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Torpedo Gannet Diving! | Nature's Great Events w/ David Attenborough | BBC
 
02:15
In summer, the gannet's main food source of sardines live far out to sea. This means the birds must dive for their food, but even one small miscalculation could prove fatal. Subscribe to BBC Earth: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSubBBC Earth YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCEarth BBC Earth Facebook http://www.facebook.com/bbcearth (ex-UK only) BBC Earth Twitter http://www.twitter.com/bbcearth Visit http://www.bbc.com/earth/world for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos This is a channel from BBC Studios who help fund new BBC programmes.
Views: 100095 BBC Earth
Diving birds Pelicans bombing for fish! Nice Pelican pictures!
 
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Diving birds! Pelicans bombing for fish! Nice Pelican pictures! Pelican diving for fish is something! When two pelicans diving for fish it looks exceptionally beautiful! Pelicans are a genus of large water birds comprising the family Pelecanidae. They are characterized by a long beak and large throat pouch used in catching prey and draining water from the scooped up contents before swallowing. They have predominantly pale plumage, the exceptions being the Brown and Peruvian Pelicans. The bills, pouches and bare facial skin of all species become brightly colored before the breeding season. The eight living pelican species have a patchy global distribution, ranging latitudinaly from the tropics to the temperate zone, though they are absent from interior South America as well as from polar regions and the open ocean. Fossil evidence of pelicans dates back at least 30 million years, to the remains of a beak very similar to that of modern species recovered from Oligocene strata in France. Long thought to be related to frigate birds, cormorants, tropic birds, gannets and boobies, pelicans are now known instead to be most closely related to the Shoebill and Hamerkop, and are placed in the order Pelican forms. Ibises, spoonbills and herons are more distant relatives, and have been classified in the same order. Pelicans frequent inland and coastal waters where they feed principally on fish, catching them at or near the water surface. Gregarious birds, they often hunt cooperatively and breed colonially. Four white-plumage species tend to nest on the ground, and four brown or grey-plumage species nest mainly in trees. The relationship between pelicans and people has often been contentious. The birds have been persecuted because of their perceived competition with commercial and recreational fishers. They have suffered from habitat destruction, disturbance and environmental pollution, and three species are of conservation concern. They also have a long history of cultural significance in mythology, and in Christian and heraldic iconography.
Views: 37679 AB Video Stories
Red Sea Diving Adventure! | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this exciting episode of Blue World, Jonathan, Todd and Bill travel all the way to Egypt to dive the Red Sea, visit the pyramids and ride some camels! Along the way they meet dolphins, sea turtles, sharks and dive some of the most colorful reefs in the world! JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure series featuring underwater cinematographer/naturalist Jonathan Bird. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 76608 BlueWorldTV
Red Sea Night Dive! | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this dark and spooky episode, Jonathan goes night diving in the Red Sea to find an octopus on the prowl, and a moray eel hunting fish, as well as many other strange and exotic nocturnal animals! JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure series featuring underwater cinematographer/naturalist Jonathan Bird. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 235169 BlueWorldTV
Night Diving! | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this exciting episode of Jonathan Bird's Blue World, Jonathan explains why night diving is so much fun and so popular with scuba divers. Far from being scary, it's actually an amazing experience to see the kind of nocturnal animals that come out of hiding at night. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 176758 BlueWorldTV
Helmet Diving | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Jonathan explores the history of diving by heading down to New Jersey to meet up with the Garden State Underwater Recovery Unit to try diving in a vintage Mark V helmet! It's a completely new experience! JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 1064593 BlueWorldTV
Bull Sharks | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Jonathan travels to Mexico for an up close encounter with Bull sharks, infamous for the fact that they are known to be the most dangerous species of shark to humans. He gets to try a chain mail anti-shark suit, and meets a biologist who is studying the sharks to learn more about their population and habits. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Or Twitter! https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV On the Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 19611381 BlueWorldTV
Watch a Diving Bird Pluck a Suckerfish Off a Shark | Nat Geo Wild
 
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Divers off Cabo San Lucas, Mexico captured the only known footage showing a bird called a cormorant pulling remoras, or suckerfish, off a whale shark. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoWILDSubscribe About National Geographic Wild: National Geographic Wild is a place for all things animals and for animal-lovers alike. Take a journey through the animal kingdom with us and discover things you never knew before, or rediscover your favorite animals! Get More National Geographic Wild: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoWILD Facebook: http://bit.ly/NGWFacebook Twitter: http://bit.ly/NGWTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NGWInstagram Off the tip of Mexico's Baja California Peninsula, divers were surprised by a rare sight: a cormorant bird diving into the water and plucking a remora off the side of a whale shark. Cormorants always feed by diving for fish, but apparently, no one had ever filmed the birds fishing this way. The footage, filmed about six years ago, resurfaced recently online. Experts can't say if it’s a novel behavior or just something that hadn’t been recorded. Remoras, or suckerfish, attach themselves to large hosts, living off scraps. In small numbers, remoras are harmless to whale sharks—maybe even beneficial, removing pests. But lots of remoras could be a problem—slowing the shark down, costing energy gained by filter feeding. If a cormorant lightens the whale shark's load, it might be providing a service. Read "Bold Little Bird Dive-Bombs the World’s Largest Fish" https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/02/whale-shark-cormorant-bird-cleaning-suckerfish-remora-animals/ Watch a Diving Bird Pluck a Suckerfish Off a Shark | Nat Geo Wild https://youtu.be/36-2AfSwRbE Nat Geo Wild https://www.youtube.com/user/NatGeoWild
Views: 41004 Nat Geo WILD
Georgia Aquarium (HD) | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Jonathan visits the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta—the largest aquarium in the world—where they keep not one but four whale sharks in captivity, as well as two manta rays. Whale sharks are the largest fish on Earth and Jonathan learns how these animals are maintained in captivity while he dives with them in a 6 million gallon fish tank! This segment was originally uploaded in 2012. This is a new version in HD. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** The Georgia Aquarium is one of the world’s most spectacular. It houses exhibits ranging from coral reefs to kelp forests, salt water to fresh water, warm water to cold water, and just about everything in between. But there is no doubt that the 6.3 million gallon Ocean Voyager exhibit is the most impressive part of the Georgia Aquarium There is also a tunnel through the Ocean Voyager so people can walk underneath the marine life, which includes some of nature’s most magnificent animals like manta rays and whale sharks. Keeping manta rays and whale sharks in captivity is difficult. First of all, these are huge animals! Mantas grow larger than a car, and whale sharks larger than a bus! So they need a lot of space. But they pose another interesting challenge as well—both are filter feeders. In the wild they strain their planktonic food by swimming with an open mouth and capturing small animals from the water on their gill rakers. In an aquarium, there is no plankton. Aquarists had to train the animals for hand feeding. To learn how they feed the mantas, I make my way to the top of the Ocean Voyager exhibit, a nearly football field-sized fish tank! The mantas are fed a combination of krill and small fish from a ladle. Since the mantas can’t swim in place, they have to be fed while they swim by gently ladling the food out in front of their mouths. While I get the bird’s eye view of the feeding from above, the aquarium visitors get the fish eye view from below in the tunnel with the sharks feeding directly overhead. It all started in Taiwan, where whale sharks are hunted for food. The Georgia Aquarium teamed up with a local fisherman to capture a live whale shark. Once they had it in a pen, they transferred it to a specially-made sling. Then it was transferred into a custom tank with life support for an overseas flight. Finally the shark was flown on a private charter across the Pacific all the way to Atlanta, where it was driven to the aquarium. It’s quite a journey for a shark! Given how expensive and difficult it is to get whale sharks all the way to the Georgia Aquarium, the staff isn’t taking any chances when it comes to their care. The rooms where food is prepared are nearly as clean as operating rooms. And I’m about ready to try diving in this inland ocean, so I head upstairs for my briefing with divemaster Devon Fleming. While I go and get my gear on, they put the dock into the water. They don’t leave it in all the time because the animals might injure themselves on it. Before I even have my camera, a whale shark swims silently right below the dock. It’s hard to believe I’m in a giant fish tank with a whale shark! On the bottom, a Great Hammerhead comes over to check me out! I follow Devon down towards the deep end of the exhibit, and Tallulah the manta ray swims over to say hello. A whale shark, with a school of jacks keeping him company swims over me. The whale sharks move around the huge tank in circles and figure eights. They are used to the divers and don’t mind us at all. There is so much marine life in this exhibit that sometimes I forget I’m doing a dive in an aquarium. My camera moves from whale shark, to Great Hammerhead. Then on to Nandi, the other manta ray, doing barrel rolls. Then back to another hammerhead. On the bottom, a sawfish catches my attention. This is a kind of ray with a saw-like nose for hunting prey. I have never even seen one of these in the wild but they have nearly a dozen of them in this exhibit. One of Aquarium staff divers peacefully enjoys a sand tiger shark lazily drifting by. In spite of their fierce-looking teeth, these sharks are no threat to people. They eat smaller prey. Soon my dive nears the end. On our way back to the shallow end of the exhibit, I pass once again over the tunnel with the people looking up. And Tallulah buzzes by again as if to bid me farewell. Devon gives me the signal to head to the surface. It was such a short dive…I don’t know if I can bring myself to getting out of the water.
Views: 907381 BlueWorldTV
Underwater Diving Bird | National Geographic
 
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Meet a bird that can "fly" underwater. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Underwater Diving Bird | National Geographic https://youtu.be/6ERPmoYsoMg National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 224467 National Geographic
Sea Turtles (HD) | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In Malaysia there is an island known for more sea turtles than virtually anywhere on Earth. Jonathan visits this amazing ecosystem to learn about the life cycle of sea turtles. He is surprised to discover an amazingly complex and competitive environment. This is an HD upload of a previously released segment. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** We head out towards the reefs of Sipadan island. This island is so small that you can walk all the way around it on the beach in an hour. Yet, it has a huge population of sea turtles. As the school of fish swims away, I spot my first sea turtle—a Green sea turtle swimming over the reef. It wasn’t hard because they’re everywhere. Some are swimming around, while others are napping on and in the reef. Sea turtles actually sleep underwater while holding their breath. A sea turtle can easily hold its breath over an hour! A few hundred feet away, I find a Hawksbill sea turtle munching on the reef. She is plucking out tasty sponges and invertebrates that hide in the coral, rather than eat the coral itself. It takes a tough stomach to digest this stuff. As we circle the island, I can see the tracks left in the sand by females that have climbed the beach to lay their eggs. It all starts when a male, identified by his long tail, catches up with a cooperative female and courts her. From the surface, I see the action and I prepare to film it. The mating has begun, and I quietly approach to film the action. Mating is not easy for the female sea turtle. She must swim—and rise to breathe—for both of them. The male's long tail holds the female and fertilizes the eggs, while claws on his front flippers give him the ability to grasp the female's shell. The commotion doesn't go unnoticed by other males in the area. They flock to the mating pair, which have drifted away from the reef. Eventually, no less than four additional male turtles arrive to challenge the suitor. They all try the same techniques and it is starting to wear him down. Meanwhile the female is near exhaustion. The male is only struggling to hold on….the female is struggling to survive. Hours later, the male has outlasted his rivals. He fertilizes the female's eggs and with luck his genes will continue on. As if her job weren't hard enough already, the female now faces another tremendous task--to lay the eggs—but it must wait until nightfall. After the sun sets, I head to the beach in total darkness. The females come ashore and lay their eggs in the sand. I have found a turtle hauling herself out of the water, painstakingly clawing her way up the beach to high ground. Although sea turtles live their entire lives in the ocean, they lay their eggs in a nest on the beach. After the sea turtle reaches an area well above the high tide line, she begins to throw sand around to create a pit. She's out of her element and vulnerable. The slightest sound or light would frighten her back into the water. She must stop frequently to catch her breath. Her crushing weight on land literally asphyxiates her. She begins to dig a hole about 3 feet deep with her rear flippers. The hole doesn't just protect the eggs from predators. The sex of the baby turtles is a function of the incubation temperature. A shallow nest baking in the sun will be too warm and all the babies will be female. A deep one will be too cold and the babies will all be male. Digging to the right depth insures a good mix of males and females. At last she begins to lay as many as 100 squishy eggs about the size of ping pong balls into the nest. In 2 months, these eggs will hatch and the baby turtles will emerge. After she has finished laying her eggs, she carefully fills in the hole. Then she cleverly disguises the exact location of the nest by flinging some sand around. After two hours of effort, she plods her way laboriously back to the sea, completely exhausted. Two months later, newly hatched sea turtles race to the sea. Each baby turtle must rush past a gauntlet of predators from land, sky and sea to reach the open ocean. Odds are, only one of these baby sea turtles will survive. On their journey, the sea turtles must fight their way through the surf, swim across the shallows and then make their way to the open ocean, away from predators on the reef. They won’t return to their home on the reef until they are large enough to be safe—about the size of a dinner plate. It’s a long and perilous journey but if this sea turtle survives, it may go on to live over a hundred years.
Views: 419425 BlueWorldTV
Wunderpus Octopus Quest! | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Jonathan heads to Dumaguete in the Philippines on a muck diving mission to look for one of the rarest and most spectacular octopuses in the world--the Wonderpus! Along the way he discovers a number of amazing animals that thrive in the "muck" (sand) habitat. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure series featuring underwater cinematographer/naturalist Jonathan Bird. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 188969 BlueWorldTV
BTO Bird ID - Diving Ducks
 
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Dabbling ducks are so familiar, but there is also a group of common ducks that actively dive on freshwater for food. One or other is likely to be encountered on still or moving freshwater or even at sea so let this workshop help you to decide which diving duck you are seeing. BirdFacts for these species - Tufted Duck - http://app.bto.org/birdfacts/results/bob2030.htm Pochard - http://app.bto.org/birdfacts/results/bob1980.htm Scaup - http://app.bto.org/birdfacts/results/bob2040.htm
Views: 30880 BTOvideo
Diving the Great Barrier Reef | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Jonathan visits the largest reef system in the world: the famous Great Barrier Reef of Australia. In addition to going diving, he visits the reef as non-divers often do—by submarine, helicopter and even in a bubble helmet! Along the way he meets some amazing animals such as a friendly sea turtle and a giant wrasse! This is an HD upload of a previously released season 3 segment. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** The Great Barrier Reef. It's probably the most famous reef in the world, and the largest. It's not just visible from the air, but from space. Cairns is a city in Queensland, the northeast state of Australia. The Great Barrier Reef runs 1600 miles along the coast of Queensland. Its made up of millions of interconnected coral heads, forming the largest living structure made by living organisms! To see the whole thing, you need to get pretty high up. This satellite image was made from 400 feet above the ocean. You can see the reef just offshore. For my first encounter on the Great Barrier Reef, I'll be making the trip out on a big catamaran operated by Sunlover Cruises. The crew unties the boat and I enjoy the scenery as we head offshore. Ninety minutes later, I arrive at the Sunlover pontoon. I have never seen a dive operation like this before. The boat is huge, but we don't dive from the boat. Instead we dock at this massive pontoon—sort of like a floating dive shop—and spend the day right next to the reef in a protected spot. Pure luxury! A lot of people who don't dive love to come out and get a first hand look at the reef here. The water is clear and it's not too deep. But even people who don't like to get wet can see the reef. On a submarine! And for a diving experience unlike any other, anyone can try the Sea Walker experience. All you need is a 40 found helmet! I walk down the stairs into the water and the staff outfits me with the strangest piece of dive gear I have ever used. With no fins on, I just walk out to a massive school of fish. My hair doesn't even get wet! This is incredible! They’ve got about a thousand fish around here. I feel like Doctor Sylvia Earle – deep sea diver. This is a very different way to go scuba diving, and this just goes to show you if you don’t want to wear a mask, don’t want to wear a regulator, and maybe you can’t even swim that well, you can do this! It’s just like walking. You know I’ve had a lot of experiences underwater, and this is definitely one of the most unique! To demonstrate how this helmet works, I have an ordinary water glass, which obviously is full of water, but if I turn it upside down, I can fill it with air. (Fills it with air) And now you can see that it keeps the air in, but if you turn it right side up – so we don’t want to turn this right side up. I pose for a picture, because you never know when you're going to get to do this again! Next I meet Vance Fahey who will be my divemaster for a scuba dive on the reef today. Not only do I have a nice easy staircase to walk right down into the water, but a platform for putting on my fins. I can get used to this! On the platform is a group of new divers getting their first taste of the underwater world. At last I head out onto the reef to explore. I see many types of hard corals, beautiful pastel colored soft corals, and lots of fan coral. Near the reef, I find one of the largest Giant Clams I have ever seen. I can't imagine how much this clam must weigh. The mantle gets its bright colors from imbedded symbiotic algae that harvest the sun's rays for energy. I find a huge crack in the reef and have a little fun swimming through it. On the other end, I'm greeted by a sea turtle. She comes right over. There are lots of divers around this reef and this turtle knows that the divers won't hurt her. Once she has decided that I'm not doing anything terribly interesting, she goes back to looking for her favorite sponges to eat. I turn and head back towards the platform across the shallow reef. At the platform I'm greeted by a friendly Mauri Wrasse. This monster of a fish reaches both the length and the weight of a motorcycle. I'm just glad they prefer to eat crustaceans and mollusks--not divers! I think I've made a new friend!
Views: 1388106 BlueWorldTV
Deep Cocos Island | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this exciting Blue World adventure, Jonathan Bird hitches a ride on a submarine down to 1,000 feet at Cocos Island, Costa Rica, where he finds strange fish and even sharks! ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Or Twitter! https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV On the Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 903330 BlueWorldTV
Swarm of Birds Dive into Water | Mine, MINE
 
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This swarm of birds follows a school of fish underwater and each of the birds dives into the water for a catch! Original Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kI4j1edfSSY SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/JukinSubscriber WHAT TO WATCH NEXT: Amazing Bird Swarm: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31dRmsc2HZU Blackbird Confronts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtS3bCuDuxk LIKE us on FACEBOOK http://facebook.com/JukinVideo FOLLOW us on TWITTER http://twitter.com/JukinVideo FOLLOW us on INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/JukinVideo TO LICENSE THIS CLIP, GO TO: licensing (at) jukinvideo.com
Views: 132724 JukinVideo
BTO Bird ID - Winter Divers
 
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Divers in winter can be confusing and difficult to identify. Let this video help you to confidently separate Red-throated, Black-throated and Great Northern Divers.
Views: 17999 BTOvideo
Bonaire Coral Farm | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Jonathan and his family volunteer to help on a farm--an underwater farm!! On Bonaire, the Coral Restoration Foundation is growing coral to replenish damaged reefs, but it's a labor-intensive project that takes volunteer help. It turns out the kids are really good coral farmers! JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure series featuring underwater cinematographer/naturalist Jonathan Bird. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 46035 BlueWorldTV
How Do Pelicans Survive Their Death-Defying Dives? | Deep Look
 
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Brown pelicans hit the water at breakneck speed when they catch fish. Performing such dangerous plunges requires technique, equipment, and 30 million years of practice. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * California’s brown pelicans are one of two pelican species (once considered the same) that plunge from the air to hunt. The rest, like the white pelican, bob for fish at the water’s surface. The shape of its bill is essential to the birds' survival in these dives, reducing “hydrodynamic drag” — buckling forces, caused by the change from air to water — to almost zero. It’s something like the difference between slapping the water with your palm and chopping it, karate-style. And while all birds have light, air-filled bones, pelican skeletons take it to an extreme. As they dive, they inflate special air sacs around their neck and belly, cushioning their impact and allowing them to float. Even their celebrated pouches play a role. An old limerick quips, “A remarkable bird is a pelican / Its beak can hold more than its belly can…” That beak is more than just a fishing net. It’s also a parachute that pops open underwater, helping to slow the bird down. Behind the pelican’s remarkable resilience (and beaks) lies 30 million years of evolutionary stasis, meaning they haven’t changed much over time. --- What do pelicans eat? Pelicans eat small fish like anchovies, sardines, and smelt. --- How long to pelicans live? Pelicans live 15-25 years in the wild. --- How big are pelicans? Brown pelicans are small for pelicans, but still big for birds, with a 6-8 foot wingspan. Their average weight is 3.5 kg. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/04/25/volunteer-brown-pelican-count-aims-to-measure-recovery-of-once-endangered-birds/ ---+ For more information: U.S. Fish and Wildlife brown pelican page https://ecos.fws.gov/ecp0/profile/speciesProfile?spcode=B02L ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zxqg_um1TXI How Do Sharks and Rays Use Electricity to Find Hidden Prey? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDPFR6n8tAQ ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Physics Girl: Why Outlets Spark When Unplugging https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1Ld8D2bnJM Gross Science: Everything You Didn’t Want to Know About Snot https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shEPwQPQG4I ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook
Views: 1004233 Deep Look
Ichetucknee Spring Cave Dive | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this underground adventure, Jonathan and Cameraman Zach head back to "Jug Hole" at Ichetucknee Springs State Park in Florida to crawl through the bedding plane and the diamond sands restriction to look for fossils. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure series featuring underwater cinematographer/naturalist Jonathan Bird. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 116418 BlueWorldTV
Diving Silfra Iceland | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this exciting Blue World adventure, Jonathan travels up to Iceland in search of a dive site called Silfra which supposedly has the clearest water in the world! But it's cold! ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** Temperate water is rarely very clear. We consider ourselves lucky to get 30 feet of visibility in New England. Sometimes it’s not even that good—more like 10 feet. You can barely see anything until you are right on top of it. Plankton makes this water extremely fertile, but you can’t see through it very well. In the tropics, water has less plankton and it’s often quite a bit clearer. It’s not unusual to have 100 feet, sometimes even 150 feet of visibility in the tropics. At the massive Neutral Buoyancy Lab in Houston—a huge indoor swimming pool where astronauts are trained—I have experienced visibility of at least 400 feet. The water is so clear, it’s like it’s not there at all. But this is a pool. The water is filtered and chlorinated. Is there anyplace in the world with naturally-occurring clarity like this? Iceland is right smack-dab in the middle of the mid-Atlantic ridge, where two large tectonic plates meet. Lava coming out from between these plates at a hot spot created Iceland about 20 million years ago. But since those tectonic plates are still moving, Iceland has cracks down the middle and occasional earthquakes as a result. Silfra is one of those cracks. It has filled with spring water that percolates up through the ground from distant glaciers. So it’s cold and it’s clear. Iceland itself is a beautiful and sparsely populated country full of natural wonders. It has huge glaciers. And those glaciers give birth to icebergs which float away into the North Atlantic ocean. But even though it’s called Iceland, it’s not all ice by any means. At least in the summer. There aren’t many trees, but the landscape features rolling green grassy hills. There are grazing sheep. And lots of farms. Summer meltwater feeds scores of rivers and streams. Some are crystal clear, others are filled with minerals making them milky white. And there are waterfalls. I mean a lot of awesome waterfalls! This is Gulfoss, one of Iceland’s largest. Until recently, the only divers who came here were animals. But Silfra has changed all that. Divers now come from around the world to experience the amazing visibility in this tiny dive site just a few meters wide and a few hundred meters long. They say this is the clearest water in the world. Let’s go find out! My adventure begins in downtown Reykjavic, Iceland’s capital city. Diving here is not without difficulty. I’ll need a dry suit to stay warm in the water which is barely above freezing. Since most people don’t go to Iceland specifically to dive, they often don’t bring any gear. Dive Iceland supplies everything you need, even the dry suit. Our team has decided to try their gear, for the full experience. So we’re all getting into drysuits we’ve never worn before. After we have our suits on, I have to carry my camera all the way from the parking area to the entry point. Jose hands me my camera and I sink down into clear, cold water. Under the surface, there is nothing to see but bare rock—and crystal clear water. My first view under the surface blows my mind—I can see all the way down to the end of the crack where it takes a turn! I have no idea how far that is. Once everyone is ready, we submerge. Then Jose leads the way downstream. There’s a gentle current in Silfra from the spring opening all the way down to a lake. The incredible visibility is no exaggeration! This is the clearest water I have ever seen in sunlight. The straight sections of Silfra aren’t even long enough to test the full visibility, but it’s easily many hundreds of feet. We swim for a few minutes through a narrow crack, which is at least 50 feet deep. There’s nothing to see down there, so we stay pretty shallow where the marginal morning light is a little better. In this shallow water, strands of green algae thrive on the ample summer sunlight. After passing through the shallow section, we head into another deep crack. Now that the initial excitement has worn off, I’m noticing the water temperature, which is only 36° Fahrenheit, barely above freezing. My face is completely numb. This water is nearly as cold as the water in Antarctica! It might look tropical because of that blue color seen in very clear water, but I’m definitely not in the Bahamas.
Views: 357262 BlueWorldTV
Diving Antarctica! | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this season 2 finale, Jonathan treks all the way to Antarctica to investigate life south of the polar circle. Along the way he dives in the majestic kelp forests of Patagonia, where crabs rule the sea floor. Once he arrives in Antarctica, his adventures continue. He swims with penguins, dives under an iceberg, meets a massive jellyfish 3 feet across, and has an incredible encounter with a Leopard seal, the apex predator of Antarctica. This program won a New England Emmy Award! ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** My journey begins with several flights from my home in the United States to the southernmost city in the world—Ushuaia, Argentina at the tip of Tierra del Fuego. My home away from home: the Aleksey Marychev, a 210 foot long Russian research vessel with an ice-strengthened hull. On our way down the Beagle Channel to open water, we pass a small rock island covered in South American Sea Lions. And then we pass the famous Beagle Channel Lighthouse. After leaving the Beagle Channel, we will round Cape Horn into the Drake Passage and make our way more than 600 miles south until we reach the protection afforded by end of the Antarctic peninsula. My first glimpse of the underwater terrain reveals mostly just some seaweed on the bottom, flowing gently in the current. But a closer look reveals a community of bottom-dwelling invertebrates, including vast armies of limpets, snail-like animals with cone-shaped shells. They eat the algae on the rocks. A bright red sea star hunts down limpets for lunch. Nearby, Anemones wait for prey, their stinging tentacles armed and ready for an unwary fish. A sea cucumber uses feathery, branching arms to grab plankton out of the water to eat. It’s a Gentoo penguin, swimming around with the grace of a dolphin and the speed of a torpedo! These birds might not be able to fly, but underwater they sure can swim. Their wings are adapted for providing underwater propulsion, and few animals in the ocean can swim with such grace and speed as a penguin. A Gentoo Penguin is easy to identify because of its bright red beak. Many of these Gentoos are barely more than chicks, waiting patiently for their downy baby feathers to fall off. These poofy feathers keep them warm when they are little, but they’re not good for swimming. As the birds get older and their adult feathers grow in, they start gathering down by the ocean. Soon, they take short hops into the freezing water to hunt in the shallows for krill and small invertebrates. Penguins on the move porpoise in and out of the water like dolphins—but then they can hop right back up on land like no dolphin I’ve ever seen! As I rise toward the surface at the end of my dive, I encounter a huge wall of ice. It’s an iceberg, that drifted into the bay. The wall of the iceberg is covered in dimples, like the ones on a golf ball. This pattern forms as the iceberg melts. Thousands of tiny bubbles are released from the melting ice as well, making the water near the iceberg look like a fizzy drink! The iceberg only rises a few feet above the surface, but its more than thirty feet deep. When you see an iceberg floating by, there’s not that much above water sometimes, but that’s because 90% of an iceberg is underwater. If I flip it over, you can see just how much ice there is. That’s why icebergs are really dangerous to ships, because you can’t see the part that’s hidden underwater. Fun with ice! I carry my camera down to the boat and we’re off. Today we’re hunting quietly for a very special animal. And sure enough, we found them. Leopard seals sleeping on an iceberg. These animals which reach 12 feet long, are the apex predators of the Antarctic. There are no sharks in the waters of Antarctica, but these seals fill that niche in the food chain. Soon, the Leopard seals wake from their nap and come over to investigate us. They have been known to bite and deflate Zodiacs when they are being territorial. The seal makes a few passes to check me out, but he seems a lot more curious than aggressive. Divers are not very common down here. This Leopard seal has probably never seen a diver, or a video camera before. Either he sees his reflection in the lens, or he’s looking for a career in show business. Either way, this animal sure doesn’t seem to mind my presence. The leopard seal is so curious, that he stays around for more than an hour. I even have enough time to get my still camera and take a few pictures.
Views: 1721739 BlueWorldTV
Mayan Underworld | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
21:52
In this spooky underwater adventure, Jonathan travels to Merida, in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, to explore cenotes that were used by pre-Columbian Mayans for human sacrifices. Reaching the cenotes requires rappelling down into the Earth and lowering all the gear. The underwater exploration requires advanced cave diving techniques and the cinematography in this environment is extremely challenging, particularly the lighting. This beautifully shot adventure will leave viewers on the edge of their seats! Warning: this segment contains graphic images of human bones. Thanks to Jeff Shaw and Freedom Divers, Merida. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** 66 million years ago, an enormous asteroid tumbled through space. Travelling ten times the speed of a rifle bullet, this celestial missile was on a direct collision course with Earth. It smashed into Earth with such force that it triggered powerful earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The impact threw a cloud of dust into the atmosphere, cooling the planet and killing the dinosaurs. The impact crater is located just north of the Yucatan peninsula, in what is now Mexico. Around the outer ring of the crater, cracks formed in the limestone, allowing groundwater to flow through, eroding into caves. When a cave ceiling gets too thin and falls in, you get what is known as a cenote. The word cenote was derived from the Mayan word ts’onot meaning “sacred well”--A source of water, and an entrance to the caves. Fast forward to 2,000 years ago, the Maya civilization dominated central America. They built their cities near the cenotes so they had access to fresh water from what are essentially super clean underground rivers. Thanks to that asteroid, there are more cenotes in this area than anyplace else in the world--thousands of them running along the rim of the ancient crater. It’s an incredible place for some underwater exploration! At last we reach cenote Sha-An and the guides start setting up. Looking inside the cenote, I can tell you this, I would not want to fall in there by accident. The surface of the water is 50 feet down and the only way out would be climbing a tree root! But it’s absolutely breathtaking. I lead the way into a gorgeous passageway that almost looks like a miniature riverbed, with pebbles paving the floor. The white limestone walls reflect my video lights, making beautiful illumination. Cenotes were also believed to be entrances to the underworld--and therefore pathways to the Gods. In pre-Columbian times, the Maya people ruled Central America. They built staggering cities, which included massive step-pyramids as temples to the Maya gods. They performed rituals that they believed would keep the gods happy--to insure their good fortune. The Mayans would often throw offerings into the cenotes to please Chaac, the rain God. Sometimes those offerings included human sacrifices. We arrive at Cenote San Antonio. This tiny opening was once an important place to the Mayans. So important that we had to get a special permit to dive here. The walls are made of sedimentary rock formed from an ancient seabed. All kinds of shells are stuck in it, including this perfectly-formed sea urchin skeleton. As we drop further, I focus my camera on a jawbone. It’s the jaw of a horse, which probably fell in here by accident and drowned. Nothing can escape this watery trap. Near the jaw, I find my first trace of a human presence—a broken piece of pottery. I have to get my head around the fact that this is a pre-Columbian artifact more than a thousand years old. Moving away from the walls and out into the middle of the cenote, I find a bone. This is no horse bone—it’s a human tibia, the lower leg bone. And near it, the femur. Humans are buried here. Not far away, a ghostly sight—a human skull resting peacefully next to a perfectly intact earthen bowl. At this depth in fact there are human remains almost everywhere I turn. Of course we don’t touch or disturb anything. Not only is this a gravesite, it’s part of an ongoing archaeological study. We can look but we definitely cannot touch. Nearby, a jaw with molars that have cavities. What can be learned of the ancient Mayans from clues like this? But not everything down here is about death. This cenote has some of the most prolific cave fauna I have ever seen, including many blind cavefish and a species of cave isopod I have never seen before.
Views: 906127 BlueWorldTV
Stargate Blue Hole | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In a remote part of Andros Island in the Bahamas, a deep crack in the ground leads into a beautiful and stunning underwater cave system. Jonathan joins a veteran cave explorer to plumb the crystal clear water in the depths of Stargate Blue Hole. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** Most people, when they think about the Bahamas, imagine sandy beaches, blue water, and colorful coral reefs. What they generally don’t think about is this: limestone. The Bahamas are islands built on a base of limestone—the skeletons of ancient coral reefs accumulated over millions of years. Bahamas limestone often looks like Swiss Cheese, because over thousands of years, slightly acidic rainwater has dissolved holes in it. Sometimes those holes get quite large and fill with water. Hence, they become what are known in the Bahamas as Blue Holes. The Blue World team has traveled to the island of Andros in the Bahamas, to explore one of the most famous Blue Holes in the world: Stargate. Our home away from home? Small Hope Bay Lodge on North Andros. In spite of a strong breeze, flying is the only practical way to reach Stargate. The 25 minute flight takes Jeff and Tim over the beautiful and remote landscape and coastal ocean of Andros Island. Soon, they land on South Andros. At the Congo Town airport, they unload the scuba gear from the airplane. I’m not sure exactly what I was expecting, but Stargate turns out to be practically in the middle of a neighborhood near Congo Town! It even has a sign. Jeff is pointing out a crack in the limestone, sometimes called a fault or a fracture. It’s actually part of a series of fractures stretching more than ten miles, formed during the last ice age when sea levels were lower and stresses within the rock caused some of it to break. Deep underground, this fracture is filled with water. And we’re about to dive inside it! Lowering my expensive underwater camera and lighting system down into the water with a rope makes me a little nervous. Jeff leads us down into the weird, swirly halocline, a layer where the fresh water at the surface mixes with the salt water below. Jeff points out ancient coral, clearly identifiable. This is the stuff that makes up most of the limestone of the island. As I examine the limestone carefully, I can clearly see Star coral….and Brain coral. The overhanging walls of the cavern are covered in flowstone and stalactites. Todd backlights a stalactite to show its shape. Flowstone is a type of formation formed by flowing water in a dry cave, leaving behind delicate limestone formations that look like molten wax on the side of a candle. This formation took thousands of years to form. Looking down, I can see the bottom of the cave at 100 feet but as we progress down this narrow passageway, the bottom is dropping out of sight. It drops to 200 feet, way too deep for us today. We stay near the top of the passageway to keep as shallow as possible. The walls of the cave are decorated in all directions with beautiful and delicate flowstone. The whole place looks like an ornately decorated wedding cake covered in frosting! It’s hard to believe that during the last ice age, when sea levels were much lower, this massive chasm was dry and filled with air. Dripping water from rain up above made all these fantastic decorations. Next we swim into a huge space where the walls bow outward. The water is so clear that the divers look astronauts hovering in space. Only their bubbles betray the presence of water. Remember that crack in the ground up above? Well right now our dive team is about 120 feet directly underneath it. That tiny little fault line I stood across opens up into this massive submerged chasm! Soon we approach the end of the tunnel. We reach a place where rocks have fallen in and blocked the passageway. This is where we turn around and head back. This is an excellent time to concentrate on filming close-ups of the delicate formations on the wall, such as these exquisite stalactites that look like icicles of stone. Jeff points out an incredible flowstone formation that Todd helps me film using his lights. This formation is so thin, that light passes through it like a lampshade.
Views: 531559 BlueWorldTV
Sea Snakes | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Many people don't realize that there are snakes that live in the ocean. And believe it or not, they're actually considerably more venomous than land snakes! Jonathan travels to Australia and the Philippines to find these marine reptiles, and learns why they are almost completely harmless to divers. This is an HD upload of a segment previously released in season 3. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** The sea snake is an animal surrounded in mystery—known for its incredibly powerful venom, but not much else. Just how dangerous are these marine reptiles? I have traveled to Queensland, Australia on a quest to learn about sea snakes. Here on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, sea snakes are fairly common. Lets go see if we can find one. I hit the water, grab my camera and head towards the sea floor. Today I’m diving on a little seamount called a coral Bommie. It’s a mini-mountain of coral sticking up from the bottom, but not quite reaching the surface. Near the top of the Bommie, thousands of small fish feed on plankton passing by in the current, but they stay close to the reef, because they are being watched by a big school of jacks who are on the prowl for food themselves. The bommie is covered in healthy coral that provides lots of nooks and crannies for the fish to hide if they need cover. On the other side of the bommie, a large school of snappers are also looking for something to eat, and keeping a safe distance from the jacks. As I swim along at the base of the bommie, I’m keeping my eyes open for a snake-like animal. The coral looks healthy and a Spinecheek anemonefish gives me a quick glance from the safety of her host anemone. But I keep scanning the bottom and at last I have found my quarry: an olive sea snake, the most common species around the Great Barrier Reef. It’s swimming along the bottom doing the same thing everything else is doing—looking for food. The sea snake is closely related to a land snake, except it has adapted for life underwater. When a sea snake flicks its tongue, it’s getting rid of excess salt secreted by special glands in its mouth. Sea snakes live exclusively in the ocean, but since they’re reptiles, their kidneys can’t deal with too much excess salt in their blood. A sea snake gets around with a flattened section of tail that looks like an oar and serves as a fin. It looks just like an eel when it swims, undulating its body and getting propulsion from that flattened tail. Although sea snakes prefer to eat fish, eels and shrimp, these snappers aren’t at all afraid of the sea snake, because they are way too big for the sea snake to bite. This snake is heading for the surface to grab a breath of air. A sea snake, just like a land snake, has lungs and must breathe air to survive. It can hold its breath up to 3 hours during a dive. Recent research has shown that some sea snakes also can absorb a little bit of oxygen directly from the water through their skin, which is probably why a breath can last so long. After spending a minute at the surface breathing, the sea snake comes back down to the bottom. It’s poking around, looking for holes where it might corner a fish or shrimp. It sticks its head into the holes, hoping to get lucky. The sea snake is most closely related to the Cobra on land, and its venom is quite similar to cobra venom, but considerably more potent. If it manages to grab a fish, the venom will kill it in seconds. Sea snakes quite often take a rest on the bottom, sleeping as they hold their breath. I use the opportunity to sneak up on one. In spite of their fearsome venom, sea snakes are very timid and not particularly aggressive. Although this one is obviously not thrilled about being picked up, it doesn’t try to bite me. And when I let go, it just swims away. I find another one and can’t resist the opportunity to show the flattened tail section. Swim, be free! Although the sea snake is one of the most venomous animals in the world, you’re not very likely to be bitten by one. There are 62 known species of sea snakes and they live all around the tropical Indo-Pacific. I found this banded sea snake in the Philippines. They like nice warm tropical water because they are cold-blooded, like all reptiles. If the water gets too cold, they get lethargic. So, no matter what you might think of snakes, sea snakes are timid and shy animals that represent almost no threat at all to people, even though they produce some of the most powerful venom in the world.
Views: 6020452 BlueWorldTV
Oil Platform Diving! | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
09:45
In the Gulf of Mexico, Jonathan visits several oil rigs to scuba dive on the structure and learn how these offshore platforms attract marine life as artificial reefs. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program that airs on public television in the United States. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 522675 BlueWorldTV
Nature's Dive Bombers - Specialized Birds of Prey
 
01:52
With protective eyelids, webbed feet, and front-set eyes, gannets are well equipped for high-speed fishing. From: NATURE'S DIVE BOMBERS http://bit.ly/1n58t1J
Views: 21151 Smithsonian Channel
Aquarius Reef Base | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
17:13
Jonathan visits Aquarius Reef Base--the world's only undersea lab where scientists live in saturation for days or weeks at a time, studying the ocean. It's an amazing combination of science fiction and undersea adventure! This is an HD upload of a previously released segment. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 392027 BlueWorldTV
Florida Muck Diving | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
13:18
Diving around a sandy, muddy, or rubbly sea floor is often called "muck" diving--even though there is rarely any actual muck. There are all kinds of unique and interesting animals that live in this habitat. Jonathan joins muck expert Jeff Nelson to visit a world-renown muck diving site under the Blue Heron Bridge in Riviera Beach, Florida to find all kinds of weird and outlandish animals like sea horses, octopuses (octopods!), Batfish, snake eels, sea hares, and stingrays. But his main interest is finding a jawfish with eggs. You won't believe how the male jawfish guards his eggs! ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 3701354 BlueWorldTV
Defense In The Sea | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this webisode, Jonathan explores how animals in the ocean defend themselves using venom, spines, teeth, speed, maneuverability, ink and even a squirt gun! ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** This segment is an HD re-release of a previously released episode.
Views: 2349553 BlueWorldTV
Sea Snake Island | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
15:12
In this exciting adventure, Jonathan travels to Manuk, a tiny, uninhabited volcanic island several hundred miles from the nearest populated island in Indonesia, on a mission to discover why the waters of this remote place are teeming with thousands of venomous sea snakes! And if you love sea snakes, check out our adventure with sea snakes in Australia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gQY4m2HPYk ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** Some of the world’s richest coral reefs thrive in Indonesia. Located in the middle of the so-called coral triangle, the diversity of species and colors of Indonesian reefs absolutely amazes me every time I get the chance to dive here. This time however, it’s not the reefs I have come to film, but a remote and uninhabited island whose waters are reputed to teem with thousands of sea snakes! The island, known as Manuk, is an active volcano a hundred kilometers from the nearest inhabited island, smack dab in the middle of the Indonesian archipelago. Getting there is no easy task. I have chartered the Seahorse, a traditional Indonesian Pinisi built for divers, for a special itinerary to reach Manuk Island. Divemaster Jandri meets me at the marina in Sorong. It took me 2 full days of flying just to get to Sorong from the United States! He takes me out to the Seahorse, my home away from home for the next two weeks. This expedition will take 14 divers 1200 miles across the Banda Sea, from Sorong to Alor, stopping to dive along the way at many islands, the most important of which of course is Manuk. The island is aptly named: Manuk means “bird” in several Indonesian dialects. And birds it has! Manuk is completely uninhabited and there are a few reasons why. First of all, it’s kind of steep. But more importantly, it’s an active volcano! There are steam and sulfur vents all over the island. It swims casually by flapping its flattened, paddle-like section of tail. Sea snakes are among the most venomous animals on Earth. They use this venom to hunt, and fortunately, attacks on people are extremely rare. Soon I start to see other sea snakes, and I realize that more and more have been appearing. Were they here before and I didn’t see them, or did they come out from someplace? Clearly, some were sleeping. This one is taking a nap in plain view on the reef. I guess they don’t really have to worry about predators. I watch this one sleep for a little while, and start to wonder if it’s even alive. Pretty soon I notice that as the snakes are waking up, they are coming over to check me out. Like land snakes, this is how a sea snake “smells” but at the same time, the tongue flicking helps get rid of excess salt from glands in its mouth. Because sea snakes are reptiles just like land snakes, they have lungs and need to breathe air just like people. So a sea snake must head to the surface every once in a while for a breath. Sea snakes have a huge lung that takes up nearly the entire length of their bodies so they can hold a big breath that will last a while. Each time a sea snake surfaces, it usually spends a minute or two resting and breathing, before gulping in that last big breath and diving back down to the reef. A breath can last 1-2 hours depending on the species, but most sea snakes breathe more often than that unless they are sleeping. They can also absorb a little bit of oxygen from the water directly through their skin, which helps them extend their dives. The next morning I’m up at sunrise, and heading out to the reef for an early morning dive. Early morning is when the sea snakes hunt, and I’m hoping to witness the reef alive with sea snakes on the prowl! Underwater, the light levels are still low, and I’m heading out to a deep seamount where I saw a lot of sea snakes yesterday. This should be a good place to find some sea snakes hunting. When a sea snake hunts, it takes advantage of having a small head and a thin body to go from hole to hole in the reef, poking its head inside. It hopes to corner a fish or invertebrate that’s hiding in the hole. Once the hunting starts, more sea snakes start coming in to the reef to join the hunt. On this seamount more than a hundred feet from the surface, dozens of sea snakes are gathering to prowl the reef for food. Sometimes, they appear to work together to make sure nothing escapes.
Views: 3254238 BlueWorldTV
Crested Auklet seabird diving bird
 
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The crested auklet (Aethia cristatella) is a small seabird of the family Alcidae, distributed throughout the northern Pacific and the Bering Sea. The species feeds by diving in deep waters, eating krill and a variety of small marine animals. It nests in dense colonies of up to 1 million individuals in the Bering Sea and the Sea of Okhotsk. It often breeds in mixed-species colonies with the least auklet, a smaller congener. The species is known for its sexual ornaments, found in both males and females. These include colorful plumage with a forehead crest, a striking scent recalling citrus fruit, and a loud trumpet call, all of which appear to have evolved through sexual selection. The total population is around 6 million, almost half in North America
Views: 520 Kids Toys
Florida Cave Diving | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this northern Florida diving adventure, Jonathan teams up with cave diver Wayne Kinard and explores Ichetucknee Spring, otherwise known as "Jug Hole" in Fort White, Florida This is Jonathan's first real cave dive in Florida, and he learns how these caves are different from the caves in the Yucatan and Bahamas. It's an epic cave diving adventure! JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program that airs on public television in the United States. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 400302 BlueWorldTV
Tiny diving seabird
 
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Small diving seabird (15-17cm) seen from Horseshoe Park in Halifax, NS
Views: 127 chrisannad
Anemonefish and Clownfish: The Real Nemo (HD) | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
06:43
Thanks to the Disney/Pixar movie Finding Nemo, virtually everyone has heard of the clownfish. Jonathan travels the Pacific to investigate the behavior of real clownfish. Even though they don’t actually talk in real life, they are beautiful and fascinating fish to observe. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program that airs on public television in the United States. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** In the film Finding Nemo, an anemonefish plays the starring role. In real life, these little fish are a lot different from their Hollywood portrayal—I mean other than the fact that they don’t actually talk. But you may find these colorful little fish quite surprising. Join me on a dive to meet some real anemonefish! Anemonefish are found all over the tropical parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. They are quite common on coral reefs, so it wont take me too long to find one. Searching a reef on the Pacific Island of Yap, I soon come across a pair of Orange-fin Anemonefish, frolicking in an anemone that looks like a shag carpet. They are not afraid of me at all. I can swim right up and look them in the eye. There are 28 different species of anemonefish—all of which are very colorful, but the Clown anemonefish (sometimes called the clownfish) is probably the most beautiful. This is the species that was the basis for the character in Finding Nemo. Anemonefish get their name because they live in a toxic anemone. This lush carpet has venomous tentacles that sting most fish. But the anemonefish is covered in a special slimy mucous that keeps the anemone from stinging it. Because of this adaptation, the anemonefish can live, protected by the anemone, happily playing in the very tentacles that would kill other fish. Anemonefish are not the only animals that can live in the anemone. Cleaner shrimps hide here as well. They eat by cleaning the parasites from the fish, and in exchange for their services, the fish graciously don’t eat the shrimp. But it’s hard to relax when you are batted around by hyperactive anemonefish all day long! The protection afforded by the anemone is the reason why the anemonefish aren’t afraid of me. They know that the anemone’s stinging tentacles keep them safe. If another fish like this damselfish comes near the anemone, the anemonefish become territorial, and chase it away. They protect their anemone just as much as the anemone protects them, so it’s a good relationship. And if a fish gets too close, the anemone gets a meal—using its venomous tentacles to sting and disable the fish. This fish is lunch. The anemone might look like some kind of weird plant, but it’s actually a simple animal with a mouth in the middle. It’s basically a jellyfish that can’t swim. The anemone is a formidable allay to the anemonefish in more ways than one. They use the protection of the anemone to keep their eggs safe too. The female anemonefish deposits her eggs on the reef, under the edge of the anemone. Then her subservient males take over. The males provide all the egg care. The female just sits back and watches. In any group of anemonefish, there is always one anemonefish which is the largest. This is the dominant female. In anemonefish society, the females are the boss. One of the most interesting things about anemonefish is that they are all born male, but as they mature, some will completely transform into females! Only when the dominant female dies will the next male in line get the chance to transform into a female and become the head honcho. Until then, all the smaller anemonefish in the anemone are subservient males. Truth is stranger than fiction as it turns out, and as my dive comes to an end, I realize that anemonefish are even more fascinating than Hollywood would have us believe. The animals of the ocean truly are remarkable.
Views: 149514 BlueWorldTV
Terrifying Moment Seabird Dive-Bombs Tourist
 
00:50
An aggressive seagull in Mossel Bay, South Africa, tries to take a few bites out of an exuberant tourist's camera. The filmer plays the footage back in slow motion. It was captured in December 2018. This footage is being managed exclusively by Newsflare. To license this video email [email protected] or call: +44 (0) 203 937 6280 Subscribe to NewsflareBreaking: http://bit.ly/newsflare Connect with NewsflareBreaking Online: ▶Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Newsflare ▶Twitter https://twitter.com/Newsflare ▶Google+ http://bit.ly/NewsflareGoogle Register now to upload your videos and be notified of paid video assignments near you. → Visit www.newsflare.com to find out more.
Views: 1409 Newsflare
Sea Lions | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
13:21
In this intriguing segment, Jonathan goes diving with a group of playful sea lions in the Galapagos Islands. Impressed by the apparent inquisitiveness of the sea lions, Jonathan heads to the Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut where he learns how they train sea lions, and how smart they are. Jonathan finds out that the sea lions at Mystic know more than 100 commands, and he gets a lesson in sea lion training! This is an HD re-release of a segment originally produced for Season 3 and released on YouTube in 2012. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 104881 BlueWorldTV
Family Diving in Bonaire | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
19:49
With both of the kids now certified to dive, Jonathan and Christine take their whole family on a dive trip to Buddy Dive Resort on Bonaire. They go shore diving, boat diving and night diving. The kids build valuable scuba skills and they check out some awesome marine life! Buddy Dive http://www.buddydive.com/ Learn about Bonaire http://www.tourismbonaire.com/ JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure series featuring underwater cinematographer/naturalist Jonathan Bird. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 181421 BlueWorldTV
Night Diving with Sharks! | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
10:13
In this episode of Blue World, Jonathan and Cameraman Bill are night diving with sharks in the Bahamas! And just for added fun, we are taking the Brave Wilderness team with us! It's sharks after dark! And we witness a spectacular chase between a Lemon shark and a Southern Stingray. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure series featuring underwater cinematographer/naturalist Jonathan Bird. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 65877 BlueWorldTV
Jake Learns to Dive | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
16:49
Jake is a 13 year-old fan of Jonathan Bird's Blue World. Jake wrote an essay for school about his dream to dive with Jonathan, and the Blue World team is making it come true. The segment begins when Jonathan and his film crew make a surprise visit to Jake's house. Their mission? To get him certified to dive so he can go on a dive adventure with Jonathan. The segment concludes with Jonathan and Jake exploring the underwater world of Grand Cayman Island together! This is an HD upload of a previously released segment. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 1626760 BlueWorldTV
Megalodon Shark Tooth Diving! | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
20:17
Jonathan Bird goes to South Carolina with Cameraman Tim to meet Alan Devier, a world-renown shark tooth hunter and dive for fossilized Megalodon shark teeth in the murky depths of the Cooper River. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 366033 BlueWorldTV
Diving Mexico's Cenotes | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
11:56
Deep underneath Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, underground rivers wind their way to the sea. In some places, the forest floor has fallen in, leaving holes in the ground to access these mysterious underwater caves. The holes, called cenotes, were considered openings to the underworld by the ancient Mayans. Jonathan teams up with an expert cave diver to explore these spooky underground rivers. This is an HD re-release of a season 2 segment originally created in 2009. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 72787 BlueWorldTV
Northern Lobsters of Maine | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
11:30
In the north Atlantic, the American Lobster is the undisputed king of crustaceans. It's also a tremendously important commercial catch. While all the other fisheries are collapsing, why are lobsters resisting the trend? Jonathan goes out with a Maine lobsterman to learn why, and he dives down below to find the biggest lobsters he has ever seen. This segment won a New England Emmy Award! (This is an HD upload of the same segment posted previously in SD) ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** The American Lobster may not look all that tasty, but this large crustacean that was once considered a nuisance by catch is now considered a delicacy around the world. Although they are shipped to restaurants everywhere, they come from the cold waters of the North Atlantic, mostly from New England and Eastern Canada. I want to find a really big lobster, so I've come to Eastport, Maine, right on the Canadian border to hunt for a monster! I'm wearing my super warm drysuit, to search for lobsters in the cold 50-degree water. Lobsters hunt at night, so they like to hide in holes in the rocks during the day. This is what you normally see of a lobster during the day—just a couple of claws sticking out of its den. With some gentle prodding, the lobster will come out to defend its turf. Lobsters are extremely territorial and often fight each other for prime dens. I have to be very careful of the claws. If this lobster gets hold of my hand or fingers it can easily break them. Note that this lobster has a larger claw on the left side. This is called the crusher claw. The other is the pincher or ripping claw. The crusher claw tells us this lobster is left-handed…er---clawed. When a lobster gets this big, it demands respect! Maine is the lobster capital of the US, and Boothbay harbor is one of the most popular places to visit if you want a fresh lobster dinner. Outside MSA It’s also the home of the Maine State Aquarium, where I’m learning a little bit about the life cycle of lobsters. I’m venturing behind the scenes in the Bigelow Laboratory where they conduct research on lobsters. Researcher Aimee Hayden-Roderiques introduces me to some of the unusual lobsters in their collection. Now most lobsters are not red - that's the color they are when they're cooked. In the wild, lobsters are more this color, sort of an olive-y color, maybe with a little bit of green and some orange. Now, every once in awhile, however, you'll come across a lobster that looks like this. This blue coloration is an extremely rare pigmentation found one in every three million lobsters. And I have to say, they are cool! Now, if you want to talk about rare genetic variations, this one takes the cake. This one is called a bi-color lobster and you can see that the color is divided right down the middle, one side's blue and the other side's kind of a pale yellow. These bi-color lobsters are so rare only one in every 100 million of these are born this color. That is one rare lobster. This female lobster has something very special going on. If you look underneath her tail, it's full of eggs. The female incubates thousands of eggs under her tail for up to a year before they hatch, and then when it's time for them to hatch, she releases the eggs out into the water, they hatch with little larvae that swim off into the water to become planktonic lobsters. A few hundred years ago, lobsters were incredibly abundant. Back then, lobsters were considered cheap food for poor people. How times change! Lobstermen catch lobsters using a simple trap, the design of which hasn't changed much in a hundred years. The coast of Maine is ruggedly beautiful, but the inshore areas are a labyrinth of lobster buoys, each connected to one or more traps. Todd checks each trap for “keepers” - that is lobsters that are legal size and throws back the shorts and other by-catch like crabs. Because this is done by hand, none of the short lobsters or by-catch is harmed. In the next trap, Todd finds a female lobster with a notch in her tail. The V-notch was put here by a fellow lobsterman so that everyone will know she’s a good breeder, and let her go. This is how lobstermen protect the future of the industry by ensuring that there are always lots of egg-laying females out there. My time as an apprentice lobsterman taught me how hard these guys work for a living, and I also learned how efforts like V-notching have made lobstering one of the few fisheries that really makes an attempt to ensure the long-term viability of the species.
Views: 1066528 BlueWorldTV
Mysterious Crystal Caves of Abaco | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
15:10
In this spectacular episode, Jonathan joins world-renown cave explorer Brian Kakuk to investigate the Crystal Cave of Abaco, Bahamas--considered the most highly-ornamented underwater cave in the world! The stunning crystal formations in this cave are simply stunning! It is considered one of the top cave diving destinations in the world. There are no Megalodon sharks or monsters in this cave, but it's still one of the most amazing places I have ever seen! ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** For years I have heard about a remote cave in the Bahamas filled with incredibly fragile crystal formations. It has been compared to diving inside a chandelier. Only a handful of people have ever been into the so-called Crystal Cave, and I really want to see it. I contacted world-renown cave explorer Brian Kakuk who operates Bahamas Underground, a cave diving operation in remote Abaco, Bahamas where he explores caves, leads expeditions into the caves, and advocates for the protection of Bahamas caves. The Crystal Cave, also known as Ralph’s Cave, is way out in the pine forest, actually not very far from Dan’s Cave where I did my cave training. Brian is confident that the two caves actually connect, but he hasn’t found the connecting passageway yet. The opening to Crystal Cave has just a thin ceiling of limestone separating it from the forest above. Sidemount divers wear their tanks on their sides, so they have a thinner profile, and fit through smaller spaces. Today our entire team will be diving sidemount. Almost all the formations in Crystal Cave are in fact made of calcite crystal. In most caves, a fat stalagmite like this would be made of opaque white calcite, otherwise known as limestone. But here in Crystal Cave, it’s a translucent crystalline treasure that glows with Brian’s light. Nobody is quite sure why the calcite here forms crystals. Over the last hundred thousand years, this cave has alternated between submerged and dry at least five times. During an ice age when glaciers cover much of the world, sea levels fall and the Bahamas caves go dry. Water dripping in from above creates cave formations like stalactites and stalagmites. They can only form in a dry cave. With the Earth currently between ice ages, sea levels are high, and the caves are flooded, allowing us to swim from formation to formation. These formations, called draperies, are so thin that I can see Brian’s hand right through them! It’s like they are mode of frosted glass. Formed by thousands of years of dripping water, these exquisite crystal curtains are super fragile. Brian motions me over to a shelf to show me a thick layer of red dust. Tens of thousands of years ago, during a long dry spell, strong winds picked up iron-rich sand in the Sahara desert. The finest particles blew all the way across the Atlantic and landed in North America, especially the Bahamas. Rain eventually washed this dust down into the limestone where it formed a layer. The high iron-content makes it red like rust. The Sahara dust shows up in many of the cave formations as a red layer. Next Brian leads us to an area of crystal dripstone, where water was running gently along the floor. A bat skeleton, 15,000 years old, frozen permanently in crystal, like a bug in amber. Bats flew all the way in here back when it was dry. Not far from the bat, Brian directs me to this puzzling crystal formation. This was a pool in the floor of the cave, filled with mineral-rich water that grew huge crystals. The tiny stalactites from the top grew huge crystals when they reached the water surface. Crystals formed within the water grew towards the surface and spread out. Nearby, a smaller crystal pool, filled with smaller crystals that look like gemstones. As we push on, we finally reach the glass factory. It’s a room full of insanely delicate formations known as soda-straws, dripping from the ceiling. So why do they call these formations “soda straws?” Many of them really are hollow, like a straw. You could sip a beverage through this piece of fragile crystal! Up at the ceiling, some of the formations have formed offshoots, going sideways called helictites, and even experts in cave formations aren’t quite sure how they defy gravity when they form. The general consensus is that it’s a combination of wind and surface tension in the dripping water. So it’s possible that when this was a dry cave, there was a breeze through here.
Views: 313727 BlueWorldTV
Blue Caverns, Bird Rock, & Sea Fan Grotto, Catalina Island, CA Scuba Diving
 
06:05
Starts out with some darkness as we're in the cave. Afterwards you'll notice the excellent visibility that some estimated at 75+ feet. Not bad for an awesome day of fall diving in Southern California.
Views: 928 Edgar Sanchez
Sea Birds diving for Sardines
 
03:46
In Huntington Beach California. Sea Hawks, gulls, and other hurting birds dive for Sardines. There is an abundance of fish off the coast of California due to the warm waters of the Pacific Ocean. The warm water is a result of an El Niño condition. November 7, 2015.
Views: 143 Rommy Ardalan
Blue Hole Diving In The Bahamas | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
14:04
Jonathan travels to Andros, an island in the Bahamas, to investigate underwater caves that start in blue holes. A blue hole looks like a pond, but leads into a vast underwater cave system. In the Bahamas, these caves often lead to the ocean. As Jonathan explores the ocean end of the caves, he learns how the two systems are connected. JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/BlueWorldTV You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 42662 BlueWorldTV
Dive the Rock: Bird Cage on the Sea Wall
 
04:29
The dive site known as the "Bird Cage" on the sea wall is one of the most popular dive sites on Okinawa. But if it can be a little tricky to find if you've never been there before. For more on Okinawa diving, visit mccsmokinawa.com/TsunamiScuba look for us on Facebook, MCCS- Tsunami Scuba.
Views: 69 MCCSTVonOkinawa