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Principles of the UK Constitution
 
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A brief summary of key U.K. constitutional principles.
Views: 1092 Cram Class
Historical Development of the UK Constitution
 
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This A Level Politics topic video explains the key features of the historical development of the UK Constitution.
Views: 12297 tutor2u
UK constitution (part 1)
 
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An introduction to what the constitution is and where the UK constitution comes from (sources).
Views: 25686 LearnLoads
The British Constitution
 
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John Bingley explains the British Constitution at a British Constitution Group conference.
Constitutional Law - Rule of Law
 
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GET THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR $10! - https://goo.gl/wGcMuF For Private Tutoring: [email protected] Enroll in the Online Law School: https://www.patreon.com/TheLawSimplified NEW! Public Law on Kindle - http://bit.ly/PublicLawKindle Recommended Reading: Q&A Public Law by Richard Glancey (Kindle Edition) - http://amzn.to/2g56Wvq Q&A Public Law by Richard Glancey (Paperback Edition) - http://amzn.to/2fADCcu Constitutional & Administrative Law by Hilaire Barnett - http://amzn.to/2gLj1Hj For complete courses, including Spider Graphs and Case Summaries, visit: English Legal System: http://www.udemy.com/learn-english-law/ Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/N1PM61 Contract Law: https://goo.gl/MBC7A8 Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/wGcMuF Property Law: https://goo.gl/tGExGJ Tort Law: https://goo.gl/GAhG6p Trust Law: https://goo.gl/9JHgRH Intellectual Property: https://goo.gl/4z9eJG Jurisprudence: https://law.vhx.tv Commercial Law: https://goo.gl/r22QDr Conflict of Laws: https://goo.gl/TVzZmj History of English Law: https://goo.gl/A22PDL GET ALL COURSES FOR $69! https://goo.gl/9K5UXs Examination Techniques: ACE Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/JiHNp7 ACE Contract Law: https://goo.gl/rp4Vh9 ACE Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/swxuCc ACE Tort Law: https://goo.gl/1BLVCe FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/TheLawSimplified GOOGLE+: http://www.plus.google.com/+TheLawSimplified INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/thelawsimplified
Views: 158828 The Law Simplified
UK Constitutional Reform in under 15 mins!!
 
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Some clarification on EVEL (and thanks to Anagzable for pointing this out.) As often happens with Constitutional Reform, we have something that it is half of one thing and half of another that really does little to solve matters or please anyone. Essentially, there is an extra stage introduced that is open only to MPs from England and Wales. This really does precious little but allow MPs to kill the bill at that point, but of course because most bills are introduced by gov't and the gov't enjoys a majority then it is hard to see exactly what this really achieves. The bill then returns to the whole house where it will go through the usual stages. So, yes, we have an extra EVEL stage but that is about it and Scottish MPs will still have a say in legislation that doesn't affect them. More details can be found here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-33370064
Views: 4946 Bert Fegg
Constitutional Law - Separation of Powers
 
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GET THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR $10! - https://goo.gl/wGcMuF For Private Tutoring: [email protected] Enroll in the Online Law School: https://www.patreon.com/TheLawSimplified NEW! Public Law on Kindle - http://bit.ly/PublicLawKindle Recommended Reading: Q&A Public Law by Richard Glancey (Kindle Edition) - http://amzn.to/2g56Wvq Q&A Public Law by Richard Glancey (Paperback Edition) - http://amzn.to/2fADCcu Constitutional & Administrative Law by Hilaire Barnett - http://amzn.to/2gLj1Hj For complete courses, including Spider Graphs and Case Summaries, visit: English Legal System: http://www.udemy.com/learn-english-law/ Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/N1PM61 Contract Law: https://goo.gl/MBC7A8 Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/wGcMuF Property Law: https://goo.gl/tGExGJ Tort Law: https://goo.gl/GAhG6p Trust Law: https://goo.gl/9JHgRH Jurisprudence: https://law.vhx.tv Commercial Law: https://goo.gl/r22QDr Conflict of Laws: https://goo.gl/TVzZmj History of English Law: https://goo.gl/A22PDL GET ALL COURSES FOR $50! https://goo.gl/9K5UXs Examination Techniques: ACE Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/JiHNp7 ACE Contract Law: https://goo.gl/rp4Vh9 ACE Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/swxuCc ACE Tort Law: https://goo.gl/1BLVCe FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/TheLawSimplified GOOGLE+: http://www.plus.google.com/+TheLawSimplified INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/thelawsimplified
Views: 85218 The Law Simplified
Constitutional Law - Parliamentary Sovereignty
 
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GET THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR $10! - https://goo.gl/wGcMuF For Private Tutoring: [email protected] Enroll in the Online Law School: https://www.patreon.com/TheLawSimplified NEW! Public Law on Kindle - http://bit.ly/PublicLawKindle Recommended Reading: Q&A Public Law by Richard Glancey (Kindle Edition) - http://amzn.to/2g56Wvq Q&A Public Law by Richard Glancey (Paperback Edition) - http://amzn.to/2fADCcu Constitutional & Administrative Law by Hilaire Barnett - http://amzn.to/2gLj1Hj For complete courses, including Spider Graphs and Case Summaries, visit: English Legal System: http://www.udemy.com/learn-english-law/ Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/N1PM61 Contract Law: https://goo.gl/MBC7A8 Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/wGcMuF Property Law: https://goo.gl/tGExGJ Tort Law: https://goo.gl/GAhG6p Trust Law: https://goo.gl/9JHgRH Jurisprudence: https://law.vhx.com Commercial Law: https://goo.gl/r22QDr Conflict of Laws: https://goo.gl/TVzZmj History of English Law: https://goo.gl/A22PDL GET ALL COURSES FOR $50! https://goo.gl/9K5UXs Examination Techniques: ACE Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/JiHNp7 ACE Contract Law: https://goo.gl/rp4Vh9 ACE Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/swxuCc ACE Tort Law: https://goo.gl/1BLVCe FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/TheLawSimplified GOOGLE+: http://www.plus.google.com/+TheLawSimplified INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/thelawsimplified
Views: 57365 The Law Simplified
Constitutional law expert on UK Brexit ruling
 
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(3 Nov 2016) A law professor said an appeal of the High Court ruling stating that the British prime minister can't trigger the UK's exit from the European Union without parliamentary approval was unlikely to succeed. Jeff King, of University College London, said Thursday's comprehensive ruling on an expansive set of grounds could cause the government's argument to fail. But King cautioned that those hoping for a reversal of the referendum result would likely be disappointed. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1052e88d9a29941750b09fe3103adf78 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 563 AP Archive
Constitutional Law - Introduction
 
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GET THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR $10! - https://goo.gl/wGcMuF For Private Tutoring: [email protected] Enroll in the Online Law School: https://www.patreon.com/TheLawSimplified NEW! Public Law on Kindle - http://bit.ly/PublicLawKindle Recommended Reading: Q&A Public Law by Richard Glancey (Kindle Edition) - http://amzn.to/2g56Wvq Q&A Public Law by Richard Glancey (Paperback Edition) - http://amzn.to/2fADCcu Constitutional & Administrative Law by Hilaire Barnett - http://amzn.to/2gLj1Hj For complete courses, including Spider Graphs and Case Summaries, visit: English Legal System: http://www.udemy.com/learn-english-law/ Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/N1PM61 Contract Law: https://goo.gl/MBC7A8 Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/wGcMuF Property Law: https://goo.gl/tGExGJ Tort Law: https://goo.gl/GAhG6p Trust Law: https://goo.gl/9JHgRH Jurisprudence: http://law.vhx.tv Commercial Law: https://goo.gl/r22QDr GET ALL COURSES FOR $50! https://goo.gl/9K5UXs Examination Techniques: ACE Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/JiHNp7 ACE Contract Law: https://goo.gl/rp4Vh9 ACE Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/swxuCc ACE Tort Law: https://goo.gl/1BLVCe FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/TheLawSimplified GOOGLE+: http://www.plus.google.com/+TheLawSimplified INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/thelawsimplified
Views: 22156 The Law Simplified
Does Britain have a Constitution?
 
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Some interesting facts about the EU below. 1. The Queen has signed 6 of the 7 EU Treaties. 2. The 6 treaties define and build the EU as an unelected dictatorship. 3. The EU's laws give it the powers of a police state. 4. The 7th EU treaty will complete the abolition of Britain as a nation - the Queen could sign it in as little as two years. Shouldn't we repeal the 1972 European Communities Act now before we are imprisoned inside? 5. Thirty four years inside the EU - have you noticed how our democracy is being withdrawn? The EU has denied us that most basic of human rights - the right to vote against the EU and to keep our own nation. A majority of us don't want to be in the EU. We are being forced in against our will. Do you feel you've become powerless, or your vote is worth less? The six treaties are removing our democracy and harmonising our laws with the EU; 70% of Parliament's new laws are the EU's, not ours. Isn't the real reason people have lost interest in politics precisely because the EU has taken away our ability to change things? Common law, where government was our servant, is now largely replaced by the EU's Corpus Juris, where the government is the ruler, we are the ruled, and don't participate. We have lost most of our rights (including habeas corpus). The power of government grows unchecked. Yet politicians lie about the EU, pretending its not significant. 6. Massive EU corruption The EU's auditors have found the fraud is so widespread they've refused to sign the EU's accounts for ten years. Whistleblowers like Marta Andreason, the EU Budget Director, who in 2005 found the EU couldn't account for 95% of its £66 billion budget, are simply fired for telling the truth. 7. The bribing of our Politicians by the EU Europe works by bribing politicians with huge salaries and expenses to vote for Europe, against the best interests of their voters. So Labour, Conservatives and the Lib Dems are all in favour of the EU - a Westminster one party state. 8. EU corruption is exploding in our Civil Service, local government, and 7,000+ quangos. Common Purpose is the glue that enables fraud to be committed across government departments, most of it lining the pockets of politicians and bureaucrats. It often involves the sale of public assets such as land to friends of politicians or their businesses. The CEO of Common Purpose is Julia Middleton of the ODPM. 9. Businesses closing under EU regulation The EU's 111,000 regulations will close hundreds of thousands more businesses when fully enforced, and control our private lives more closely than those of Soviet citizens. (In a Parliamentary answer to Lord Stoddart in January 2003, the government said there were 101,811 EU regulations, growing at 3,500 pa.) 10. The EU costs us £200 billion pa, 20% of our economy According to the government's Better Regulation Task Force, complying with EU regulations now costs our economy over £100 billion a year. Economists say we lose £80 billion pa by associating with the EU's inferior economies. The EU took our fishing industry, which costs us £5 billion pa. EU damage to other industries a further £20 billion. Our EU contribution is £10 billion. Taxes have doubled in real terms since we've been in the EU, leaving little money left for a growing underclass struggling to make ends meet. 11. Our counties to be abolished The Queen signed the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, which adopts the EU Regionalisation Plan. This will abolish England's 48 counties and replace them with 9 European regions, each with their own Regional Capital, which reports directly to Brussels, not to Westminster. This effectively eliminates the country of England. 12. The EU's dispossession of the English. The 1997 Amsterdam Treaty gave the EU control of our immigration; they've increased it ten fold, overcrowding our cities and putting millions on minimum wage. With the seventh treaty abolishing our nation, then our counties, the EU ruling us from Brussels with the laws of a police state, and the English already at the bottom of every government, legal and politically correct queue, we will literally have no place we call home.
Views: 33383 Goodfightlads
Sources of the UK constitution - UK Constitutional Law
 
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The UK constitution is uncodified, which means it has a number of different sources. Here I will be outlining the 5 main sources of the UK constitution: Statute law Common law Conventions Authoritative Works The EU
Views: 233 Learning Academy
Codified vs Uncodified
 
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Edexcel Government & Politics Unit 2: Governing the UK Should the UK codify the constitution?
Views: 14982 Chepstow History
A.V. Dicey's interpretation of the Rule of Law - UK Constitutional Law
 
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In this video I will explore the theories of the prominent political theorist Dicey.
Views: 2624 Learning Academy
Brexit and the UK Constitution
 
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On Thursday 21st July, Brick Court Chambers hosted a panel discussion to consider the implications of Brexit for the UK constitution. Chaired by Clive Coleman, key issues under consideration included whether the referendum result was legally binding, the operation of Article 50 and the implications of Brexit for the UK and its devolved parliaments. Lord Falconer of Thornton opened by observing that although the referendum result was only advisory as a matter of law, it was an effective instruction to the Government to start negotiating a British withdrawal from the EU. When the terms on which the UK would leave the EU become clear, the Government must decide whether further democratic endorsement of the UK’s position is required. The similarity between the terms obtained and the key aspects of the referendum debate (principally access to the single market, controlling immigration and ending EU budget contributions) should inform the Government’s decision in this regard. Dominic Grieve QC MP commented that the referendum result is a manifestation of a very severe breakdown in trust between the electorate and the political institutions. It will be a huge domestic challenge for the new Prime Minister to heal this division. On the European level, Mr Grieve QC suggested that the smooth running of Article 50 envisaged by its drafters is unlikely to happen in practice. He did, however, consider that the EU would not want the UK to leave in chaotic conditions on the expiry of the specified two year negotiating period. Professor Derrick Wyatt QC discussed the UK’s withdrawal negotiations with the EU. Suggesting that accountability and transparency must be ensured, he proposed oversight by both the House of Commons and House of Lords. He also stressed that wide consultation is necessary to shape the UK’s position in the negotiations. Such steps would help to gain important cross-party support for the position reached. Professor Jo Shaw raised some of the issues faced by Scotland and Northern Ireland on the UK’s exit from the EU. In respect of Northern Ireland, she suggested that the real issue may not be secession but rather the reunification of Ireland. Northern Ireland trades a great deal with the Republic of Ireland, and also has concerns about cross-border policing and the European Arrest Warrant. Turning to Scotland, Professor Shaw noted the discussion of a ‘reverse Greenland’ situation, in which the UK would remain an EU Member State but the territorial scope of the EU treaties would be restricted. She also suggested that the situation in Cyprus could prove instructive. Finally, Richard Gordon QC considered what the UK’s next steps might and should be. Separating prediction from principle, he suggested that political and constitutional considerations will trump legal arguments. Further, the ultimate political need for the referendum result to be implemented will take precedence over any strict constitutional requirement for Parliament to trigger the Article 50 procedure. In his view, Parliament cannot guarantee what politics must deliver. A lively Q&A session followed the presentations. Topics raised included the revocability of an Article 50 notice, the extent to which the Sewell Convention and Good Friday Agreement are obstacles to Brexit, the practical problems faced by the UK in negotiating a new relationship with Europe and the extent to which the UK can rely on EU trade agreements that it has independently ratified.
Views: 10581 Brick Court
Types of Constitution - UK Constitutional Law
 
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In this video I will be covering a number of different types of constitution.
Views: 133 Learning Academy
Constitutional Principles: The Rule of Law
 
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Do you understand why the rule of law is important for maintaining free society? The Bill of Rights Institute has created a short, engaging video for Bill of Rights Day on the constitutional principle of the rule of law. Exciting visuals from current events, an engaging historical narrative, brief scholar interviews, and memorable quotes will make this 8-minute video perfect for use on Bill of Rights Day, and every day! A short viewing guide is also available to guide you through the content.
05 The British constitution
 
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The British constitution
Views: 26 BSCCIE Ini
The Future of the British Constitution
 
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Date: Wednesday 21 January 2015 Time: 18:30-20:00 Venue: 32L.G.03 Speakers: Simon Hix, Tony Travers, Andrew Blick, Martin Loughlin Chair: Kate Jenkins The fallout from the Scottish referendum has been profound for the whole of the UK. The Smith Commission has proposed radical further devolution for Scottish taxes and powers, while there are demands to deliver ‘English votes for English laws’. William Hague, on behalf of the government, has put forward four options for possible reform. Any change to the British ‘constitution’ will be difficult because there is no settled starting-point. This panel will examine options for the future of the British constitution in 2015 and beyond
Constitutional Principle #2: Federalism
 
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Each video in this series covers one of the five key principles found in the Constitution: Representative Government, Federalism, Separation of Powers, Checks and Balances, and Individual Liberties. As you watch each video, take notes on the provided video guides available for download below. 1 -- Representative Government: http://tinyurl.com/knumzcb 2 -- Federalism: http://tinyurl.com/mmpsan6 3 -- Separation of Power: http://tinyurl.com/lkbmlre 4 -- Checks and Balances: http://tinyurl.com/n3tpd47 5 -- Individual Liberties: http://tinyurl.com/kk3mmxh
Views: 27367 The History Navigator
Crowdsourcing the UK Constitution – Why do we need one?
 
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Professor Conor Gearty, of the London School of Economics and Political Science, explains how Constitution UK is helping to shape the UK’s first written constitution. With English regions feeling neglected, the Scottish Independence saga, unrest over the disproportionate power of London and the confusion surrounding Europe, it’s clear that there is something seriously wrong with the current political situation.
Public Law: Parliamentary Sovereignty, LLB Study Weekend 2011
 
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Rob Jago provides a lecture on Public Law and parliamentary sovereignty at the 2011 University of London International Programmes LLB Study Weekend. To find out more about our undergraduate laws programmes visit: http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/llb
Views: 84526 University of London
The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/articles-of-confederation When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-bill-of-rights Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4401775 CrashCourse
The UK Executive (Introduction)
 
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LSE Political Blog: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/ UK Gov: https://www.gov.uk/ Recorded with https://screencast-o-matic.com
Views: 577 Bert Fegg
1 - Introduction to Public Law
 
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Every state in the world has a constitution, written or unwritten. But what is a constitution essentially? In the course, we provide the answer to this question and many more like it, all of them amalgamated in the study of what we call public or constitutional law. This course, therefore, will teach you public law and with it, will help you form a deep understanding and an informed interpretation of aspects such as the United Kingdom’s constitution from a legal standpoint. We start with the basics—the kind of constitution the UK has, which institution mainly has legislative authority, the structure of its government and the three main organs of the state: the sovereign Parliament, the executive together with the Crown and the independent judiciary. The role of the European Union and the devolved assemblies in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in this entire equation, is also considered together with our roles as citizens. Where can you find out more? Follow us on each of our social media platforms: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/swbil/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/swbil/ OR Visit our website: https://www.bsolpk.org/
What is a Constitution?
 
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Professor Conor Gearty, of the London School of Economics and Political Science talks to Dr Andrew Blick, Lecturer in Politics at King’s College London to find out what exactly is a constitution. What is the difference between a written constitution and an unwritten one? Professor Gearty and Dr Blick also discuss the history of the Magna Carta and it’s significance. Where do you fit in? Join the debate by visiting www.constitutionuk.com and share your ideas as we crowdsource a written UK constitution.
ब्रिटेन का संविधान-(भाग 1) Britain ka samvidhan/Constitution of   (paper 1st/political science)Hindi
 
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Constitution of the United Kingdom The United Kingdom does not have one specific constitutional document named as such. Instead, the so-called constitution of the United Kingdom, or British constitution, is a sum of laws and principles that make up the country's body politic. This is sometimes referred to as an "unwritten" or uncodified constitution.[1][2] The British constitution primarily draws from four sources: statute law (laws passed by the legislature), common law(laws established through court judgments),parliamentary conventions, and works of authority.[1] Similar to an entirely written constitution, this sum also concerns both the relationship between the individual and the state and the functioning of the legislature, the executive, and the judiciary. Since the Glorious Revolution of 1688, the concept of parliamentary sovereignty has been the bedrock of the British legislative constitution, that is, the statutes passed by Parliament are the supreme and final source of law in the UK.[3] It follows that Parliament can change the constitution simply by passing new statutes through Acts of Parliament.[4] There has been some debate about whether parliamentary sovereignty remained intact[5] in the light of the UK's membership in the European Union (EU), an argument that was used by proponents of leaving the EU in the 2016 referendum vote ("Brexit").[6] Another core constitutional principle, the rule of law, is a phrase that was popularized by legal scholar A. V. Dicey in his 1885 work, Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution, which is recognized as a work of authority on the constitution by the British Parliament. https://youtu.be/tZdBdM2RAMA https://youtu.be/dTlhKEi7BNo
Views: 54511 Study Lovers
Crowdsourcing a New UK Constitution
 
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Speaker(s): David Blunkett MP, Richard Gordon QC, Carol Harlow, Dr Lea Ypi Chair: Professor Conor Gearty Recorded on 8 October 2013 in Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building. The UK has no constitution written down in one document. Instead it has laws, conventions, practices, activities scattered all over the place that constitutional lawyers gather together and describe as the UK constitution. In a unique project, LSE's Institute of Public Affairs (IPA) and Department of Law are coming together with the LSE Public Policy Group and LSE Democratic Audit to pioneer the crowdsourcing of a new UK constitution to ask members of the public to participate in, advise on and eventually to draft a new UK constitution. Join an expert panel to have your say on what should be included and to create this important new document. David Blunkett is a British Labour Party politician and the Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside and Hillsborough, having represented Sheffield Brightside from 1987 to 2010. Richard Gordon is a barrister at Brick Court Chambers and is widely recognised as one of the leading silks in Constitutional Law, Administrative and Public Law, and Human Rights/Civil Liberties. Increasingly, he is recommended in judicial review for EU and Competition Law cases. Carol Harlow is emeritus professor of law at LSE. She is Queens Counsel (honoris causa) (1996); Fellow and Council Member of the British Academy (1999, 2004); Fellow of the London School of Economics (2005); Emeritus Member of Society of Legal Scholars (2005). She was awarded a Leverhulme Fellowship in 2002. Dr Lea Ypi is a Lecturer in Political Theory in the Government Department, London School of Economics, and Adjunct Professor in Philosophy at the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University.
Public Law - Parliamentary Sovereignty
 
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A video lecture on the subject of parliamentary sovereignty for UK law students.
Views: 26525 marcuscleaver
What Is a Constitutional Convention?
 
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What Is a Constitutional Convention? One of a series of nine short videos featuring Charlie Meadows, Founder of OC-PAC, answering common questions about constitutional conventions (aka Con-Cons, Article V conventions, or conventions for proposing amendments). To learn more and take action, go to: http://www.jbs.org/issues-pages/no-con-con
Views: 1992 TheJohnBirchSociety
Refining the UK Constitution
 
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Professor Gearty, Director, Institute of Public Affairs launches the refining stage of the Constitution UK’s project to crowdsource a UK constitution. Please visit www.constitutionuk.com to take part in the refining of the ideas.
Separation of Powers and Checks and Balances: Crash Course Government and Politics #3
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the US Governments Separation of powers and the system of checks and balances. In theory, the Legislative Branch, the Executive Branch, and the Judicial Brach are designed to keep each other in check, and to keep any branch from becoming too powerful. In reality, the system was designed to keep the president from becoming some kind of autocrat. For the most part, it has worked. Craig will call in the clones to explain which powers belong to which branches, and to reveal some secret perks that the Supreme Court justices enjoy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1655382 CrashCourse
The Monarch's Role in the Government of the UK   Video & Lesson Transcript  Study
 
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Uk Group in Baraem Alain Private School Header : Ali C o.Header : Sherif Member : Luay Member : Rashid
Views: 29224 Uk Group
Principles of Government in the US Constitution
 
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This is information that goes with Chapter 5 in our textbook.
Views: 148 Cyrille Kaufman
Separation of Powers
 
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Lecture on the separation of powers for students studying law in the UK. Next lecture on the rule of law: https://youtu.be/cXC5lUx0uAU
Views: 20592 marcuscleaver
Law Subject Extension: Constitutional Law: Part 2
 
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Dr Mark Elliott discusses the Belmarsh Prison case (http://www.bailii.org/uk/cases/UKHL/2004/56.html) - more formally known as A v Secretary of State for the Home Department - which was decided in 2004 by the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords (the forerunner of today's United Kingdom Supreme Court). In this second video, the judgment of the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords in the Belmarsh Prison case is considered. The issue for the House of Lords was whether Article 15 of the European Convention on Human Rights (http://www.echr.coe.int/NR/rdonlyres/D5CC24A7-DC13-4318-B457-5C9014916D7A/0/Convention_ENG.pdf) could be invoked so as to (in effect) suspend the right to liberty normally granted by Article 5 of the Convention, thereby avoiding any clash between that right and the Government's powers under Part 4 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2001/24/part/4/enacted) to detain certain foreign terror suspects. The House of Lords had to confront two key questions: whether there was a "public emergency threatening the life of the nation", and, if so, whether indefinite detention of foreign suspects was a necessary and lawful response to it. While eight of the nine judges in the House of Lords acknowledged that there were a public emergency, a clear majority refused to accept that the steps taken in response to it had been shown to be necessary. There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/a_BOYxQtZLs - Part 2: https://youtu.be/H6lCiMeworc - Part 3: https://youtu.be/lQNPuXtI_i0 A document supporting this video is available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/constitutional-law-subject-extension-material-2.pdf
Views: 8367 Cambridge Law Faculty
Political and Constitutional Reform Select Committee - UK Constitution
 
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Graham Allen MP on mapping the path to codifying - or not codifying - the UK's Constitution. To find out more please visit: http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/political-and-constitutional-reform-committee/news/report-a-new-magna-carta/
Views: 5502 UK Parliament
The constitution
 
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Constitution of the United Kingdom From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia "British Constitution" redirects here. For the card game, see British Constitution (solitaire). United Kingdom Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg This article is part of a series on the politics and government of the United Kingdom Constitution[show] The Crown[show] Executive[show] Legislature[show] Judiciary[show] Devolution[show] Administrative geography[show] Elections[show] Foreign policy[show] Portal icon United Kingdom portal Other countries Atlas Portal icon Politics portal v t e The constitution of the United Kingdom is the sum of laws and principles that make up the body politic of the United Kingdom. It concerns both the relationship between the individual and the state, and the functioning of the legislature, the executive and judiciary. Unlike many other nations, the UK has no single constitutional document. This is sometimes expressed by stating that it has an uncodified or "unwritten" constitution.[1] Much of the British constitution is embodied in written documents, within statutes, court judgments, works of authority and treaties. The constitution has other unwritten sources, including parliamentary constitutional conventions.[2] After the Glorious Revolution in 1688, the bedrock of the legislative British constitution has been described as the doctrine of parliamentary sovereignty, according to which the statutes passed by Parliament are the UK's supreme and final source of law.[3] It follows that Parliament can change the constitution simply by passing new Acts of Parliament.[4] A court within a case has however, stated obiter (making it clear that they were not purporting to make a binding position) that it was content to assume that the following proposition was correct: ‘that Parliament can effectively tie the hands of its successors, if it passes a statute which provides that any future legislation on a specified subject shall be enacted only with certain specified consents’.[5][6][7] There is some debate about whether the principle of parliamentary sovereignty remains valid,[8] particularly in light of the UK's membership in the European Union.[9] Another core principle of the British constitution, as enunciated by the legal scholar Albert Venn Dicey, is the rule of law.
ConstitutionUK: Crowdsourcing the UK's constitution
 
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The UK has no constitution written down in one document. Instead, it has laws, conventions, practices, and activities scattered all over the place that constitutional lawyers gather together and describe as the UK constitution. In a unique project, LSE's IPA and Department of Law are coming together with the LSE Public Policy Group and Democratic Audit to pioneer the crowdsourcing of a new UK constitution, asking members of the public to participate in, advise on, and eventually to draft a new UK constitution. Contributor: Professor Conor Gearty
Foundations of UK Administrative Law: The Common Law Method, Values and Contestation
 
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The Hamlyn Lectures 2014 - Professor Paul Craig, Faculty of Law and St John's College, University of Oxford
Views: 15865 Oxford Law Faculty
Inaugural Lecture: Professor Jeff King (UCL) - The Democratic Case for a Written Constitution
 
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The United Kingdom is one of three countries in the world without a written constitution. Many argue that a written and entrenched constitution is required in order to safeguard rights against majoritarian overreach. In this lecture, the speaker rather argues that a written constitution is required to fully achieve democratic self-government. Only through the adoption of a written constitution can the people exercise true authorship over the most fundamental rules of the polity. The issue of codification is hardly new, and there are several arguments against such a reform. Some think it a bid to entrench elite interests of the liberal variety. Others take it to be rationalist folly in a constitution whose history proves the wisdom of incrementalism in public affairs. Most critics think it will judicialise political disputes. And right-minded people everywhere should fear the ossification that attends strict constitutional amendment procedures. But the democratic case for a written constitution survives all these concerns. Some of the objections are simply misguided, while others can be accommodated by sound process and substance. None come close to refuting the potent democratic case for a right to political self-authorship. The speaker will illustrate these claims through a consideration of the theory and practice of constitutionalism, and an examination of recent developments in UK public law, and in the politics of Brexit, devolution and parliamentary reform.
Views: 1549 UCL LAWS

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