexico. The Flatback turtle inhabits the ocean around Australia, while the leatherback swims in every ocean on the planet. Green sea turtles and loggerhead turtles tend to stick to tropical and subtropical coastal waters. - Breeding: In the mating season, females and males migrate to the same beach where they were born, using the magnetic fields of the Earth as their guide. The migrations can be over 1,400 miles (2,253 kilometers) long. Sea turtles lay their eggs in clutches of 70 to 190 eggs. Females lay their clutches in holes they have dug in the beach. Once they have laid the eggs, they cover them in sand and return to the sea. Once the eggs hatch, the babies will dig their way out of their hole. Once free, the juveniles hurry to the safety of the sea to avoid being cooked by the sun or eaten by predators. - Status: The Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle is listed as critically endangered on the IUCN red list of threatened species, but the leatherback is listed as vulnerable. Some of the biggest threats to sea turtles include; oil spills, habitat loss (due to coastal development), accidental catching and poaching. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 57605 Natural World Facts
British Wildlife - Newts
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about British Newts in the series Reptiles and Amphibians. All footage taken by Leo R. There are three native newt species in the UK; smooth, palmate and great crested newts. Smooth newts are the most widespread species, common throughout the UK. They are most active around dusk and dawn, feeding on a wide variety of aquatic invertebrates. Newts are much faster in the water, with paddle-like tails to help them move quickly. As you can see here, they move their tails side to side like fish to propel themselves. Adult newts emerge from their overwintering sites in early spring and return to ponds to breed. Their breeding season is around April and May, at which time the male develops his crest which is absent throughout the rest of the year. In all species, the male puts on a courtship display in which he waves his crest and shows off his colours before the female. In smooth newts, the male’s colours become much more vivid in Spring while the female remains paler. Females lay small eggs surrounded by a transparent jelly capsule on leaves of aquatic plants or folded inside leaves. Two to four weeks later, larvae will hatch out. The larvae have feathery gills around the head, distinguishing them from frog and toad tadpoles. They will soon begin to develop their front then back legs before leaving the water as efts in Summer. At this time of year, adult newts will remain in the water hunting frog tadpoles. Their preferred habitats are weedy ponds in Spring, which provide cover and egg-laying locations on aquatic plants. However, later in the summer and in autumn, newts can be found sheltering on land under wood and rocks hunting slugs and insects. They spend the winter sheltering under rocks, in compost heaps or buried down in mud. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 17217 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Humpback Whale
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Humpback Whale in the series Mammals. - Brief Overview: The Humpback Whale is one of the larger species of whale, with males measuring over 15 meters (50 feet) long, which is still only half the size of the blue whale. They can weigh up to 44 tons (40,000kg). They are powerful swimmers, and use their massive tail fins, called flukes, to propel themselves through the water. They also use these powerful tails to breach completely out of the water before landing with a tremendous splash. Scientists aren't sure if this breaching behaviour has a purpose, such as cleaning pests from the whale's skin, or whether it is simply for fun. The average lifespan is around 50 years. - Appearance: Humpback Whales are grey-black in colour, with a white, patchy underside. When swimming, these whales arch their backs, making them look like a large hump, giving them their name ‘Humpbacks.’ They have unusually long pectoral fins, which are about 1/3 the length of its body, which it uses for swimming and propelling itself through the water. - Diet: Humpbacks prey on a diet of small fish, krill, salmon and herring along with other small prey. They are baleen whales, so have large plates of baleen instead of teeth. During the feeding season, they hunt using a technique known as bubble net fishing, in which a group of Humpbacks circle their prey and blow bubbles around them in order to herd the fish into a tight ball. The whales also create loud vocal sounds to scare the fish to the surface of the water and slap their fins against the water to stun the fish. The whales will swim up and lunge at the fish with an open mouth and engulf thousands in a single gulp. After capturing a mouthful of fish the humpback will then push the water out of its mouth using its tongue and swallow the prey. - Habitat: During the summer months, which is their feeding season, these whales can be found in cold waters in Alaska and Antarctica where there are large quantities of fish and krill. During winter, these whales migrate to locations such as Hawaii and the gulf of Maine to mate. During their migration, these whales are known to travel as far as 16,000 miles (25,000 km) making them one of the furthest migrating species in the world. - Breeding: Humpbacks mate during the winter months, and females have a gestation period of around 12 months. Once born, the calves are looked after by their mother for the first year and, like all other mammals, suckle milk. The milk is 35% fat and contains essential nutrients for the calf. - Status: Today there are at least 80,000 humpback whales worldwide, however at one point these marine mammals were considered highly endangered due to commercial whaling. They have since made a huge comeback and are no longer at risk, however still face threats such as noise pollution and overfishing of their prey items. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 15790 Natural World Facts
British Wildlife - Slow Worms
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Slow Worms in the series Reptiles and Amphibians. All footage taken by Leo R. Whilst on location in Cumbria, I encounter one of Britains strangest reptiles. The Slow Worm. In this video, I give you facts, footage and more about this intriguing animal. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 45801 Natural World Facts
5 Weird Animal Behaviours #1 - The zombie sea star and more
 
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Hello and welcome to Natural World Facts, in this episode of wierd animal facts Leo will be talking about the plant that eats bats, the strange pyrosome 'sea sock,' the great red crab migration and the zombie starfish who are losing their limbs. - Number 5: The plant that ‘eats’ bats A scientific expedition to Borneo in 2014 was shocked when they captured these images of bats, seemingly being eaten by the carnivorous pitcher plant, which usually consumes insects that are attracted to its sweet, nectar fluid. Upon closer inspection, however, it seems these plants provide a perfect, cool place for bats to rest during the heat of the day. In return, the plant gets sustenance through the poo that the bats leave behind. Its a perfect symbiotic relationship and not, as it seemed at first, the first bat-eating plant. - Number 4: Ocean sock? This strange, luminescent tube had scientists stumped for ages. It lacked an organisms usual characteristics of eyes or a mouth and looked simply like a giant floating sock. However it was recently discovered that this was in fact living, but wasn’t just one organism. This was a pyrosome, a mass of thousands of tiny animals called zooids, stuck together like glue and trapping and eating plankton. Number 3: Red crab swarm For thousands of year, there has been a mass annual migration of tens of millions of red crabs on Christmas island from the forests down to the shore to mate and for the females to lay their eggs in the sea. But on recent migrations, thousands of these crabs had been dying for unknown causes. It was soon discovered that the culprit was an invasive species to the island, known as the yellow crazy ant. They immobilised the crabs by spraying formic acid in their eyes eyes and leg joints, soon killing the crabs which would become food for the ants. With the population of these ants increasing and the crabs decreasing, this could spell doom for Christmas islands iconic annual event. - Number 2: Pilot whales mass beaching In February 2017, hundreds of whales died after beaching themselves at a remote beach in New Zealand; over 650 pilot whales have beached themselves on a 3 mile stretch of Farewell Spit on the country's South Island. Over 330 of them died, 220 remain beached and 100 have made it back to sea. But why are these creatures suddenly beaching themselves, and all at the same time. Pilot whales travel in pods following a matriarch out to sea. If the group navigator is dead or injured it could explain why the group is repeatedly getting lost and stuck in shallow water. There is also evidence that naval ships sonar’s could be driving them into these waters. But the real reason remains unknown, however at least some science will also come out of the tragedy that may help researchers understand and prevent future mass strandings. - Number 1: The ‘zombie’ sea stars A very disturbing new behaviour was witnessed in sea stars on Americas west coast. They were observed pulling off their own arms, which then appear to crawl away from the body on their own. This behaviour was observed all along the pacific coast, from Alaska to Mexico, with over 20 different species of sea stars tearing themselves apart. But what had taken over these zombie starfish? Well, on every single species, each of their limbs is identical, and contains their vital organs. They feed by wrapping their stomach around their prey to dissolve it. Much like lizards tails, sea stars can regrow their limbs if it is torn off by a predator. Some species can regrow their entire body from a single arm, so long as a small part of the central disc remains. But this still doesn't explain why sea stars are simply losing their limbs with no sign of danger nearby. In some species, this is a way of reproducing; by splitting in two and creating a new sea star. But in this case, the are disintegrating and dying, littering the Pacific coast with bodies. Well, in 2014, scientists announced that they had in fact found what was causing this devastation. It was a newly-discovered diseases called sea star associated densovirus. Unfortunately, it remains unknown why it has suddenly caused all this destruction now when it has actually existed since the 1940’s. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 7995 Natural World Facts
My Black Beauty Stick Insects
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This video is all about my brand new pet Black Beauty Stick Insects. The Black Beauty Stick Insect (Peruphasma Schultei) is native only to Peru, and is very common in captivity. They are velvety - black in colour with bright yellow eyes and red wings which are displayed when the stick insect feels threatened. Black Beautys will also spray an irritant chemical from behind the eyes to deter predators. Thank you SO MUCH to Miss Mott, my form tutor, for giving me these amazing insects!!!!! They've laid 3 EGGS ALREADY :) Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 7298 Natural World Facts
Nature's Wonders - The Great Sardine Run
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Great Sardine Run in the new series Nature's Wonders. Each year, an incredible natural phenomenon occurs on the coasts of Southern Africa. The greatest fish migration on the planet. From May through July, billions of sardines spawn in the cool waters of the Agulhas Bank and move northwards along the East coast of Southern Africa to the warmer sub-tropical waters of the north-eastern cape, in shoals up to 7 km long. The sardine run is the largest biomass migration in the world, and is even larger than the iconic wildebeest migration. Each year, many predators will congregate for this one event, to feed on the migrating sardines. But not only sharks have shown up, a pod of common dolphins has also arrived for the feast. As the dolphins herd the fish, the threatened sardines group closely together to form a bait ball, minimising their chances of being picked out by predators. These bait balls can be 10-20 metres in diameter, however rarely last longer than ten minutes in this frenzy. Dolphins plough through the bait balls, scattering the fish to be picked out by the sharks. A Brydes Whale joins the feast, engulfing 10,000 sardines in one giant mouthful. Cape Gannets dive bomb the swarming prey, but the sardines resist these attack by staying deep and keeping the school together. However with predators attacking from below and above, the swarms break down into smaller targets and are driven up from the deep into shallower waters, becoming in range of the Gannets. The Gannets then descend upon the fish, plunge diving from considerable heights in order to catch their prey. A Gannet can travel as far as 100 km over the ocean in search of food, and will each year follow this mass migration of sardines along the coastline until almost every last one is eaten. I do not own the footage or music in this video. All credit goes to real owners. No copyright infringement intended. Music: A legacy uncovered - Icon Footage: BBC Earth/PBS Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 15686 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Ostrich
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Ostrich in the series Birds. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: Ostriches are the worlds largest species of bird. They are flightless, and are closely related to the Emu and the Cassowary. The Ostrich is the only species of bird with two toes on each foot, all other species of bird have 3 or 4 toes. They can run up to speeds of 65 km an hour (40 mph). The average lifespan of an Ostrich is 50-75 years. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 7514 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Killer Whale (Orca)
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Killer Whale in the series Mammals. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: The Killer Whale is the largest member of the dolphin family, they prey on a diet of fish, seals and even large marine mammals such as whales! When hunting, they sometimes beach themselves on land in order to catch prey. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 80059 Natural World Facts
BlackBirds Fact File - Birds
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Whale Shark in the series Ocean Life. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. CHAPTERS IN THIS VIDEO: Blackbird Brief Overview - 0:15 Blackbird Appearance - 0:31 Blackbird Diet - 0:51 Blackbird Birdsong - 1:02 Blackbird Nesting - 1:10 Blackbird Eggs - 1:31 Blackbird Migration 2:10 Blackbird Anatomy 2:20 Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 3466 Natural World Facts
British Wildlife - Grey Squirrel
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Grey Squirrel in the series Mammals. All footage taken by Leo R. During a visit to London's Holland Park, I encountered Britain's cutest mammal, the Grey Squirrel. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 4033 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Marine Iguana
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Penguins in the series Birds. - Brief Overview: The Galapagos Marine Iguana is a marine reptile native only to the Galapagos Islands. They have a natural ability to swim and move through the water with speed. This reptile can dive down to 30 feet to find food, holding its breath for over an hour. Male Marine Iguanas are larger than the females, and can grow up to 5 ½ feet long. The Galapagos Iguana evolved from its land-based cousin in order to become better suited to a marine lifestyle. As plant life here is rare, this iguana has adapted features such as webbed feet to allow it to forage for food out in the sea. The water is too cold for them to remain in it all the time, so they must bask on the rocks in order to regulate their body temperatures. - Appearance: Galapagos Marine Iguana’s have stocky bodies, a long tail, and webbed toes to propel themselves forward. In the water they are fast and agile but move very clumsily on land. The colouration of this Iguana ranges from black to a light shade of gray. Their darker colours help absorb the heat of the sun when basking. They have short spikes running down their back to deter predators and rivals. - Diet: The Marine Iguana is a herbivore, using its sharp teeth not for tearing meat but for scraping algae and seaweed from the rocks. Their flat snouts enable them to get into cracks and crevasses for algae too. As seaweed is more plentiful in warmer temperatures, this Iguana eats heavily in the spring and summer to store up fat for the winter, when food is scarce. - Habitat: The only location where this Lizard can be found is the Galapagos Islands. They tend to stay close to the shore, foraging for food in shallow waters or basking in the sun on the rocks. - Breeding: Galapagos Marine Iguanas are territorial, and mate during the summer months. The females must lay their eggs in as safe a place as possible, to avoid them being eaten by predators. Once laid, she will be gone. The young must take care of all their own needs from the moment they are born. Males of this species reach sexual maturity at around 6 to 8 years. - Status: The Marine Iguana is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species due to getting tangled up in fishing nets and plastic debris that humans leave along the beach. Luckily, this species is completely protected. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 2282 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Crocodile
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Crocodile in the series Reptiles and Amphibians - Enjoy :) - Brief Overview: Crocodiles are large reptiles belonging to the crocodilian family, which also includes caimans, alligators and gharials. There are 13 different species of crocodiles, the smallest of which is the dwarf crocodile, which grows to 5 and a half feet (1.5 meters) in length and weighs around 15 pounds (7 kilograms). The largest species is the saltwater crocodile, the biggest ever found was 20 feet (6 m) long. - Appearance: Crocodiles are well armoured with tough, scaly skin. They have a long tail and powerful limbs for pushing themselves through the water and walking on land. They are grey-green with long, slender V-shaped snouts, which distinguish them from the alligator, who have much broader, U-shaped snouts. Another relative, the gharial, has an elongated, narrow snout. - Diet: Crocodiles are carnivores, meaning they only eat meat. They prey on a diet of fish, mammals, birds, frogs and crustaceans. The diet of the Nile crocodile is mainly fish, but it will attack almost anything to cross its path, including zebras, small hippos, and sometimes other crocodiles. They clamp down on their prey with their massive jaws to crush it before swallowing it whole as they can’t chew their food like other animals. - Habitat: Crocodiles can be found in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia, usually near lakes, rivers, wetlands and even some saltwater areas. As they are cold blooded, they hibernate during the colder months in burrows they’ve dug out in the sides of river banks or lakes and settle in for a long sleep. - Breeding: Crocodiles mate in January and February. Females build a nest of loose dirt in a mound by the water’s edge and lay their eggs in clutches of 35 to 50 eggs. She will bury the eggs and guard her nest fiercely. In July to August, the eggs will hatch and the female will help to carefully carry them to the water in her jaws. However she will not continue to care for her young, unlike the alligator. - Status: The Cuban crocodile is among the world’s most threatened crocodile, listed as critically endangered on the IUCN red list of threatened species, with a population of around 4000 left. Other species, such as the American croc, are listed as vulnerable. Poaching is possibly crocodiles greatest threat, along with habitat loss. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 25319 Natural World Facts
British Wildlife - Red Squirrels
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Red Squirrel in the series Mammals. All footage taken by Leo R. Since Red Squirrels are so rare in the UK, I travelled to Jersey in the channel islands where there are only no Greys to film the elusive Reds. The Red Squirrel is the UK’s only native species of squirrel, and was once common across the UK, but now are listen as near threatened due to the introduction of the non-native grey squirrels from America. The grey’s carry a disease, known as squirrel poxvirus, which does not seem to have any affect on them but can be deadly to the native reds. Red squirrels inhabit coniferous forests and deciduous woodlands in Scotland, Northumberland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Lake District. They are most active in the mornings and late afternoon. Red squirrels are recognisable by their red to russet fur, ear tufts and long, fluffy tails. The colour of their coat can vary with some reds appearing very grey, brown and even black. They have a white underside. Grey squirrels are much stockier and rounder, without any ear tufts. Red squirrels are very elusive and spend most of their time in the tree canopy. They often communicate with a squeaky vocalisation noise. Red squirrels have a mainly herbivorous diet that includes seeds, hazelnuts, green acorns, fungus, bark, and sapwood. They also occasionally eat insects, young birds and bird’s eggs. Reds do not hibernate and, in Autumn, store fungi in trees to eat over the winter months when they are less active. When food is plentiful, they put on weight in autumn to keep them warm the winter. This is very important for breeding females for producing young in the spring. Red squirrels build large nests, called dreys, high up in the forks of tree trunks. They are usually solitary, only coming together to mate. In February to April, they produce 2 to 3 young, called kittens and often have a second litter from May to June. Outside of the mating season, red squirrels tend to live alone, but put on courtship displays called a mating chase through the trees in the spring. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 10821 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Python
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Python in the series Reptiles and Amphibians. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: Pythons are non-venomous snakes found in Asia, Africa, and Australia. The Python family contains some of the largest snakes in the world. Because they are so bulky, Pythons move by scooting forwards in a straight line. They are closely related to the Boas, the other family of large constricting snakes. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 3834 Natural World Facts
PondCam - Underwater Footage (Newts/Frogs)
 
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Watch the full video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JB1LcM_Thi4 Filmed using an Apeman Sports Action Camera 1080p Hd 12mp Waterproof Cam 170 Ultra - which I sank down into my pond. The resulting footage was way better than expected!
Views: 1334 Natural World Facts
Capybara Fact File - Mammals
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the capybara in the series Rodents. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: The Capybara is the worlds largest species of rodent. They are large semi-aquatic rodents native to Southern Central America. They can grow to be 130cm (4 ft) in length. They are very social animals and live in small family groups of around 10-20 members. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 811 Natural World Facts
British Wildlife - Bees
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Bee in the series British Wildlife. Watch extended bee footage: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgMTlvu_k2c All footage taken by Leo R. It’s springtime, meaning the garden is buzzing with the sound of bees, collecting pollen and nectar from a variety of flowers and blossom. They’re attracted to the bright colours and sweet smells of the flowers which rely on the bees to distribute their pollen. This is known as cross-pollination, which some plants require in order to produce seeds. The relationship between bees and flowers is symbiotic as the bees are also rewarded for their hard work by a sweet mixture of water and sugars called nectar which is produced by plants. There are around 250 species of UK bees, but they come under three main types: bumblebees, honeybees and solitary bees. The type flying around this lavender are honeybees. Bees have long tongues, called a proboscis, which they use to suck nectar from flowers. They keep the nectar in a special honey stomach and once this stomach is filled up, they return to the hive to make honey. The flowers produce the sweet nectar to attract pollinators like bees. When a bee lands on a flower it picks up pollen sacs from the stamen (the male reproductive organ of the flower) which stick to their feet and hairy bodies. When they fly to another flower, the pollen rubs off onto the stigma (the female reproductive organ of the flower) and the plant has been cross-pollinated. This makes fertilization possible, and a fruit, carrying seeds, can develop. Bees seem to be particularly attracted to blue flowers, and yellow flowers which appear blue to them. So if you’re hoping to attract bees to your garden, it’s a good idea to go for blue or yellow. Honey bees are about 15 mm long and are light brown in colour. They have oval-shaped bodies with light and dark stripes. The brightly coloured bodies of the honey bee serve as a warning to predators of the honey bees’ ability to sting. Bumblebees are larger and hairier than honeybees, with black and yellow banding. Along with honeybees, they can be found throughout the garden as well as in parks, woods, orchards and meadows in spring until late autumn. In winter, the bees in a bumblebee colony die off and only the queen bee survives. She usually burrows down in the soil to hibernate and then emerges in the spring to start a new colony. Honeybees, however, stay close together in their hive to keep warm, while solitary bees (which don’t live in hives) hibernate wherever they can find shelter. The distinctive ‘buzzing’ sound bees make is created when they flap their wings very fast (up to 200 times per second) which creates vibrations in the air, which we hear as buzzing. If they feel threatened, they flap their wings more so the buzzing gets louder. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 1526 Natural World Facts
Facts about Reindeer
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Reindeer in the series Mammals. Merry Christmas everyone!!!!! Reindeer (or Caribou) belong to the deer family, which also includes deer, elk and moose. However, reindeer are the only type of deer in which both the males and females grow antlers. These antlers fall off and regrow every year. A male's can grow up to 51 inches (130 centimeters) long, making them very useful when fighting. Male reindeer lose their antlers in November, but females keep theirs much longer. This means that Santa’s reindeer must have all been female, since they are depicted as having horns on December 24. Reindeer can be found in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, northern Europe and northern Asia in tundra, mountains and woodland habitats. They are very social creatures, and feed, travel and rest in herds. Reindeer are herbivores, which means they only eat vegetation. Their diet consists of herbs, ferns, mosses, grasses, shoots, fungi and leaves. In the winter, reindeer must dig through the snow with their antlers to find food. Although these animals can’t fly, they can reach speeds of up to 50 mph (80 km/h) when running. Reindeer are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red-list for threatened species, due to a 40 percent decline in population over the past 21 to 27 years. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6
Views: 13762 Natural World Facts
British Wildlife - Common Frog
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Common Frog in the series Reptiles and Amphibians. All footage taken by Leo R. Whilst poking around in my back garden pond, I stumbled upon one of britains most common amphibians, the Common Frog. In this video, I give you facts, footage and more about this intriguing animal. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 11801 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Lion
 
03:20
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Lion in the series Mammals. - Brief Overview: The Lion is the second largest big cat in the world behind the Tiger. Unlike other cats, lions are very social animals. They live in groups, called prides, which contain around 30 lions. A pride consists of up to three males, a dozen related females, and their young. Lions have a very powerful roar which can be heard up to 8 km (5 mi.) away. Males and females take on very different roles in the pride. Male lions spend their time guarding their territory and their cubs, whilst females are the primary hunters of the group. - Appearance: Lions fur is yellowy-brown in colour. Males are generally larger than females and have a distinctive reddish-brown mane of hair around their heads. The mane is to make the male look impressive to females and more intimidating to other males. The mane also protects the male's neck during fights over territory or mating rights. - Diet: Lions are carnivores, and prey on antelopes, buffalo, zebras, young elephants, rhinos, hippos, wild hogs, crocodiles and giraffes. They hunt by stealth, and since their prey is usually faster than them, Lions use teamwork to hunt by forming a semicircle and herding the prey towards the centre before attacking. All the lions in the pride will share the meal, but there is a pecking order, with the adult males eating first, followed by the lionesses, and then the cubs. - Habitat: African lions live in Angola, Botswana, Mozambique, Tanzania and the Central African Republic in scrub, grassland or open woodlands. They wander a territory of 100 square miles (260 square kilometers). Asiatic lions are found only in the Gir Forest National Park in India in deciduous forest, grasslands, scrub jungle and rocky hills. - Breeding: Lionesses have a gestation period of around four months and give birth to 2-3 cubs at a time. She will give birth to her young away from others and hide the cubs for the first six weeks of their lives as they will be completely dependent on their mother. All the females in a pride mate at the same time. After the first six weeks, the cubs are taken care of by all of the females and will often nurse from those other than their mother. - Status: African Lions are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list of threatened species, due to hunting, habitat loss and diseases spread from domestic dogs in nearby villages. Asiatic Lions are listed as endangered, with a population of only around 350 left. This is due to habitat loss. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 5053 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Manta Ray
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Manta Rays in the series Ocean Life. - Brief Overview: The Manta Ray is the worlds largest species of ray, and is among the largest of all fishes. It can grow 6–9 m wide and weight almost 2 tonnes! Manta Rays are often confused as a type of stingray, but they don’t have venomous barbed tails and are completely harmless. Their natural predators include large sharks and killer whales. - Appearance: They have flat bodies and are grey to black in colour. Their underside is white and they have short tails. They move similarly to birds, by slowly flapping their wings to move themselves forward. They have a distinctive body shape, with triangular pectoral ‘wings’ and paddle-like lobes extending in front of the mouth - Diet: Manta Rays are harmless filter-feeders, feeding on a diet of Krill and Plankton. It has no teeth on its upper jaw as it uses fleshy flaps on each side of its head to direct plankton into its mouth, which is on the underside of its body. Excess water is sieved out through the manta’s gills. - Habitat: The manta ray usually inhabits tropical and subtropical waters around the world, north and south of the Equator. Their flattened body is adapted for life on the sea floor, but the manta prefers open water close to the surface. Mantas are usually solitary, but sometimes form groups when feeding on a zooplankton swarm. They are thought to travel vast distances across the open ocean. They often visit coastal and offshore sites, and are commonly seen around oceanic islands, offshore pinnacles and seamounts. - Breeding: Like sharks, manta rays fertilises their eggs internally. They are ovoviviparous, meaning that the female hatches her eggs internally and then gives birth to live young, called pups. Female Manta Rays usually give birth to one or two pups at a time. At birth, mantas are about 1.2 m wide, and weigh about 45 kg! They spend the first few years of their life in shallow waters before heading further offshore. - Status: The manta ray is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of threatened species. They used to be hunted in Australian waters for their liver oil and skin. Today, it is very rarely hunted, although in some parts of the world its numbers are in decline. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 6304 Natural World Facts
British Wildlife - Common Toad
 
02:10
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Common Toad in the series Reptiles and Amphibians. All footage taken by Leo R. Whilst poking around under logs in Holland Park in London, I stumbled upon another of britains most common amphibians, the Common Toad (Bufo Bufo). In this video, I give you facts, footage and more about this intriguing animal. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 5302 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Great White Shark
 
03:03
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Great White Shark in the series Ocean Life - Enjoy :) - Brief Overview: Great White Sharks are the worlds largest predatory fish. They can grow to be around 15 to 20 feet, which is 4 to 6 metres long. They generally weigh up to 2300 kg (5000 lb.) Although they are massive, Great White Sharks are not the largest kind of shark. The whale shark is the largest, although is a filter feeder, and preys on krill and plankton. These fish are well adapted predators, with over 300 serrated, triangular teeth arranged in rows. They also have an acute sense of smell, being able to detect one drop of blood in 25 gallons (100 liters) of water. - Appearance: Great Whites are blue-grey on their upper side to blend in with the bottom of the ocean when viewed from above. They get their name from their white undersides, which make it difficult to see the sharks from below. They have streamlined, torpedo shaped bodies and powerful tails enabling them to reach speeds up to 24 km/hr (15 mph). - Diet: Great white sharks are carnivores, preying on a diet of seals, sea lions, sea turtles, carrion and even small whales. they search for prey at the surface while swimming below. When they hunt, they leave the water completely, breaching like whales when attacking prey from underneath. Surprisingly, Great White Sharks are far more ferocious in our minds than in reality. Though they are often seen as man-eaters, these animals are responsible for just 5 to 10 attacks per year. - Habitat: They can be found in cool coastal waters across the globe, but mostly along the coasts of Australia, South Africa, California and the northeastern United States. - Breeding: Great White sharks are Ovoviviparous, meaning the young develop and hatch inside the female and continue to develop until birth. They have an 11 month gestation period, the powerful jaws begin to develop in the first month. Birth is usually in Spring and Summer. - Status: Great White Sharks are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red-List of threatened species, mostly due to overfishing and accidental catching. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 17323 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Komodo Dragon
 
03:43
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Komodo Dragon in the series Reptiles and Amphibians. - Brief Overview: Komodo Dragons are the world’s largest living lizards. They are native to Indonesia and are locally known as an ora, or land crocodile. The size of an average male Komodo dragon is 8 to 9 feet, which is 2 metres and they can weigh up to 200 pounds. Females can grow to 6 feet, which is 1.8 metres. The average lifespan of a Komodo Dragon is more than 30 years. - Appearance: Komodo Dragons can be identified by their large size, flat heads, long muscular tails and strong legs for reaching speeds up to 13 miles per hour (20kph). They also have long, sharp claws for climbing trees. Their skin is tough and very thick, coated with bony plates called osteoderms. - Diet: Komodo Dragons are carnivores, meaning they only eat meat. They are very fierce hunters, meaning they can eat very large prey, including water buffalo, deer, pigs, carrion and even humans. They will even eat smaller dragons, and can consume up to 80% of their body weight in one feeding. Komodo Dragons have very good vision, being able to see objects as far away as 985 feet (300 metres). Their sense of smell is their main way of detecting prey. They use their forked tongues to taste the air and special organs in their mouths analyse the airborne molecules to pick up an animals scent. Komodo’s have a very unique way of killing their prey. Firstly, they will spring up and knock over the prey with their huge feet. They then use their sharp serrated teeth to rip their prey to shreds. If it escapes, it will die within 24 hours from blood poisoning. With its amazing sense of smell, the dragon will find the dead animal and finish its meal. - Habitat: Komodo Dragons can only be found on five islands in the wild, each within the Komodo National Park in Indonesia. They inhabit tropical dry forests, savannah and deciduous monsoon forests. They prefer extreme heat, around 95 degrees Fahrenheit (39 degrees Celsius). - Breeding: Komodo Dragons tend to be solitary outside of the mating season, which is between May and August. Females will lay up to 30 grapefruit-sized eggs each in September. The incubation period is around 3 months. Female Komodo’s also build fake ‘decoy’ nests to confuse predators and to keep the eggs safe. Female’s can also give birth through asexual reproduction, meaning they don’t need a male to fertilise their eggs for them to hatch. After birth, the newborn dragons aren’t cared for by their parents. In fact, they quickly run away up trees to avoid being eaten by their mothers or other dragons. - Status: The Komodo Dragon is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red-list for threatened species. There are an estimated 6000 left in the wild and they are protected within the Komodo National Park. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 9512 Natural World Facts
How to care for goldfish - Instructional Videos
 
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How To: Prepare the tank for goldfish: 0:18 How To: Buy your goldfish: 1:16 How To: Introduce your fish to the tank: 1:48 How To: Clean out your tank: 2:10 How To: Feed and care for your fish: 2:58 How to care for goldfish: -Preparing the tank: A small tank is good for beginners, but a larger tank is better for keeping more or larger fish. You must treat the water for your tank with AquaSafe (or similar brands) to neutralise harmful chemicals, and help clean the water to make it healthier for your fish. A pump/filter is compulsory for any tank as it air-rates the water and filters out any algae. Plants also help to oxygenate the water. -Buying your goldfish: Goldfish come in two groups, long bodied and short bodied. You must not mix these two groups as the long bodied ones are faster, so get to the food before the short bodied ones (which are fatter and slower). There should be one goldfish in your tank for every 10 or 20 litres. -Introducing the goldfish to your tank: When introducing your goldfish, DO NOT place the fish in your tank directly. Instead, rest the bag on the surface of the water for up to 20 minutes to allow the temperature of the water in the tank and in the bag to equalise. Once twenty minutes are up, you can gently release your goldfish into the tank. It is important to only introduce one goldfish at a time to your tank. You can also quarantine any new fish before placing them in your tank. -Cleaning out the tank: It is very important to clean out your goldfish tank regularly. You can do this be frequently cleaning the sides of the tank to avoid any algae from settling. However, every two weeks you must replace twenty% of the water with fresh water: •Syphon out 20% of the water. •Remove the pump or filter and thoroughly clean out any algae + replace the filter pads. •Fill up a large container with water •Treat the water with the appropriate amount of AquaSafe (or similar brands). Use 5ml for every 10 litres. •Slowly pour the treated water into the tank to avoid startling the fish. (Repeat until the tank is full). •Place the newly cleaned pump/filter back in the tank. THERE IS NO NEED TO REMOVE THE GOLDFISH FROM THE TANK WHILST YOU DO THIS! -Feeding your fish: You can feed your fish many different food items, from granules to live shrimps. I would personally recommend any sort of flakes to enhance the health, colour and vitality of your goldfish. Thank you for watching Natural World Facts http://naturalworldfactssite.weebly.com/ http://twitter.com/naturalwfacts Thanks for watching, comment rate and subscribe!!
Views: 972465 Natural World Facts
Facts about Penguins
 
03:59
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Penguins in the series Birds. - Brief Overview: Penguins are torpedo-shaped, flightless birds that can be found in the southern regions of the Earth. There are around 19 different species of penguin, the smallest of which is the little penguin. These birds grow around 10 to 12 inches (25 to 30 centimetres) tall. The largest penguin is the emperor penguin. It can grow to 36 to 44 inches (91 to 111 cm) tall and have a wingspan of 30 inches (76 cm). Emperor penguins live in the coldest climate on earth. Temperatures can drop as low as -95.6 °Celsius (-140°F) on the Antarctic ice. They breed in March and April at the beginning of the Antarctic winter on the ice all around the Antarctic continent. They live in large colonies of up to 20,000 birds. Emperor penguins live for about 20 years, although some have been known to live for 40 years. - Appearance: The shape of a penguin body is perfectly adapted to a life in the sea. They are fat in the middle and narrow at both ends. Their streamlined shape helps them move quickly through the water to catch prey. All species of penguin have black and white patterned feathers, a beak to catch food, and webbed feet to push themselves through the water. - Diet: Penguins are carnivores, meaning they eat only meat. Their diet consists of krill, squid and fish. Some species of penguin can make a large dent in an area's food supply. The emperor penguin can eat as much as six kilograms (thirteen pounds) of food per day. - Habitat: Penguins are marine birds, and spend up to 80 percent of their lives in the ocean. Penguins can be found on every continent in the Southern Hemisphere, in both cold and tropical climates. The Galapagos penguin, for example, lives on tropical islands at the equator. - Breeding: During the breeding season, penguins will come ashore to form huge colonies called rookeries. Most penguins are monogamous. This means that a male and female will continue to mate with each other for most of their lives. Penguins reach sexual maturity at around three to eight years old. Most species breed during the spring and summer. Female emperor penguins will only lay a single egg at a time, where all other species of penguins lay two eggs. The two parents will take turns holding the eggs between their legs for warmth in a nest. After the chicks emerge, the parents will take turns feeding their offspring with regurgitated food. - Status: According to the IUCN red list of threatened species, four penguin species are endangered: northern rockhopper, erect-crested, yellow-eyed, african and Galapagos penguins. Most of the other species of penguins are listed as vulnerable or threatened. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 10628 Natural World Facts
British Wildlife - Roe Deer
 
02:21
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Roe Deer in the series Mammals. All footage taken by Leo R. Whilst on location in Cumbria, I encounter one of Britains shyest mammals. The Roe Deer. In this video, I give you facts, footage and more about this intriguing animal. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 4363 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Cassowary
 
01:44
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Cassowary in the series Birds - Enjoy :) The cassowary is a large species of flightless bird found in the dense tropical forests of New Guinea and parts of north-eastern Australia. The cassowary is closely related to emus and ostriches, and is the third tallest and second heaviest bird in the world behind these two. As they have lost the ability to fly, these birds have instead developed the need to run up to speeds of over 30mph. The cassowary also has large, sharp claws to defend itself from danger. The most distinctive features of the cassowary are it's large body size, brightly coloured feathers and the crest on the top of the it's head. It is thought that this crest of cassowary is used for courtship or fighting. The cassowary is an omnivore, feeding on a wide variety of both plants and animals. Cassowaries mainly feed on fruits that have fallen to the ground, along with leaves, grasses, seeds, insects and other invertebrates. The cassowary is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red-list of threatened species, due to habitat loss and the introduction of predators. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6
Views: 8474 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Bald Eagle
 
02:55
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Bald Eagle in the series Birds. -Brief Overview: Bald eagles are large birds of prey native only to North America. Their wingspan can be about 7 feet (2.13 meters). When flying, the bald eagle very rarely flaps its wings but soars instead with its wings almost completely flat. The average lifespan of a bad eagle is 28 years in the wild and 36 years in captivity. -Appearance: Bald Eagles get their name because of their white heads which make it appear bald from a distance. They have a yellow beak and dark brown feathers on their wings and body. Their talons are yellowy orange. Newborn bald eagles are covered with light grey fluff. -Diet: Bald eagles are carnivores, which means they only eat meat. They prey mainly on fish. They will also eat smaller birds, other bird's eggs and small animals like rabbits, reptiles, amphibians and crabs. They hunt by grabbing their prey with their talons before ripping off chunks of meat with their beak as they don;t have teeth to chew. -Habitat: The bald eagle is found only in North America, and inhabits forests near rivers, lakes, reservoirs, marshes and coasts. They tend to live near water in Canada and Alaska as their main prey item is fish. -Breeding: Bald eagles are monogamous, which means they will continue to mate with the same partner for the rest of their lives. Their mating season is from late September to early April. A bald eagle will find another mate only if their partner dies. They make large nests from sticks, grass, feathers and moss for their eggs. Female bald eagles lay one to three eggs at a time and will incubate them for 34 to 36 days. The young bald eagles spend their first four years exploring and are already able to fly hundreds of miles per day. -Status: The bald eagle almost became extinct due to over-hunting leading to population decline. However, in the 1970s, the bald eagle population started to increase. Today, the bald eagle is listed as least concern on the IUCN red list of threatened species. There are currently more than 10,000 individuals in North America. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 3958 Natural World Facts
5 Wierd Animal Behaviours #2 - The blood-squirting lizard and more
 
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Hello and welcome to Natural World Facts, in this episode of wierd animal facts Leo will be talking about the sperm whales who adopted a dolphin with scoliosis, the time fish rained on England, the lizard that squirts blood from its eyes, the cuckoo, and the elephants who mourn their dead. - Number 5: The dolphin and the whales This piece of footage taken by scientists depicts a very rare interaction between a small pod of Sperm Whales and an adult bottlenose dolphin. The dolphin appears to have a spinal malformation called scoliosis, which is the abnormal twisting of the spine. This appeared to be the first time this type of friendly interaction had been observed in sperm whales, as the giant cetaceans usually avoid contact with these dolphins. Scientists spotted this event near the Azores Islands, an archipelago about 900 miles off the coast of Portugal. Although inter-species friendships are rare, this isn’t the first case of Dolphins befriending Whales. - Number 4: ‘It’s raining fish’ On the 6th August, 2000, In Norfolk, England, tiny two-inch fish called sprats came raining out of the sky. The phenomenon can be explained, however. Given strong enough winds in thunderstorms, small whirlwinds and mini-tornadoes may form. When these travel over water any small items of debris in their path, such as fish or frogs, may be picked up and can be carried several miles away. In this case, the fish were picked up from the lake by the strong winds, carried by the clouds over urban areas, and dropped. - Number 3: The cuckoo Cuckoo birds have a very interesting approach to parenting as they do not build a nest to lay their eggs in, but instead do so in other bird’s nests. They even rely on the other bird species to look after their young for them. The trick is, it is done without the other bird parent ever suspecting a thing. The cuckoo will wait for the mother to leave before quickly laying her eggs in the nest. Cuckoos have an amazing ability of disguising their own eggs to look similar to that of its nest partner’s. Once hatched, the baby trickster will also drop the other species eggs out of their own nest to secure her own survival. - Number 2: The blood squirting lizards Horned Lizards have a very unusual defensive reaction against their enemies. When threatened, they shoot an aimed stream of blood from out of their eyes by voluntarily increasing the blood pressure in their sinuses until they explode. This stream of blood can reach distances of up to 5 feet. Although the blood is not poisonous, it does create chaos and confusion to the attacker. - Number 1: Mourning elephants Elephants have exhibited a very strange yet familiar behaviour. Unlike many other animals, when a member of the herd dies, they will stay close beside it for some time. They even take leaves, dirt and branches and cover other elephants after they die. Even when they come across elephant bones, they appear to recognise that they belong to one of their species, and spend time investigating the bones in a subdued manner. This empathetic behaviour is a reminder of just how similar elephants are to ourselves. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 450 Natural World Facts
Weird Animal Behaviours #3 - Ocean crop circles and more
 
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Hello and welcome to Natural World Facts, in this episode of wierd animal facts Leo will be talking about the the praying mantids who eat their partners after sex, the drongo birds who trick meerkats, the manakin bird who's courtship display resembles a moonwalk, the ocean crop circles made by an unexpected little fish and the suriname sea toad which rears it's young in it's back. - Number 5: Insects that eat their partners A strange behaviour has been observed in mating pairs of Praying Mantids where, after mating, the female seems to attack and eat her partner alive. This may seem a very alien behaviour to us but it is not uncommon for mantids. The male is simply a high energy meal which the female eats to ensure that the eggs in her body mature faster. It has also been witnessed for the female to bite off and eat her partner’s head whilst she is still mating with him, and the mating process continues undisturbed. - Number 4: The trickster bird Drongos are the Kalahari’s most mischievous bird. First, he gains the trust of a pack of meerkats by calling a warning when he spots a danger such as an eagle, sending the meerkats scurrying for safety. Once they begin to trust him as their lookout, he sounds another warning; but it is a false alarm. With the meerkats abandoning their prey and scuttling off to their den, the drongo will swoop down and snatch the insects or scorpions they had found from the ground. A free meal in return for warning of danger. However, the meerkats will only fall for this trick once, yet the drongo has another trick up it’s sleeve. It can imitate the call of the meerkats own lookout guard, which they can not ignore, allowing him to snatch up their meal once again. - Number 3: Manakin bird Another bird species has also displayed a very unusual behaviour. The manakin from Brazil has a, let’s say unique approach to attracting a mate. The males put on a courtship display which appears to be a sort of moonwalk, sliding backwards across a branch. If the female manakin is satisfied with a male’s dance, she will mate with him. The competition between males is a fierce dance-off and only the best dancer will get to mate. - Number 2: Ocean crop circles In Japan, strange crop circle patterns have been found on the sandy seabed, resembling closely sci-fi crop circles thought to be left by alien spacecraft. It was discovered, however, that these patterns were actually made by small fishes, closely related to puffers. The males create these pieces of art to attract females. Fish as small as thirteen centimetres long manage to create patterns up to two metres in diameter. They create them by swimming along the bottom and shifting the sand with their lower fins. - Number 1: Suriname sea toad The suriname sea toad from south America has evolved a very rare way of rearing young. Rather than laying frogspawn and allowing her young to develop into tadpoles like most other frogs, this toad instead has laid her eggs in pockets on her back for extra protection. Her young develop there fully, emerging not as tadpoles but as fully formed frogs. When they emerge, they burst out from the skin on her back. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 603 Natural World Facts
Song Thrush Fact File - Birds
 
02:55
Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Song Thrush in the series Birds. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: The Song Thrush is a small songbird commonly found in parks, gardens, woodland and scrub. They have a wingspan of 34 cm. Song Thrushes do not fly in flocks as they are usually solitary. They are omnivores, and feast on a diet of worms, insects and fruit. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 611 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Whale Shark
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Whale Shark in the series Ocean Life. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: The whale shark is the largest species of fish. Despite their size, Whale Sharks are filter feeders and prey on a diet of Plankton, Krill, Algae and Plankton. They migrate towards the central western coast of Australia every spring to congregate for their breeding season. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 7686 Natural World Facts
Gorilla Fact File - Mammals
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Gorillas in the series Mammals. - Brief Overview: Gorillas are the worlds largest primate and are native only to Africa. There are two varieties of Gorilla, the mountain Gorilla and the Lowland Gorilla. The mountain gorilla inhabits the mountainous regions of central Africa, while the lowland gorilla lives in the flat, dense forests of central and western Africa. Though they are very similar, they do have a few differences. For example, mountain gorillas tend to have longer hair, whereas lowland gorillas have short, soft hair. Gorillas live in groups called troops or bands. A band of gorillas can have as many as 50 members. They are led by a dominant male, called a silverback, which can be identified by a grey strip of hair on his back. Throughout the day, different activities are designated to different times. Mornings and evenings are feeding time. In the middle of the day, gorillas take a nap, play with other gorillas or groom each other. At night, the gorillas settle down in patches of leaves and twigs to sleep. The average lifespan of a Gorilla is 35 years in the wild and over 50 years in zoos. - Appearance: Mountain gorillas have long black hair and stocky bodies. Lowland gorillas are built similarly but have red patches of fur on their heads and sides as well as thinner black hair than the mountain Gorillas. - Diet: Gorillas are usually herbivores. They consume vegetation such as wild celery, shoots, roots, fruit, tree bark and tree pulp, but they have been known to eat small animals and insects. A male can eat up to 40 lbs (18 kg) of vegetation each day. - Habitat: Mountain gorillas can be found in Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, on green, volcanic mountains. Lowland gorillas inhabit the forests of central and western Africa in Equatorial Guinea, Angola, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Congo, Gabon and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A group of gorillas can have a territory of up to 16 square miles (41 square kilometers). - Breeding: Like humans, female gorillas have a gestation period of nine months and usually give birth to only one infant at a time. Newborn gorillas weigh about 4 lbs (1.8 kg). Until they reach 2 or 3 years old, young gorillas ride on their mothers' backs as a form of transportation. At around 7 to 10 years, the young gorilla will become mature enough to have its own offspring. At this point, the gorilla will leave its group to find a mate. - Status: The mountain gorilla and Eastern lowland gorilla is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. This is due to poaching and habitat loss because of mining and agriculture. It is estimated that there are about 680 mountain gorillas left in two isolated populations. According to the IUCN, the Western lowland gorilla is critically endangered, with a population reduction of more than 80 percent over three generations. It is unknown exactly how many of these gorillas are left in the wild. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 3566 Natural World Facts
What Is Adaptation?
 
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CHECK OUT FIVE MINUTES: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjLuBE3yzhValzi1N61corQ SYMBIOSIS VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01mPCuWoXNk Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Adaptation. Hello and welcome to Natural World Facts, I'm Leo and today i’ll be talking about Adaptation. First of all, what is an Adaptation? Adaptations are the ways in which organisms change over time in response to the changing demands of their environment. Through adaptation, organisms can develop certain physiological, behavioral, and structural traits gradually to better their chances of survival. Adaptations usually develop in response to a change in the organisms habitat. One example of this happening is the English peppered moth. Before the 19th century, the most common variety of this moth was a creamy-colour with dark spots. Only a few peppered moths displayed colouring of grey or black. As the Industrial Revolution drastically changed the environment, the appearance of the peppered moth changed and the darker-coloured moths, which were much rarer than the cream ones, started to thrive in the urban atmosphere. This was because their sooty colour blended in with the trees stained by industrial pollution. Birds couldn’t see the dark moths, so they ate the cream-coloured moths instead, which stood out among the blackened trees. In this example, the moths are adapting their camouflage to blend in with their changing environment in order to be protected from predators. In some cases, an organism can develop a set of adaptations that create an entirely new species. This process is known as speciation. An organism becoming isolated can lead to speciation. The huge variety of marsupials in Oceania is an example of how organisms adapt to an isolated habitat. Marsupials, mammals that carry their young in pouches, arrived in Oceania before the land split with Asia. Placental mammals, animals that carry their young in the mothers womb, dominated every other continent except Oceania, meaning there was no competition for the marsupials. Organisms can sometimes adapt alongside or with other organisms. This is known as coadaptation. Certain flowers have adapted their pollen to attract hummingbirds. The hummingbirds have adapted long, thin beaks to extract the pollen from those flowers. In this relationship, the hummingbird gets food, while the plants pollen is distributed. The coadaptation is beneficial to both organisms, and is also a type of symbiotic relationship called mutualism. Watch my other video on symbiosis here.Mimicry is another example of coadaptation. With mimicry, one organism adapts to resemble another. The harmless milk snake (king snake) has adapted a colour pattern that almost directly resembles the deadly coral snake. This mimicry keeps predators away from the milk snake as they confuse it for the venomous coral snake.The mimic octopus has behavioral as well as structural adaptations. This species of octopus can mimic the look and behavior of other animals such as sea stars, crabs, jellyfish, and shrimp to disguise itself from predators. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 109729 Natural World Facts
Blue Whale Fact File - Mammals
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Blue Whale in the series Ocean Life. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: The Blue Whale is the largest animal ever to have lived on the Earth. They can grow to reach over 30 metres (100 ft) in length and more than 200 tonnes in weight. Their tongue alone can weigh as much as an Elephant and their hearts as much as a car. Somehow, these giants reach their huge sizes by feasting on a diet of purely Krill. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 3206 Natural World Facts
Nature's Wonders - The Great Wildebeest Migration
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Great Wildebeest Migration in the new series Nature's Wonders. The great Serengeti wildebeest migration is one of the largest migrations in the world. Each year, thousands of Wildebeest migrate north from the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania to the greener grazing areas of the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. The Migration begins in April, as the herds start moving north towards Kenya. Huge columns of Wildebeest up to 40km in length can be seen as the wildebeest funnel up into the central and western Serengeti. But with such a multitude e of animals congregating in one place, its inevitable that it will attract predators. It’s July, and the Wildebeest meet their greatest obstacle yet on this migration, the Crocodile-Infested waters of the Mara River. In order to continue their 1,800 mile long journey, they must first risk their lives and cross these dangerous brown waters. They are weary at first, but as soon as one goes, the rest follow. The crocs go in for the kill, swarming and surrounding the Wildebeest. The ordeal is finally over, but not without the cost of so many lives along the way. (SHOW FOOTAGE OF DEAD ONES AND CROCS EATING) Many of those who aren’t killed by crocs have drowned instead or been trampled in the frenzy. In the struggle for survival, nothing goes to waste. The survivors are rewarded by the green grazing plains of the Serengeti, however the journey is not yet over. In January the herds must return to the Serengeti only to set off once again in April. Thank you for watching Natural World Facts, see you next time! I do not own the footage or music in this video. All credit goes to real owners. No copyright infringement intended. Music: Edge of the world - Jeff Broadbent and: Spirit of Darkness - Music Junkies Footage: BBC Earth/PBS Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next.
Views: 2124 Natural World Facts
What Is Evolution?
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about What Is Evolution. Okay, so first of all, what is Evolution? The theory of evolution by natural selection is the process through which organisms change over time as a result of changes in physical or behavioural traits. These changes will allow an organism to adapt better to its environment and thus help it survive and have more offspring.  Natural selection can change a species in very small ways, causing a population to change colour or size over the course of several generations. This is called “microevolution." But natural selection is also capable of a lot more. Given enough time and enough accumulated changes, natural selection can create entirely new species, known as "macroevolution." It was able to turn dinosaurs into birds, amphibious mammals into whales and the ancestors of apes into humans. For example, In "The Origin of Species,” Charles Darwin came up with a theory about how natural selection could cause a land mammal to turn into a whale. Darwin used North American black bears as an example, which were known to catch fish by swimming in the water with their mouths open. The transition of early whales from land to water happened in a series of predictable steps. The evolution of the blowhole, for example, might have happened through random genetic changes that resulted in at least one whale having its nostrils placed farther back on its head. Those animals with this adaptation would have been more suited to a marine lifestyle, as they would not have had to completely surface to breathe. Such individuals would have been more successful and produced more offspring. Other body parts of early whales also changed. Front legs became flippers. Back legs disappeared as they were no longer needed, Their bodies became more streamlined and they developed large tails to propel themselves through water. Darwin also theorised a form of natural selection that depends on an organism's success at attracting a mate, a process known as sexual selection. The brightly coloured plumage of peacocks and the antlers of male deer are both examples of traits that evolved to better their chances of reproducing. The physical and behavioural changes that make natural selection possible happen because of mutations of an animals DNA and genes. Mutations can be caused by random errors in the DNA, or by chemical damage. Mutations are usually harmful or neutral, but sometimes a mutation can be beneficial to the organism and allow it to become better suited to its lifestyle. If so, it will become more successful in the next generation and spread throughout the population. In this way, natural selection is guiding the process of evolution by keeping and preserving the beneficial mutations and rejecting the bad ones through the animals success. But where is the evidence for all this? Although scientists could predict what early whales should look like, they hadn’t found the fossil evidence to back them up. Creationists took this as proof that evolution didn't occur and mocked the idea that there could ever have been a walking whale. But in 1994, palaeontologists found the fossilised remains of ‘Ambulocetus natans', an animal whose name translates as "swimming-walking whale." Its forelimbs had fingers and small hooves but its hind feet were enormous for its size. It was distinctly adapted for swimming, but it was also capable of moving clumsily on land, much like a seal. When it swam, it moved much like an otter, pushing back with its hind feet and rolling its spine and tail side to side. Modern whales move through the water using powerful beats of their horizontal tails, but Ambulocetus had a whip-like tail and used its legs for propulsion through water. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 681 Natural World Facts
What Is Symbiosis?
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about explaining What Is Symbiosis. Join Leo, our presenter, as he tells you all about Symbiosis. What is symbiosis? Okay, so first of all. Just what is symbiosis? Well… symbiosis is relationship where two different species co-exist and at least one derives benefit from the other. The name for an organism with a symbiotic relationship is a symbiont. Two animals of the same species can have symbiotic relationships. What are some examples of symbiotic relationships? Clownfish are a common example of symbiosis. They benefit from an anemone by living inside it and being protected from predators who, if they came too near, would find themselves stung. In return, the anemone benefits from the clownfish, who help increase the oxygen flow by wiggling in and out of the tentacles. This is a mutualism relationship as the two partners rely on each other. Another example is between barnacles and whales. Barnacles rely on currents to bring food past them in order to eat. However, some have attached themselves to the sides of various sea life, such as whales, in order to have a better position for catching food. This is an example of commensalism as the the whale neither benefits nor is harmed by the barnacles. The last type of symbiosis, parasitism, can be portrayed by a cow and a tick. The tick feeds off the cows blood for food and nourishment. The cow, in return, is now more vulnerable to diseases and infection. Only the tick benefits in this parasitic relationship and is also obligate. An obligate relationship means either one or both partners cannot live without the other. In this case, the tick needs the cow for all its needs. What are the different types of Symbiosis? There are multiple different versions of symbiotic relationships in which the two partners are benefitted in different ways. When both partners benefit from their relationship, it is known as mutualism. They rely on each other for food or protection in return for something else. However, sometimes only one of the partners benefit. An example of this is parasitism. The parasite gets nourishment from a host, usually without killing it. Parasites are never beneficial to their host, and unlike in mutualism the host gets nothing in return for the parasite feeding off it. In addition to mutualism and parasitism, there is another variety of symbiosis, called commensalism. Similar to parasitism, in a commensalism relationship only one of the two organisms or species is benefitted, but in this case it manages to do so without causing any harm to the host. Mutualism is different from the other two types of symbiosis, because in this variety both the creatures benefit. Therefore, there is no host, and the partners are equal, however one of them will tend to be more dominant. Most types of mutualism are facultative, meaning that the partners can live apart successfully. Whereas some relationships of mutualism are so close that the interacting species are unable to live without each other. A symbiotic relationship where the partners would be unable to continue living if separated is known as an obligate relationship. In commensalism or parasitism, the relationship is usually obligate for the parasite, since they depend on the host for almost all their needs. At the same time the host is in a facultative relationship because it does not need the parasite and would be better off without it. One variety of commensalism is inquilinism, in which the commensal species makes use of the host's nest or habitat, without inconveniencing the host. Lets say theres a bird nesting in a tree in your garden. Suppose you benefit from the bird, through enjoying its song or its colours. This relationship could be an example of mutualism as the bird also benefits by using your garden (or your habitat) as a place of shelter. The bird example is also a case of inquilinism; as it is using your garden non-intrusively and is not inconveniencing you, the host. However, if the bird had been inconveniencing you, by either flying into your house and stealing food or just leaving their bird droppings on the carpet, it would be very similar to parasitism where the bird is taking advantage of you by stealing your food whilst also inconveniencing you by leaving your carpet bleached white with feaces. Inquilinism is sort of a cross between commensalism and parasitism. There are cases of a creature using another's habitat in a parasitic way. Such the European cuckoo, which leaves its offspring in the nests of other birds to be raised by them. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 21754 Natural World Facts
Cheetah Fact File - Mammals
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Cheetah in the series Mammals. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: The Cheetah is the fastest land animal. They can go from 0-60 miles an hour in under 3 seconds. Their top speed is 70 miles per hour and their average lifespan is 10-12 years, Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 962 Natural World Facts
Facts about the Rhinoceros
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Rhinoceros in the series Mammals. Join Leo, our presenter, as he tells you all about the Rhinoceros and it's appearance, diet, habitat, breeding facts and conservation status. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Brief Overview: The Rhinoceros is a large, herbivorous mammal. Their name comes from the Greek words "rhino" (nose) and "ceros" (horn). Rhinos spend their days and nights grazing and only sleep during the hottest parts of the day. Though rhinos are usually solitary, they sometimes form groups called crashes, these groups are made up of one dominant male, a female and her offspring. The dominant male rules over an area of land. The male will allow some sub-dominate males to live on his territory. The females will roam freely around several different territories. The average lifespan of a rhino is 45 years. Appearance: All rhino species have a long pointed horn on their snout. Their bodies are short and stocky and they hang low above the ground. Their colouring can range from yellowish brown to grey. Diet: Rhinoceroses are herbivores, which means they only eat vegetation. The type of vegetation they eat varies by species. This is due to the fact their snouts are different shapes. The black rhino has long lips to allow it to pick leaves and fruit from high up. The white rhino has a flat-shaped snout that allows it to graze on the ground. Habitat: White rhinos and black rhinos inhabit in the grasslands and floodplains of eastern and southern Africa. Greater one-horned rhinos can be found in the swamps and rain forests of northern India and southern Nepal. Sumatran and Javan rhinos are found only in small areas of Malaysian and Indonesian swamps and rain forests. Breeding: Every two and a half to five years, a female rhino will reproduce. Female rhinos have a gestation period of around 15 to 16 months. They usually only have one calf at a time, though they can have twins. At birth, baby rhinos can weigh up to 88 to 140 pounds (40 to 64 kg). At around 3 years old, the calf will be mature enough to set out on its own. Status: According to the IUCN red list of threatened species, most species of rhino are listed as critically endangered with fewer than 100 sumatran rhinos left in the wild. It is estimated that there were 500,000 rhinos across Africa and Asia at the beginning of the 20th century. Today, there are 29,000 rhinos in the wild. Poaching and loss of habitat have put all rhino species in danger of extinction. The Rhinoceroses horns are often used in folk medicine for their supposed healing properties, leading to rhinos being hunted nearly to extinction. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. http://naturalworldfactssite.weebly.com/ http://twitter.com/naturalwfacts
Views: 15661 Natural World Facts
What Is Migration? (In Animals)
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about Animal Migrations. Migration is nearly universal within the animal kingdom; Animals across the globe, from birds and mammals to reptiles and insects, migrate for a whole variety of different reasons. So why do animals migrate? Well, resources on Earth fluctuate and change constantly. Warm summer months may be followed by inhospitable cold. Plants may be in abundance in one place, but only for a short time. The best place to find food may not be a good place to give birth or hatch young. All these changing factors lead to animals needing to move to a better suited environment at different times of the year. The motivations behind migrations are simple. Food, breeding and climate. For humpback whales, the best place to feed isn't the best place to reproduce. During warmer months, these whales feed in nutrient-rich waters where prey is abundant. However, they mate and give birth in warm waters that contain little food. These whales will journey as far as 5,000 miles (8,047 km) to their suitable breeding grounds, meaning they will go without eating throughout the winter. For the Pacific salmon, migration is a vital part of its life. After spending their adult lives in the ocean, these fish journey up against the current of freshwater rivers where they were born to hatch the next generation. Once they have spawned their young, they die. It's a difficult and dangerous task just to reproduce, and only one in a thousand salmon will live to return to the stream where it was hatched. This migration is a vital part of this species life cycle, enabling it to spawn offspring and continue its life cycle. But how do all these animals know where to go? Migrant animals can use the sun and stars, the Earth's magnetic field and their sense of smell to find their way. Some migratory birds navigate using landmarks such as coastlines, mountains or even man-made structures such as motorways! Bird migration is usually a seasonal movement between breeding and wintering grounds. They migrate to move from areas of low or decreasing resources to areas of high or increasing resources, including food and suitable nesting locations. No-where in the world is there a movement of animals as huge as the wildebeest migration. Over two million animals migrate from the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania to the greener grazing areas of the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya from July to October. The migration can be very dangerous, the wildebeest have to cross the Mara River where crocodiles will prey on them. It shows what risks some animals will take to feed and rear their young. Overall, migrations are usually in response to the changing demands of an animal, wether it be food, breeding grounds or a changing climate. Animals can manage to adapt to certain migrations over generations, and can follow them each year using guides such as the sun, landmarks, and natural instincts. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 16615 Natural World Facts
What Is An Ecosystem?
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about What Is an Ecosystem. Okay, so first of all. Just what is an Ecosystem? An ecosystem is a complete community of living organisms and the nonliving materials of their surroundings. This includes plants, animals, microorganisms and their environment, such as soil, rocks, and minerals. An Ecosystem also consists of the local atmosphere. Animals and plants within an ecosystem depend on each other for their survival. If conditions change, they need to adapt quickly to survive. Ecosystems can be a variety of different sizes, ranging from an entire rain forest to a small puddle or your garden. Even an animal could be considered an ecosystem, containing many microorganisms. But some of the much larger examples, such as deserts, tundra, coral reefs or forests are called biomes. In each of these, the animals and plant life all depend on each other in different ways. Herbivores rely on the plants (also called producers) as a food source, and carnivorous animals will prey on those herbivores. This is called a food chain, and when all the food chains in an ecosystem are joined up together they form a food web. But what would happen if one species in the food web started to decline? For example, slugs, rabbits and insects all eat grass. If there were fewer slugs there would be more grass for the rabbits and insects. With more food the populations of rabbits and insects would increase. However, the thrushes (which prey on the insects and slugs) would have to eat more insects to compensate for the fewer slugs, so the population of insects could decrease. Every ecosystem consists of some form of food web. So, in a way, ecosystems are basically made up of systems of life. Okay… so what are the components of an ecosystem? There are two different types of components, the Abiotic factors and the Biotic factors. The Abiotic factors are the nonliving components which make up the environment of the ecosystem, such as the amount of sunlight, the temperature, the amount of rainfall or how much moisture there is in the air. The Biotic factors of an ecosystem, on the other hand, are the living features, such as the producers, herbivores, carnivores, omnivores and detrivores. These living features are also the main components of a food chain, the producers being the plants at the bottom, being eaten by the herbivores which are then eaten by the carnivores. Ecosystems also go through a number of processes, they have energy flows and cycle materials. The energy is first consumed by the plants through photosynthesis, and is converted to heat energy. The animals in an ecosystem also obtain elements such as carbon, nitrogen, or phosphorus from their environment. All these materials are then excreted or broken down by decomposers from an animals corpse. Decomposers and scavengers break down dead plants and animals and their excrement. Decomposers are very important for all ecosystems. If they didn’t exist, the plants wouldn’t get their essential nutrients, and all the dead matter and waste would pile up and the energy and materials wouldn’t be cycled through the ecosystem. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 72777 Natural World Facts
Grey Squirrels Fact File - Mammals
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Grey Squirrel in the series Rodents. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: The Grey Squirrel is thought to have been brought over from America, and is putting the local Red Squirrels under threat by taking all their food. They feed on acorns, chestnuts and other plants seeds. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 1516 Natural World Facts
Peregrine Falcon Fact File - Birds
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Peregrine Falcon in the series Birds. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. QUICK FACTS: The Peregrine Falcon is the worlds fastest species of bird. It can reach speeds of up to 322 kilometres per hour. It is a very widespread animal, and is native to most of Europe and America. Their average wingspan is around 74-120 cm. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 3886 Natural World Facts
Sea Slugs Fact File - Ocean Life
 
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Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts! This fact file is all about the Sea Slug in the series Ocean Life. Natural World Facts is a channel dedicated to bringing you fascinating facts about our natural world, and the wonderful animals that we share it with. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 1903 Natural World Facts
Dolphins Facts - On Location in Australia
 
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All footage taken by Leo R of NWF - Whilst on location in Western Australia, I encountered a pod of bottlenose dolphins when out on a boat. Welcome to another episode of Natural World Facts This fact file is all about Dolphins in the series Mammals. Dolphins are highly intelligent marine mammals and can be found worldwide, usually in shallow seas. They are carnivores, mostly eating fish, squid and crustaceans. Bottlenose Dolphins are grey in colour, and have a distinctive dorsal fin which appears when they come up to breath at the surface. They are very social animals, travelling in groups from 5 individuals up to several hundred. Dolphins usually only give birth to one calf, which will still stay with its mother until it is 3 to 8 years old. Although they can hold their breath for up to 7 minutes, dolphins must frequently come up to breath. This means they can never fully sleep as one side of their brain must always be active so that they remember to breathe. Dolphins have an incredible sense of hearing. Sounds travel through their lower jaw to their inner ear, allowing them to communicate with each other using a variety of whistles, and clicks. They create these sounds using nasal sacs in their heads. Dolphins produce high-frequency clicks that humans can’t hear. When the clicking sound reaches an object, it echoes back to the dolphin. They then process this information to determine the shape, size, speed, distance, and location of the object. This is called Echolocation. Bottlenose dolphins use echolocation when hunting for prey. They have around 20 pairs of sharp, teeth on each side of their jaw, but usually swallow their prey whole. They consume 8-15 kg (15-30 lbs.) food per day. They usually cooperate in groups to capture prey, taking turns herding fish into smaller areas while others swim through and snap the fish up. Bottlenose Dolphins are listed as least concern on the IUCN red-list of threatened species, and have a lifespan of 40 to 50 years. Their dorsal fin, along with their powerful, broad, tail, allows them to swim at speeds up to 35 km/h (22 mph) and dive as deep as 915 m (3000 ft.) Dolphins are also very playful animals, often following boats or rolling over in the water. This playfulness is often considered a sign of their renowned intelligence. Subscribe for more videos! Leave a suggestion in the comments for what animal you would like to learn about next. OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
Views: 814 Natural World Facts
Wildlife of Africa Documentary #1 - Wild Zambezi
 
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After almost a year's absence from youtube, Leo is back with a brand new half-hour documentary filmed in Africa in the summer of 2017. Join Leo on his journey across southern Africa to explore the fascinating wildlife that calls Africa home. In the first episode of this two-part series, the Natural World Facts team head to Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe before travelling to Chobe National Park in Botswana. This documentary has been nearly one year in the making, so we hope you enjoy. Watch part 2, Wild Delta, here: (Coming Soon) All footage is original and filmed by the NWF team. ============================================== Music credit: Accralate - The Dark Contenent by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100341 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Bumba Crossing by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1500031 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ At The Shore - The Dark Contenent by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100770 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Music: ‘I Can Fly' used with permission by Rommel Reyes and Ro Reyes Media. Music: ‘Wild at Heart’ used with permission by Jonny Easton Music: Instrumental cover of 'Dirty Paws by Of Monsters and Men' by Marcel M (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-WasbmdFjo) Music: Instrumental cover of 'Yellow Light by Of Monsters and Men' by George Marinosyan (https://soundcloud.com/george-marinosyan/yellow-light-instrumental-of-monsters-and-men) OUR WEBSITE: http://goo.gl/Ngj5V6 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/U4T8JX
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