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Funny English pronunciation / phonetics poem - 2OFUS2.com
 
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Poema interessante sobre as armadilhas de pronúncia na Língua Inglesa. Vídeo com legendas. Original em http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRe-j2EC1j8
Views: 5177 2ofus2et
Fun English Pronunciation Poem
 
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Views: 267 Shen
The Chaos Of English Pronunciation by Gerard Nolst Trenité
 
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This is different. Even a native English speaker has to find this interesting. English must be a very old language, because how else could one explain the random way we pronounce words? I guess the one good thing that has come out of the chaos: spelling bees! ;)
Views: 1342067 JimmmyJams
Cole Sprouse Recites Creepy Poetry He Wrote As a Child
 
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Cole Sprouse talks about how his Archie comics purity backfired on set, and recites a creepy poem he wrote to his mother as a child. » Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth » Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-seth-meyers/ » Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers Weeknights 12:35/11:35c on NBC. LATE NIGHT ON SOCIAL Follow Late Night on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LateNightSeth Like Late Night on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LateNightSeth Find Late Night on Tumblr: http://latenightseth.tumblr.com/ Connect with Late Night on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LateNightSeth/videos Late Night with Seth Meyers on YouTube features A-list celebrity guests, memorable comedy, and topical monologue jokes. NBC ON SOCIAL  Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC NBC Tumblr: http://NBCtv.tumblr.com/ NBC Pinterest: http://Pinterest.com/NBCtv/ NBC Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NBC YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/nbc NBC Instagram: http://instagram.com/nbctv Cole Sprouse Recites Creepy Poetry He Wrote As a Child- Late Night with Seth Meyers https://youtu.be/Zc4tcuG_1ZU Late Night with Seth Meyers http://www.youtube.com/user/latenightseth
Riverdale's Cole Sprouse & KJ Apa Compete in a Compliment Battle | Teen Vogue
 
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'Riverdale' stars Cole Sprouse and KJ Apa sit down to a romantic dinner and read beautiful, positive tweets to each other. Still haven’t subscribed to Teen Vogue on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/tvyoutubesub ABOUT TEEN VOGUE Fashion, beauty tips, celebrity style, pop culture, videos, and more—everything you need to be ahead of the trends. Fashion starts here. Riverdale's Cole Sprouse & KJ Apa Compete in a Compliment Battle | Teen Vogue
Views: 10105691 Teen Vogue
English Pronunciation Poem | The Chaos by Dr. Gerard Nolst
 
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http://www.pronunciationpro.com/youtube-free-trial/?keyword=EnglishPronunciationPoem=body If you are a nonnative English speaker then you know all too well that English pronunciation can be very confusing because of the overwhelming number of English exceptions to the rules. For example, why can’t you pronounce “mow” like you do in the word “cow”, or why do you sometimes pronounce “read” as “red”? English has many pronunciation exception to the rules. Learning the exceptions to the rules doubled with learning how to pronounce sounds in English can be exhausting. That’s why we have provided you with a little piece of American pronunciation help with this English pronunciation poem. I have recorded an audio recording of the abridged version of the famous English pronunciation poem (written by Gerard Nolst Trenité in 1922) so that nonnative English speakers can practice speaking along with me. As I always say: it’s not how it’s spelled that matters, it’s how it SOUNDS! THE CHAOS, BY GERARD NOLST Dearest creature in creation, Study English pronunciation. I will teach you in my verse, Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse. I will keep you, Suzy, busy, Make your head with heat grow dizzy. Tear in eye, your dress will tear. So shall I! Oh hear my prayer. Just compare heart, beard, and heard, Dies and diet, lord and word, Sword and sward, retain and Britain. (Mind the latter, how it’s written.) Now I surely will not plague you with such words as plaque and ague. But be careful how you speak: Say break and steak, but bleak and streak; Cloven, oven, how and low, Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe. Hear me say, devoid of trickery, Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore, Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles, Exiles, similes, and reviles; Scholar, vicar, and cigar, Solar, mica, war and far; One, anemone, Balmoral, Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel; Gertrude, German, wind and mind, Scene, Melpomene, mankind…. For the rest of the poem please click the link below: https://www.pronunciationpro.com/english-pronunciation/english-pronunciation-poem-exceptions-to-the-rules/ Note: the English accent you’ll hear is the Standard American English accent. I hope you enjoy this English pronunciation poem! Listen carefully to how I pronounce the words in this English pronunciation poem! The pronunciation in this English pronunciation poem is going to be very tricky! So listen carefully and repeat after me! And remember, have fun learning English! What other words have you noticed—when studying English—are pronounced differently than you expected? Let me know in the comments below! If you like what you heard (pronounced like “herd”), you can contact me through my website: http://www.pronunciationpro.com
Views: 39513 Pronunciation Pro
Learning English: "Ough" is tough to figure out
 
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There are various ways to pronounce "O-U-G-H" in the English language. This was hilariously demonstrated on the "I Love Lucy" television program by Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz) and his wife, Lucy. This funny clip sums up a challenging piece of the English language.
Views: 480101 Jv Myka
'The Chaos' - A poem about the difficulties of English pronunciation
 
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The Chaos by Gerard Nolst Trent Full online courses available at www.britishenglishpro.com Is English your second language? Check out our English community: www.englishlikeanative.me Here you will learn how to speak with a British English Accent. Check out some other helpful videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSB12yhjsVg Twitter: www.twitter.com/ElocutionOnline Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Elocution-Online/241809966008260
Views: 60847 British English Pro
Fun English Pronunciation Poem
 
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cherry v. cariazo (beed4-1 english 311)
Views: 29 cherry cariazo
The Chaos - A pronunciation poem
 
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English spelling and pronunciation don't necessarily connect. As is evidenced by G. Nolst Trenite's poem The Chaos. Here we set the iPhone's "speak selection" to a test by making it read the poem. You think it passes the test? This gets extra fun if you turn on the automatic captions. =)
Views: 481 Peter Strömberg
Funny English pronunciation
 
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Funny English pronunciation. This men try to learn how to pronounce well Like us Funny English pronunciation and share to helps this men ..
Views: 2025 Best Review
English Is Crazy!
 
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Seriously...the English language is insane. SUBSCRIBE! http://bit.ly/1eA5JCm Follow Me! http://bit.ly/15J7ube & http://bit.ly/18Lnfme Sources: Richard Lederer's "Crazy English" http://amzn.to/1pB5Rrj Richard Krogh's "The English Lesson" http://www.cupola.com/html/wordplay/english1.htm
Views: 1868046 Greg and Mitch
English Pronunciation - "The Chaos" by Dr. Gerard Nolst Trenité
 
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Subscribe to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/lindybeige?sub_confirmation=1 Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Lindybeige More poetry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzzh7AuEBkElcKTeIIXnQyGEtHMCjcKPk A recital of a poem by a man long-dead. I may not pronounce everything as he would have, but English is a rapidly-changing language. I have tended to go for correct but contrasting pronunciations where possible, for example the Book of Job in The Bible has 'Job' rhyme with 'globe'. Lindybeige: a channel of archaeology, ancient and medieval warfare, rants, poetry, swing dance, travelogues, evolution, and whatever else occurs to me to make. ▼ Follow me... Twitter: https://twitter.com/Lindybeige I may have some drivel to contribute to the Twittersphere, plus you get notice of uploads. Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/Lindybeige (it's a 'page' and now seems to be working). Google+: "google.com/+lindybeige" website: www.LloydianAspects.co.uk English Pronunciation - "The Chaos" by Dr. Gerard Nolst Trenité http://www.youtube.com/user/"Lindybeige"
Views: 1007443 Lindybeige
Pronunciation Poem
 
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Views: 292019 escodavi
Pronunciation poem
 
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This cute poem contains many words where English learners often make pronunciation mitakes. It's a great idea to learn to read the poem paying attention to the pronunciation. It'll help you avoid typical mistakes.
Views: 1710 Anna Breslavskaya
Pronunciation Poem
 
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Views: 233 Tariq Daudi
Phonics Song with TWO Words - A For Apple - ABC Alphabet Songs with Sounds for Children
 
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ABC "Phonics" song. This animated phonics song will help children learn the sounds of the letters in the English alphabets. This colorful phonics song also teaches two words per alphabet letter. Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/chuchutv Twitter - https://twitter.com/TheChuChuTV Google+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/112211188590597855240/posts =============================================== Video: Copyright 2017 ChuChu TV® Studios Music and Lyrics: Copyright 2017 ChuChu TV® Studios ChuChu TV ®, Cutians ®, all the characters and logos used are the registered trademarks of ChuChu TV Studios ===============================================
Fun English Pronunciation Poem
 
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Hope you like it!
PRONUNCIATION POEM MIKE MILLS ENGLISH
 
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Zapraszamy na http://www.mmenglish.com.pl/
The Most Difficult Pronunciation Poem In The World!
 
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SUBSCRIBE http://bit.ly/143yXED Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/LikeANativeSpeaker CafeTalk: http://bit.ly/1EQSxFZ This poem was made to show the craziness of English pronunciation and spelling. Make sure to watch with subtitles! Ian Schellenberg is an English teacher and teacher trainer in Vancouver, Canada with a passion for languages. He enjoys learning and teaching all of the fine nuances of any language. Ian is an expert in pronunciation and the history of English. Twitter: https://twitter.com/LikeNativeSpeak "Quasi Motion" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 3344 LikeANativeSpeaker
Difficult English Pronunciation Poem!
 
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Welcome to Free English Tips with Chris. Improve your English skills (IELTS, PTE or pronunciation) with Chris - an expert teacher. www.freeenglishtips.com
Views: 367 Free English
McWhine A lot  - English Pronunciation Poem
 
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Now you know. :D Obviously it is design to make you says the next word wrong, but it was funny to do. I believe that it actually has less to do with understanding the English language and more to do with the way the brain works and the shortcuts it takes in it's day to day operations.
Views: 57 Palora
Saoirse Ronan Tries To Teach Stephen An Irish Accent
 
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The star of Brooklyn gives Stephen a primer in speaking with an Irish brogue.
English Pronunciation Challenge: Reciting B Shaw's Poem
 
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Recorded my first 2 attempts at reciting the poem... Grr. It was frustrating! Makes me want to try again and again, but of course practice would make near perfect...and the fun is trying the very FIRST time anyway. *Do not judge my WI accent. Ha.* English Pronunciation by: George Bernard Shaw If you can pronounce correctly every word in this poem, you will be speaking English better than 90% of the native English speakers in the world. After trying them, a Frenchman said he'd prefer six months at hard labor to reading six lines aloud. Dearest creature in creation, Study English pronunciation. I will teach you in my verse Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse. I will keep you, Suzy, busy, Make your head with heat grow dizzy. Tear in eye, your dress will tear. So shall I! Oh hear my prayer. Just compare heart, beard, and heard, Dies and diet, lord and word, Sword and sward, retain and Britain. (Mind the latter, how it's written.) Now I surely will not plague you With such words as plaque and ague. But be careful how you speak: Say break and steak, but bleak and streak; Cloven, oven, how and low, Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe. Hear me say, devoid of trickery, Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore, Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles, Exiles, similes, and reviles; Scholar, vicar, and cigar, Solar, mica, war and far; One, anemone, Balmoral, Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel; Gertrude, German, wind and mind, Scene, Melpomene, mankind. Billet does not rhyme with ballet, Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet. Blood and flood are not like food, Nor is mould like should and would. Viscous, viscount, load and broad, Toward, to forward, to reward. And your pronunciation's OK When you correctly say croquet, Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve, Friend and fiend, alive and live. Ivy, privy, famous; clamour And enamour rhyme with hammer. River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb, Doll and roll and some and home. Stranger does not rhyme with anger, Neither does devour with clangour. Souls but foul, haunt but aunt, Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant, Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger, And then singer, ginger, linger, Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge, Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age. Query does not rhyme with very, Nor does fury sound like bury. Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth. Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath. Though the differences seem little, We say actual but victual. Refer does not rhyme with deafer. Foeffer does, and zephyr, heifer. Mint, pint, senate and sedate; Dull, bull, and George ate late. Scenic, Arabic, Pacific, Science, conscience, scientific. Liberty, library, heave and heaven, Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven. We say hallowed, but allowed, People, leopard, towed, but vowed. Mark the differences, moreover, Between mover, cover, clover; Leeches, breeches, wise, precise, Chalice, but police and lice; Camel, constable, unstable, Principle, disciple, label. Petal, panel, and canal, Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal. Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair, Senator, spectator, mayor. Tour, but our and succour, four. Gas, alas, and Arkansas. Sea, idea, Korea, area, Psalm, Maria, but malaria. Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean. Doctrine, turpentine, marine. Compare alien with Italian, Dandelion and battalion. Sally with ally, yea, ye, Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key. Say aver, but ever, fever, Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver. Heron, granary, canary. Crevice and device and aerie. Face, but preface, not efface. Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass. Large, but target, gin, give, verging, Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging. Ear, but earn and wear and tear Do not rhyme with here but ere. Seven is right, but so is even, Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen, Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk, Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work. Pronunciation (think of Psyche!) Is a paling stout and spikey? Won't it make you lose your wits, Writing groats and saying grits? It's a dark abyss or tunnel: Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale, Islington and Isle of Wight, Housewife, verdict and indict. Finally, which rhymes with enough, Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough? Hiccough has the sound of cup. My advice is to give up!!! -- B. Shaw
Views: 7448 sdeleeuw27
The Chaos. British English pronunciation poem
 
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Here's me speaking the Chaos poem. The ultimate English pronunciation challenge. Do you want to Speak Better English? Listen to a native speaker like me recite this poem and then try to copy my pronunciation and intonation, speaking it out loud yourself. If you want more help on how to speak better English then contact me or check out my courses on Udemy.
Views: 63 Colin Seaton
Pronunciation Poem
 
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Poem
Views: 3165 Jaakko Järvinen
English Pronunciation Poem
 
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I teach a special class on Saturday mornings to my Korean students. After some warm up activities and explanation of the right pronunciation of the words in the poem, they read it out loud. This is extremely difficult, even more so for second language speakers, but they did fantastically! I am very proud of them^^. English Pronunciation by G. Nolst Trenité Dearest creature in creation, Study English pronunciation. I will teach you in my verse Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse. I will keep you, Suzy, busy, Make your head with heat grow dizzy. Tear in eye, your dress will tear. So shall I! Oh hear my prayer. Just compare heart, beard, and heard, Dies and diet, lord and word, Sword and sward, retain and Britain. (Mind the latter, how it's written.) Now I surely will not plague you With such words as plaque and ague. But be careful how you speak: Say break and steak, but bleak and streak; Cloven, oven, how and low, Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe. Hear me say, devoid of trickery, Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore, Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles, Exiles, similes, and reviles; Scholar, vicar, and cigar, Solar, mica, war and far; One, anemone, Balmoral, Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel; Gertrude, German, wind and mind, Scene, Melpomene, mankind. Billet does not rhyme with ballet, Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet. Blood and flood are not like food, Nor is mould like should and would. Viscous, viscount, load and broad, Toward, to forward, to reward. And your pronunciation's OK When you correctly say croquet, Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve, Friend and fiend, alive and live. Ivy, privy, famous; clamour And enamour rhyme with hammer. River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb, Doll and roll and some and home. Stranger does not rhyme with anger, Neither does devour with clangour. Souls but foul, haunt but aunt, Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant, Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger, And then singer, ginger, linger, Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge, Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age. Query does not rhyme with very, Nor does fury sound like bury. Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth. Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath. Though the differences seem little, We say actual but victual. Refer does not rhyme with deafer. Fe0ffer does, and zephyr, heifer. Mint, pint, senate and sedate; Dull, bull, and George ate late. Scenic, Arabic, Pacific, Science, conscience, scientific. Liberty, library, heave and heaven, Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven. We say hallowed, but allowed, People, leopard, towed, but vowed. Mark the differences, moreover, Between mover, cover, clover; Leeches, breeches, wise, precise, Chalice, but police and lice; Camel, constable, unstable, Principle, disciple, label. Petal, panel, and canal, Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal. Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair, Senator, spectator, mayor. Tour, but our and succour, four. Gas, alas, and Arkansas. Sea, idea, Korea, area, Psalm, Maria, but malaria. Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean. Doctrine, turpentine, marine. Compare alien with Italian, Dandelion and battalion. Sally with ally, yea, ye, Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key. Say aver, but ever, fever, Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver. Heron, granary, canary. Crevice and device and aerie. Face, but preface, not efface. Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass. Large, but target, gin, give, verging, Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging. Ear, but earn and wear and tear Do not rhyme with here but ere. Seven is right, but so is even, Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen, Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk, Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work. Pronunciation (think of Psyche!) Is a paling stout and spikey? Won't it make you lose your wits, Writing groats and saying grits? It's a dark abyss or tunnel: Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale, Islington and Isle of Wight, Housewife, verdict and indict. Finally, which rhymes with enough, Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough? Hiccough has the sound of cup. My advice is to give up!!!
Views: 462 Marcelle Strydom
Learn English with a poem!
 
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Ready for a fun English lesson? Today I'll teach you English with a funny poem called "The Owl and the Pussycat"! I've chosen an easy poem and will read it with you one line at a time, so you can understand everything. You'll learn vocabulary and gain knowledge about British culture with this classic poem, written by Edward Lear in 1871. Reading poetry and immersing yourself in English culture is a great way to learn the language. So is taking the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-with-a-poem/ , and subscribing to my YouTube channel! TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today we're going to do something a little bit different. We're going to look at an English poem. And I know you're probably thinking: "Poetry, that's too difficult. English prose is hard enough, but poetry, ah no." But I'm hoping to make you realize that it is possible to read an English poem and to understand it. I've chosen quite an easy, straightforward one. It's called "The Owl and the Pussy-cat", which is in the first line, here. And it was written by a poet called Edward Lear. Edward Lear in 1871. Okay. And Edward Lear was well-known for his humorous writing, so a lot of his writing is funny, it makes you smile, it makes you laugh. So, hopefully this poem will do that for you. And so, it tells a story. It's in three sections. This is the first of three sections, and I'm just going to go through it with you and I will explain any words that I think maybe need explaining, and I hope you enjoy it. Okay? So, I'll read it. "The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea". Okay? Now, the Owl, do you know what an "owl" is? You probably know what a bird is. A bird that flies? Well, an owl is the kind of bird that is awake at night. It has big, round eyes. If you look it up on Google images, you'll see lots of pictures of owls. Okay? So we have a bird, here, an owl. And a pussy-cat. I'm sure you know what a cat is. We use the word "pussy-cat", it's a sort of a comic name or a... An affectionate name for a cat. People say: "Oh, puss, puss, puss. Here, pussy, pussy, pussy." So, it's a name for a cat. And children also say: "Oh, pussy-cat, pussy-cat". So, "pussy" is a cat, but here, it's being called "Pussy-cat" with a hyphen. So: "The Owl and the Pussy-cat", so we have a bird and a cat. Okay? Which usually, birds and cats don't usually make friends. Usually, the cat is going to attack the bird and kill it, probably. But in this poem, because it's Edward Lear and because he's being funny, he's put a bird and a cat together, and they're not just friends, but they're going on a journey together. They're on a trip together, so we'll see what happens, shall we? So: "The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea", on the sea. So even more dangerous. "Went to sea In a beautiful pea green boat". So, they're in a boat. You know the word "boat" on the sea. "Boat". It's "pea green". It's not just a green boat, it's the colour of a green pea, the vegetable that you eat. Little green peas. So it's pea green. We have all sorts of shades of green. Olive green, sage green, light green, dark green, pea green. So the boat is the colour of a green pea. No particular reason. It just... It just sort of fits for the rhythm, because rhythm is important. "In a beautiful pea green boat", something had to go in there. Okay, so what did they take with them? "They took some honey". You know honey? The sweet stuff that the bees go to flowers and then they make honey? Honey, it's like jam, only it's honey in a pot. Very sweet, you put it on the bread and eat it, or you put it in the pudding or something. "They took some honey, and plenty of money", well that was sensible. They're not very sensible, I don't think, going on to the sea in a boat, but at least they've been sensible enough to take some money with them. Okay, "plenty of money, Wrapped up in a five pound note." Okay. Well, here, this is a modern five pound note. It has the Queen on it. Okay? And some of the pictures on the back. Five pound note. But that's quite small compared with in 1871, a five pound note I think was a lot bigger than this, and it was a big white sheet of paper. So much easier to wrap other things in. You wouldn't be able to wrap much in this little thing. You can't buy much with this either these days. Anyway, ah: "They took some honey, and plenty of money, Wrapped up". Wrapped. So if you wrap something up, you put it inside, and you fold the pieces over and that's wrapped up. Okay? "Wrapped up in a five pound note." I just hope that the honey and the money didn't get all, eww, that would be horrible. I hope they managed to keep it separate. Anyway: "Wrapped up in a five pound note." Right. "The Owl looked up to the stars above", so it's nighttime and the stars are in the sky, little stars in the sky. Looking up at the sky is very romantic at night. "The Owl looked up to the stars above, And sang", a singing owl. You see? I told you it was funny.
The Chaos by G. Nolst Trenité - English Pronunciation Poem
 
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I, as many others before me, am attempting to read this beast of a poem by G. Nolst Trenité. I wanted to show people how even an English speaker can have problems with the language. I'm sure I even pronounced some wrong, looking back on it!
Views: 3977 Emily Lawrenson
Fun & Easy English with Poems: THE LIMERICK
 
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You might think poetry is difficult to understand, but think again! I will introduce you to the limerick. This short, funny form of poetry is a verse of five lines, in which some of the lines rhyme with each other. Watch the lesson, and you will learn about rhyme and rhythm. I’ll show you a few examples and explain the rules. The best part? The rules can be broken! I hope this will inspire you to write a limerick of your own. Try writing one in the comments. NEXT, watch this video about another poem: 1. Learn English with a poem: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVidL1o28gw 2. Learn to write poetry: THE HAIKU: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhIE4Dw6HKc TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today we have a lesson on a particular type of comic poem, which is called a limerick. Okay? So, these are some examples of limericks, and they're a very popular form of poem. They're usually very simple; they're not, like, difficult poetry that's hard to understand. They usually tell a story and it's usually quite funny; sometimes it's a bit crazy, kind of what you call nonsense poetry. It doesn't really make sense, but it's funny anyway. So, okay. So, to begin with the first example, it's a nursery rhyme, which is the kind of poem that children learn and listen to as they're children in the nursery where they're... When people used to have big houses, they would have one room which was called the nursery and they put their children in there, and they might have somebody to look after the children, like a nanny or a nurse. And... As well as the mother and father, the children would have other people to help to look after them and bring them up, and make food for them, and so on. That's if they were rich. But also children of all sorts. I remember, as a child, hearing nursery rhymes, and my mother especially telling me nursery rhymes. And the fun thing about them is that they have a rhythm and a rhyme, so there's a pattern, which children enjoy hearing the pattern of the rhythm and the rhyming of the ends of the lines. So, here's a nursery rhyme which you may have heard. Perhaps you have a version of it in your own language, if English isn't your first language. So, some of the words don't really make sense because they're more to do with imitating the sound of a clock ticking. So, here we go: Hickory dickory dock The mouse ran up the clock The clock struck one The mouse ran down Hickory dickory dock. So, it's... It's a clock, there's a mouse. The mouse goes up the clock, the clock chimes one: "Dong", and because of that, the mouse is frightened and runs down again. And then that's it - that's all that happens, but it's quite fun for children to hear that. So, you can see that there's a pattern, there: "dock" and "clock" rhyme, and then we have "dock" again. So, if we use a sort of letter form of rhyme scheme, you can label that A, like that. That's rhyme A. And then one is... Doesn't rhyme, so that's B. "One" and... Usually... Usually the third and fourth lines rhyme. These don't exactly rhyme, but they're a little bit similar. "One" and "down", and it's sort of what's called a half rhyme. So, it's a kind of... You could call it B again, really, or B with a little one on it just to show it's slightly different. But, anyway, this is... This sort of shows what the pattern is: A, A, B, B, A is the rhyme pattern for a limerick. And, also, the first two lines and the fifth lines are usually a bit longer than the lines three and four. So: "Hickory dickory dock, The mouse ran up the clock" so that's, like, three strong beats. "Hickory dickory dock, The mouse ran up the clock". But then we've got: "The clock struck one", so that's only two strong beats. "The clock struck one, The mouse ran down, Hickory dickory dock". So, it's that sort of rhythm; 3, 3, 2, 2, 3. So, that kind of pattern of rhythm and rhyme you find in most limericks. Okay? So, I hope you... I mean, "Hickory dickory dock", that's just imitating the sound of the clock. So, don't worry about: "What are those words? What do they mean?" They don't really mean anything, but the mouse-little animal-ran up the clock - it's a clock up on the wall, so... Or it's a clock... Big, tall clock that stands on the floor, so a mouse could run up it. "The clock struck one". "To strike"... "To strike" is when the clock chimes. To strike; to chime. If it goes: "Ding" or "Bong", anything like that, one sound to show that it's one o'clock; it just makes one single sound for one o'clock. "The clock struck one". Usually strikes because it's hitting something inside to make that sound. "The mouse ran down, Hickory dickory dock". So that's... That's it. Okay. So, that illustrates the pattern. And then we have an example from the 19th century. If you've seen another lesson that I did called: "The Owl and the Pussycat", you might remember the name of the poet, Edward Lear, who wrote a lot of funny poetry. […]
Pronunciation Poem
 
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My attempt at this poem: http://www.tickld.com/x/90-of-people-cant-pronounce-this-whole-poem, thanks to Jess. Now my brain hurts.
Views: 158 DramaBob
How to Pronounce Irish Names 🗣️👂🇮🇪☘️ (and other Irish words): A quick guide
 
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Seán, Niamh, Ciara, Oisín, Cathal... can you say these right? Maybe this video will help! It can seem daunting to meet someone whose name you've seen written down, but have no idea how its pronounced & this is especially true with Irish people. This is because a lot of our names are based on Irish orthography (spelling & pronunciation rules). Having a full understanding of this can take some getting used to, so instead of giving a thorough lesson, I decided to simplify things and give the most practical tips that work the majority of the time. I realize that I had to generalize and there are a few exceptions, but what I covered in this video will genuinely help you the vast majority of the time :) (I also referred to lenition, implying that it only happens with the letter 'h', but this ignores when it happens with a 't' at the start of words. I didn't bring that up in this video because making notes of all the little things like that would have made this much longer and the remaining rules don't apply as much to names) I hope I show in this video that it's really not that bad - Irish spelling is very consistent actually, especially when compared to English. If you keep the rules of thumb from the video in mind, you should find it much easier, whether you have Irish friends, or are learning the Irish language :) To prove the point, here is the video I mentioned near the end, where I read a ridiculous poem in English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-JDu3o7Cyw Otherwise, I referenced some other links, so be sure to check out my page on Irish resources here: https://www.fluentin3months.com/irish-learning-resources/ And here is a playlist of videos about learning Irish and videos that I've made IN Irish (with subtitles): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSQr1fqNSIPJcNw0OwoTZwn9_tf9VtafW Since a few people were asking, here's a link to the background music: https://audiojungle.net/item/long-way-from-home/20608935?ref=irishpolyglot I expect nitpicking in the comments because of things that aren't perfect (not possible to be thorough in a short video), but I hope some of you get genuine use out of this!! Enjoyed this video? Subscribe to my YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=irishpolyglot Watch me speak at TEDx: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0x2_kWRB8-A Follow Benny on Twitter: https://twitter.com/irishpolyglot Join thousands of language learners around the world at the Fluent in 3 Months Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/fluentin3months
Views: 1254653 Benny Lewis
English Pronunciation Poem
 
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I recite the extremely difficult English Pronunciation found at https://spelling.wordpress.com/2007/09/05/english-pronunciation/
Views: 1432 Jordon Brown
Poem pronunciation
 
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This is from the Webster's Dictionary app on how to pronounce "Poem."
Views: 25 MrMichael8806
English Pronunciation Poem with Audio
 
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American English Pronunciation Course: http://www.espressoenglish.net/american-english-pronunciation-course Free English Lessons: http://www.espressoenglish.net/english-tips-blog English pronunciation is crazy! If you had any doubt, this English pronunciation poem will show you several hundred English words that look the same, but are pronounced very differently. If you want an extra challenge, try reciting the poem after listening to the audio.
Views: 81800 Espresso English
Rupi Kaur Reads Timeless from Her Poetry Collection The Sun and Her Flowers
 
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Rupi Kaur details how she went from self-published student poet to the top of the New York Times best-seller list with fans like Sam Smith tattooing her artwork, plus she shares a poem from her second collection, The Sun and Her Flowers. Subscribe NOW to The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon: http://bit.ly/1nwT1aN Watch The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon Weeknights 11:35/10:35c Get more Jimmy Fallon: Follow Jimmy: http://Twitter.com/JimmyFallon Like Jimmy: https://Facebook.com/JimmyFallon Get more The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon: Follow The Tonight Show: http://Twitter.com/FallonTonight Like The Tonight Show: https://Facebook.com/FallonTonight The Tonight Show Tumblr: http://fallontonight.tumblr.com/ Get more NBC: NBC YouTube: http://bit.ly/1dM1qBH Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC NBC Tumblr: http://nbctv.tumblr.com/ NBC Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NBC/posts The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon features hilarious highlights from the show including: comedy sketches, music parodies, celebrity interviews, ridiculous games, and, of course, Jimmy's Thank You Notes and hashtags! You'll also find behind the scenes videos and other great web exclusives. Rupi Kaur Reads Timeless from Her Poetry Collection The Sun and Her Flowers http://www.youtube.com/fallontonight
Impossible Pronunciation Poem (with subs)
 
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Most native speakers get this wrong. Spelling English words and pronouncing them can be tough. You can do it though, and you'll get the knack for it. I get one word wrong, not the pronunciation, I just use the wrong word word. Can you tell which one?
Views: 213 Gavin Wilkinson
Poem Pronunciation ⚡️ How To Pronounce Poem!
 
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👂How to pronounce poem in this video! 🔔SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL: http://smarturl.it/subscribe-now In this video you can listen to how to pronounce poem. Do you want to improve your English pronunciation? Well, you've come to the right place. You can improve your English pronunciation with these videos and speak like a native. ✅Watch the pronunciation of poem immediately! ✳️ Twitter: https://twitter.com/LanguageATube ✳️ Watch all the videos on the "how to pronounce" playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwf56gky5sgeqFADgsGypPFtGF9aWPCkU ✳️ Watch previous video on the "how to pronounce" playlist: https://youtu.be/V1-NfdXjkGY
5 Tips for Poetry Performance: Doing Poetry Right with Renee M. LaTulippe
 
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Top 5 tips for performing poetry, presented by writer and speaker Renee M. LaTulippe. DOING POETRY RIGHT Top 5 Tips for Poetry Performance 1. Score Your Poem 2. Find Your Pace 3. Use Good Diction 4. Use Natural Movement 5. Be Natural and Have Fun Quick and easy tips to make your poetry performance or reading more natural and enjoyable for you and your audience. Poetry is for everyone - have fun with it! Renée LaTulippe is a former English/theater/public speaking teacher. She is now a children's writer who composes poems for her video blog, No Water River, where she also features videos of renowned children's poets reading their own work. Renée is also the editor at All About Learning Press, for whom she co-authors pre-reading books and early readers, including Lizard Lou: a collection of rhymes old and new, and blogs on language and grammar (often under the guise of her alter ego, the Chipmunk of Doom). Renée holds a BFA in acting/directing from Marymount Manhattan College and an MA in English Education from New York University. To find out more about Renée, see: Her children's poetry blog: http://www.nowaterriver.com/ Facebook author fan page: http://www.facebook.com/NoWaterRiver YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/NoWaterRiver Grammar blogger at All About Learning Press: http://blog.allaboutlearningpress.com/author/renee/ Editor website: http://www.wordsparkediting.com/ Twitter: @ReneeMLaTulippe To find out more about the DOING LIFE RIGHT TELECONFERENCE: http://www.doliferightinc.com/teleconference
Views: 292759 NoWaterRiver