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Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Data Analysis (Module 5)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 5. Bradley EH, Curry LA, Devers K. Qualitative data analysis for health services research: Developing taxonomy, themes, and theory. Health Services Research, 2007; 42(4):1758-1772. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 153524 YaleUniversity
Media Research : Statistics or Data Analysis and Interpretation
 
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This Lecture talks about Statistics or Data Analysis and Interpretation
Views: 1822 Cec Ugc
Analysis of Empirical research Data
 
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The Complete data Analysis of an Empirical research Data starting from questionnaire to final interpretation of the analysed data. very useful for writing Empirical research Articles. I have used Factor analysis and Amos to interpreted the mediation effect of variables.
Views: 812 My Easy Statistics
Interpreting Research
 
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Elisabet Tiselius, conference interpreter and PhD student in interpreting studies, gives an overview of interpreting research. She talks about the origins of research in interpreting, shows some models used to identify and map interpreting and shares some research secrets. For more information and list of references in the speech go to A WORD IN YOUR EAR: http://lourdesderioja.com/
Views: 2439 lourdes De Rioja
5 Basic (SPSS) Quantitative Data Analyses For Bachelor's Research
 
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1. Descriptives: 1:32 2. T test: 2:52 3. Correlation: 4:41 4. Chi square: 5:39 5. Linear regression: 6:45 This video discusses the basic statistical analytical procedures that are required for a typical bachelor's thesis. Five stats are highlighted here: descriptives, T test, correlation, Chi square, and linear regression. For requirements on reporting stats, please refer to the appendix of your research module manuals -- Frans Swint and I wrote an instructional text on APA reporting of stats. There is no upper limit in terms of how advanced your stats should be in your bachelor's dissertation. This video covers the basic procedures and is not meant to replace the instructions of your own research supervisor. Please consult your own research advisor for specific questions regarding your data analyses. Please LIKE this video if you enjoyed it. Otherwise, there is a thumb-down button, too... :P ▶ Please SUBSCRIBE to see new videos (almost) every week! ◀ ▼MY OTHER CHANNEL (MUSIC AND PIANO TUTORIALS)▼ https://www.youtube.com/ranywayz ▼MY SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES▼ https://www.facebook.com/ranywayz https://nl.linkedin.com/in/ranywayz https://www.twitter.com/ranywayz Animations are made with Sparkol. Music files retrieved from YouTube Audio Library. All images used in this video are free stock images or are available in the public domain. The views expressed in this video are my own and do not necessarily reflect the organizations with which I am affiliated. #RanywayzRandom #SPSS #Research
Views: 4191 Ranywayz Random
What is OPERATIONS RESEARCH? What does OPERATIONS RESEARCH mean? OPERATIONS RESEARCH meaning
 
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Do you travel a lot? Get yourself a mobile application to find THE CHEAPEST airline tickets deals available on the market: ANDROID - http://android.theaudiopedia.com - IPHONE - http://iphone.theaudiopedia.com or get BEST HOTEL DEALS worldwide: ANDROID - htttp://androidhotels.theaudiopedia.com - IPHONE - htttp://iphonehotels.theaudiopedia.com What is OPERATIONS RESEARCH? What does OPERATIONS RESEARCH mean? OPERATIONS RESEARCH meaning - OPERATIONS RESEARCH definition - OPERATIONS RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Operations research, or operational research in British usage, is a discipline that deals with the application of advanced analytical methods to help make better decisions. Further, the term 'operational analysis' is used in the British (and some British Commonwealth) military, as an intrinsic part of capability development, management and assurance. In particular, operational analysis forms part of the Combined Operational Effectiveness and Investment Appraisals (COEIA), which support British defence capability acquisition decision-making. It is often considered to be a sub-field of mathematics. The terms management science and decision science are sometimes used as synonyms. Employing techniques from other mathematical sciences, such as mathematical modeling, statistical analysis, and mathematical optimization, operations research arrives at optimal or near-optimal solutions to complex decision-making problems. Because of its emphasis on human-technology interaction and because of its focus on practical applications, operations research has overlap with other disciplines, notably industrial engineering and operations management, and draws on psychology and organization science. Operations research is often concerned with determining the maximum (of profit, performance, or yield) or minimum (of loss, risk, or cost) of some real-world objective. Originating in military efforts before World War II, its techniques have grown to concern problems in a variety of industries. Operational research (OR) encompasses a wide range of problem-solving techniques and methods applied in the pursuit of improved decision-making and efficiency, such as simulation, mathematical optimization, queueing theory and other stochastic-process models, Markov decision processes, econometric methods, data envelopment analysis, neural networks, expert systems, decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process. Nearly all of these techniques involve the construction of mathematical models that attempt to describe the system. Because of the computational and statistical nature of most of these fields, OR also has strong ties to computer science and analytics. Operational researchers faced with a new problem must determine which of these techniques are most appropriate given the nature of the system, the goals for improvement, and constraints on time and computing power. As a discipline, operational research originated in the efforts of military planners during World War I (convoy theory and Lanchester's laws). In the decades after the two world wars, the techniques were more widely applied to problems in business, industry and society. Since that time, operational research has expanded into a field widely used in industries ranging from petrochemicals to airlines, finance, logistics, and government, moving to a focus on the development of mathematical models that can be used to analyse and optimize complex systems, and has become an area of active academic and industrial research.
Views: 27414 The Audiopedia
3 Correlational Analysis - Writing Research Questions
 
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The correlational analysis video series is available for FREE as an iTune book for download on the iPad. The ISBN is 978-1-62847-042-6. The title is "Correlational Analysis". Waller and Lumadue are the authors. The iTune text provides accompanying narrative and the SPSS readouts used in the video series. The book can be accessed at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/correlational-analysis/id656763624?ls=1 This video examines the process for writing research questions for correlational analysis. Emphasis is also given to writing hypotheses and aligning questions, hypotheses, and methodology.
Views: 3797 Lee Rusty Waller
Analyzing Research Questionnaire using SPSS
 
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How to analyze a research questionnaire data that has been collected using SPSS. The proper techniques that are based on your research objectives and hypothesis are used. The analysis of the data is done by focusing on reliability of the questionnaire. Descriptive analysis, frequencies, correlation, factor analysis and regression analysis.
Views: 25120 Knowledge Abundance
Research Methods - Interpreting Inferential Statistics
 
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This A Level / IB Psychology revision video for Research Methods looks at interpreting inferential statistics.
Views: 20037 tutor2u
Significance and Meaning: Strategies for Analyzing and Interpreting Research Data
 
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Significance and Meaning introduces the concepts of correlation, causation, and probability.
Views: 1781 CHIP to CHIRP
Research Project: Data Analysis in SPSS
 
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Research Project: Data Analysis in SPSS
What is EMPIRICAL RESEARCH? What does EMPIRICAL RESEARCH mean? EMPIRICAL RESEARCH definition
 
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Do you travel a lot? Get yourself a mobile application to find THE CHEAPEST airline tickets deals available on the market: ANDROID - http://android.theaudiopedia.com - IPHONE - http://iphone.theaudiopedia.com or get BEST HOTEL DEALS worldwide: ANDROID - htttp://androidhotels.theaudiopedia.com - IPHONE - htttp://iphonehotels.theaudiopedia.com What is EMPIRICAL RESEARCH? What does EMPIRICAL RESEARCH mean? EMPIRICAL RESEARCH meaning - EMPIRICAL RESEARCH definition - EMPIRICAL RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Empirical research is research using empirical evidence. It is a way of gaining knowledge by means of direct and indirect observation or experience. Empiricism values such research more than other kinds. Empirical evidence (the record of one's direct observations or experiences) can be analyzed quantitatively or qualitatively. Through quantifying the evidence or making sense of it in qualitative form, a researcher can answer empirical questions, which should be clearly defined and answerable with the evidence collected (usually called data). Research design varies by field and by the question being investigated. Many researchers combine qualitative and quantitative forms of analysis to better answer questions which cannot be studied in laboratory settings, particularly in the social sciences and in education. In some fields, quantitative research may begin with a research question (e.g., "Does listening to vocal music during the learning of a word list have an effect on later memory for these words?") which is tested through experimentation. Usually, a researcher has a certain theory regarding the topic under investigation. Based on this theory some statements, or hypotheses, will be proposed (e.g., "Listening to vocal music has a negative effect on learning a word list."). From these hypotheses predictions about specific events are derived (e.g., "People who study a word list while listening to vocal music will remember fewer words on a later memory test than people who study a word list in silence."). These predictions can then be tested with a suitable experiment. Depending on the outcomes of the experiment, the theory on which the hypotheses and predictions were based will be supported or not, or may need to be modified and then subjected to further testing.
Views: 24578 The Audiopedia
What is UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH? What does UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH mean? UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH meaning
 
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What is UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH? What does UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH mean? UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH meaning - UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH definition - UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Unobtrusive research (or unobtrusive measures) is a method of data collection used primarily in the social sciences. The term "unobtrusive measures" was first coined by Webb, Campbell, Schwartz, & Sechrest in a 1966 book titled Unobtrusive Measures: nonreactive research in the social sciences. The authors described methodologies which do not involve direct elicitation of data from the research subjects. Unobtrusive measures are contrasted with interviews and questionnaires, in that they try to find indirect ways to obtain the necessary data. The unobtrusive approach often seeks unusual data sources, such as garbage, graffiti and obituaries, as well as more conventional ones such as published statistics. Unobtrusive measures should not be perceived as an alternative to more reactive methods such as interviews, surveys and experiments, but rather as an additional tool in the tool chest of the social researcher. Unobtrusive measures can assist in tackling known biases such as selection bias and experimenter's bias. Webb and his colleagues emphasize the importance of triangulating the results obtained through various methodologies, each with its own unique set of (usually unknown) biases. The proliferation of digital media opened a new era for communication researchers in search of unobtrusively obtained data sources. Online communication creates digital footprints that can allow an analysis of data that are obtained through unobtrusive methods, and are also massively larger than any corpora obtained via elicitation and human transcription. These footprints can now be used to analyze topics such as the content of communication events, the process of communication, and the structure of the communicative network. The surge of Internet-sourced research data rekindled the discussion of the ethical aspects of using unobtrusively obtained data. For example, can all data collected in the public domain be used for research purposes? When should we seek consent, and is it realistic to require informed consent from sources of unobtrusively collected data? These questions do not have a simple answer, and the solution is a result of a careful and ongoing dialog between researchers, and between researchers and society.
Views: 1261 The Audiopedia
Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation
 
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Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation- 073
Research Metholdology: Content Analysis
 
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This video is about Research Metholdology: Content Analysis
Views: 17109 Jessica Kager
Research Methodology Meaning Types Objectives [Hindi]
 
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Methodology is the systematic, theoretical analysis of the methods applied to a field of study. A research method is a systematic plan for conducting research. Sociologists draw on a variety of both qualitative and quantitative research methods, including experiments, survey research, participant observation, and secondary data.
Views: 130662 Manager Sahab
Analysing your Interviews
 
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This video is part of the University of Southampton, Southampton Education School, Digital Media Resources http://www.southampton.ac.uk/education http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~sesvideo/
Operations Research 05A: Sensitivity Analysis & Shadow Price
 
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Textbooks: https://amzn.to/2VgimyJ https://amzn.to/2CHalvx https://amzn.to/2Svk11k In this video, we'll talk about how to perform the sensitivity analysis and how to explain the shadow price for LP problems. ---------------------------------------- Smart Energy Operations Research Lab (SEORL): http://binghamton.edu/seorl YOUTUBE CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/yongtwang
Views: 86615 Yong Wang
LSE Research: Raising the Quality of Qualitative Analysis
 
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Kavita Abraham, of LSE's Methodology Institute, explains what happens if you get a computer program to analyse qualitative data. Qualitative data can provide a researcher with a lot of interesting information, but trying to interpret what it means can lead to methodological problems. Unlike a list of numbers, the meaning of a text is not something everyone will necessarily agree on. It's much easier for researcher bias to affect the interpretation, and it's often difficult to explicitly demonstrate how conclusions have been reached. But what if you could train a machine to do the analysis? In this short film Kavita Abraham of LSE's Methodology Institute explains how she has been using a software called Alceste to analyse the transcripts of interviews with hundreds of people from Angola, Tanzania, and Sierra Leone. The interviews, which explored perceptions of local governance, were conducted by the BBC World Service Trust, a charity that uses the power of the media to reduce poverty and promote human rights. Here Dr Abraham highlights some of the advantages of using a machine to study this kind of qualitative data.
Personality Analysis with Birth Date | Numero Grid Analysis | New Research in Numerology |
 
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किसी को देखे बिना उसके बारे में कैसे जाने ? How to tell about someone's intentions, desires, preferences, strengths, weaknesses & entire life graph without seeing them? Discover New Research in Numerology : Numerology Grid analysis technique for Personality Analysis with Birth Date. Based on Square Grid Theory : exclusive research work of Mr. Nitin Gupta that he shares in his famous Astro-Numerology workshop. Watch this excerpt from Numero Vibrations Course and start revealing the real personality traits of your friends. SUBSCRIBE US HERE : https://goo.gl/csENEN Contact NumeroVastu A-26, Pushpanjali Enclave, Pitampura, New Delhi. Call: +919999457329 Visit: www.numerovastu.in Like NumeroVastu Page on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/numerovastu/?ref=bookmarks
Views: 29213 Numero Vastu
What is ARCHIVAL RESEARCH? What does ARCHIVAL RESEARCH mean? ARCHIVAL RESEARCH meaning & explanation
 
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What is ARCHIVAL RESEARCH? What does ARCHIVAL RESEARCH mean? ARCHIVAL RESEARCH meaning - ARCHIVAL RESEARCH definition - ARCHIVAL RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Archival research is a type of primary research which involves seeking out and extracting evidence from original archival records. These records may be held either in institutional archive repositories, or in the custody of the organisation (whether a government body, business, family, or other agency) that originally generated or accumulated them, or in that of a successor body. Archival research can be contrasted with (1) secondary research (undertaken in a library or online), which involves identifying and consulting secondary sources relating to the topic of enquiry; and (2) with other types of primary research and empirical investigation such as fieldwork and experiment. Archival research is generally more complex and time-consuming than library and internet research, presenting challenges in identifying, locating and interpreting relevant documents. Archival records are often unique, and the researcher must be prepared to travel to reach them. Some finding aids to archival documents are hosted online, but many more are not, and some records lack any kind of finding aid at all. Although most archive repositories welcome researchers, and have professional staff tasked with assisting them, the sheer quantity of records means that finding aids may be of only limited usefulness: the researcher will need to hunt through large quantities of documents in search of material relevant to his or her particular enquiry. Some records may be closed to public access for reasons of confidentiality; and others may be written in archaic handwriting, in ancient or foreign languages, or in technical terminology. Archival documents were generally created for immediate practical or administrative purposes, not for the benefit of future researchers, and additional contextual research may be necessary to make sense of them. Many of these challenges are exacerbated when the records are still in the custody of the generating body or in private hands, where owners or custodians may be unwilling to provide access to external enquirers, and where finding aids may be even more rudimentary or non-existent. Archival research lies at the heart of most academic and other forms of original historical research; but it is frequently also undertaken (in conjunction with parallel research methodologies) in other disciplines within the humanities and social sciences, including literary studies, archaeology, sociology, human geography, anthropology, and psychology. It may also be important in other non-academic types of enquiry, such as the tracing of birth families by adoptees, and criminal investigations.
Views: 2172 The Audiopedia
Writing the Results Section for Research Papers
 
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The Results section of a scientific research paper represents the core findings of a study derived from the methods applied to gather and analyze information. It presents these findings in a logical sequence without bias or interpretation from the author, setting up the reader for later interpretation and evaluation in the Discussion section. This video explains what the purpose of the Results section is, what it includes, and how to structure and compose your study's findings in a research paper. Wordvice YouTube videos: "How to Write a Research Paper Introduction" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTC-5P1VFFU) "Which Verb Tenses to Use in a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcuL_IaRtXc) "How to Write an Abstract for a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMEnRBss6V4) "How to Write a Research Paper Title" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl1q-I3bE0c) Wordvice Resources Page "Useful Phrases for Academic Writing" (https://wordvice.com/useful-phrases-for-writing-academic-papers/) "Common Transition Terms in Academic Paper" (https://wordvice.com/common-transition-terms-used-in-academic-papers/) "Active and Passive Voice in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/video-should-i-use-active-or-passive-voice-in-a-research-paper/) "100+ Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing" (https://wordvice.com/recommended-verbs-for-research-writing/) "Tips for Paraphrasing in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/a-guide-to-paraphrasing-in-research-papers-apa-ama/) External Resources University of Minnesota. "Guidelines for Writing a Literature Review." (http://www.duluth.umn.edu/~hrallis/guides/researching/litreview.html) The UNC Writing Center. "Literature Reviews." (https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/literature-reviews/) Wordvice offers editing services in several languages and countries: ENGLISH: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
Correlational Research
 
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Psychologists often study the relationship between two variables. In this PSYCHademia episode I cover the correlational method. For students and teachers of AP Psychology, this episode aligns with Unit 2 Research Methods.
Views: 29170 PSYCHademia
Confirmatory Factor Analysis - Part 1 (Psychology, Statistics, Research Methods)
 
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In intelligence research, personality research and other research fields of psychology, factor analytic models are used to structurize the variables' jungle. For example: To simplify the variable structure of a personality questionnaire several questions (items), that are supposed to measure the same construct are grouped to one (latent) factor (e.g. extraversion). But does this group of items really measure extraversion? Maybe some of the items "load" on a different factor. And Maybe other aspects of the model have flaws as well... How well a factor model fits the data can be examined by a confirmatory factor analysis. Keywords: Confirmatory Factor Analysis - Factor Analysis - Psychology - Statistics - Research Methods - Personality Psychology - Extraversion - Conscientiousness - Openness - Neuroticism - Agreeableness - Five Factor Model - Big Five - Intelligence - Carroll
How to Read and Comprehend Scientific Research Articles
 
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This tutorial will discuss how to read a scientific article, how to find the main points of the article, and how to take effective notes.
Views: 92647 umnLibraries
What is COMPARATIVE RESEARCH? What does COMPARATIVE RESEARCH mean? COMPARATIVE RESEARCH meaning
 
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What is COMPARATIVE RESEARCH? What does COMPARATIVE RESEARCH mean? COMPARATIVE RESEARCH meaning - COMPARATIVE RESEARCH definition - COMPARATIVE RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures. A major problem in comparative research is that the data sets in different countries may not use the same categories, or define categories differently (for example by using different definitions of poverty). Comparative research, simply put, is the act of comparing two or more things with a view to discovering something about one or all of the things being compared. This technique often utilizes multiple disciplines in one study. When it comes to method, the majority agreement is that there is no methodology peculiar to comparative research. The multidisciplinary approach is good for the flexibility it offers, yet comparative programs do have a case to answer against the call that their research lacks a "seamless whole." There are certainly methods that are far more common than others in comparative studies, however. Quantitative analysis is much more frequently pursued than qualitative, and this is seen by the majority of comparative studies which use quantitative data. The general method of comparing things is the same for comparative research as it is in our everyday practice of comparison. Like cases are treated alike, and different cases are treated differently; the extent of difference determines how differently cases are to be treated. If one is able to sufficiently distinguish two carry the research conclusions will not be very helpful. Secondary analysis of quantitative data is relatively widespread in comparative research, undoubtedly in part because of the cost of obtaining primary data for such large things as a country's policy environment. This study is generally aggregate data analysis. Comparing large quantities of data (especially government sourced) is prevalent. A typical method of comparing welfare states is to take balance of their levels of spending on social welfare. In line with how a lot of theorizing has gone in the last century, comparative research does not tend to investigate "grand theories," such as Marxism. It instead occupies itself with middle-range theories that do not purport to describe our social system in its entirety, but a subset of it. A good example of this is the common research program that looks for differences between two or more social systems, then looks at these differences in relation to some other variable coexisting in those societies to see if it is related. The classic case of this is Esping-Andersen's research on social welfare systems. He noticed there was a difference in types of social welfare systems, and compared them based on their level of decommodification of social welfare goods. He found that he was able to class welfare states into three types, based on their level of decommodification. He further theorized from this that decommodification was based on a combination of class coalitions and mobilization, and regime legacy. Here, Esping-Andersen is using comparative research: he takes many western countries and compares their level of decommodification, then develops a theory of the divergence based on his findings. Comparative research can take many forms. Two key factors are space and time. Spatially, cross-national comparisons are by far the most common, although comparisons within countries, contrasting different areas, cultures or governments also subsist and are very constructive, especially in a country like New Zealand, where policy often changes depending on which race it pertains to. Recurrent interregional studies include comparing similar or different countries or sets of countries, comparing one's own country to others or to the whole world....
Views: 3657 The Audiopedia
Communication Research Methods - Discourse Analysis
 
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Introduction to Discourse Analysis Communication Research Methods Arkansas State University
Views: 9347 Dan's Academy
GIS in Public Health Research: Understanding Spatial Analysis & Interpreting Outcomes
 
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Geographic information systems (GIS) allow us to visualize data to better understand public health issues in our communities. Maps help recognize patterns for hypothesis generation; however, spatial analysis is necessary to substantiate relationships and produce meaningful outcomes. In this presentation we will discuss a few of the basic questions related to spatial analysis: ● How does spatial analysis differ from traditional statistical methods? ● What is the null hypothesis based on spatial randomization? ● Why do we need to look at permutations and spatial weights? ● What is the difference between global and local spatial autocorrelation? ● What does the z-score really mean? ● How do we integrate exploratory data analysis and exploratory spatial data analysis into our research? PowerPoint slides available at: http://hpaocec.uic.edu/gis-in-public-health.html Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/Dbin/
Views: 7649 UIC HPAOCEC
Factor Analysis - Factor Loading, Factor Scoring & Factor Rotation (Research & Statistics)
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this lecture explains factor analysis. Introduction to Factor Analysis: Factor Loading, Factor Scoring & Factor Rotation. NET Psychology postal course - https://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Psychology-Series.htm NET Psychology MCQs - https://www.doorsteptutor.com/Exams/UGC/Psychology/ IAS Psychology - https://www.examrace.com/IAS/IAS-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-IAS-Psychology-Series.htm IAS Psychology test series - https://www.doorsteptutor.com/Exams/IAS/Mains/Optional/Psychology/ Steps in Research Proposal @0:24 Research Topic @0:43 Review of Literature @0:56 Rationale and Need for the Study @1:18 Definition of Terms @1:24 Assumptions @3:03 Method, Sample and Tools @4:06 Probability Sampling @4:23 Non - Probability Sampling @4:34 Significance of Study @5:13 Technique for Data Analysis @5:18 Bibliography @5:42 Budget @6:28 Chapterisation @6:39 #Expenditure #Tabulate #Significance #Assumption #Literature #Rationale #Constitutive #Phenomena #Elucidate #Literature #Manishika #Examrace Factor Analysis and PCA Reduce large number of variables into fewer number of factors Co-variation is due to latent variable that exert casual influence on observed variables Communalities – each variable’s variance that can be explained by factors Types of Factoring • PCA – maximum variance for 1st factor; removes that and uses maximum for 2nd factor and so on… • Common Factor Analysis – Same as factor analysis (only common variance – used in CFA) • Image Factoring – correlation matrix; uses OLS regression matrix • Maximum Likelihood Method – on correlation matrix • Alpha Factoring • Weight Square Estimate communalities - each variable’s variance that can be explained by factor. See factors are retained Factor rotation - Procedure in which the eigenvectors (factors) are rotated in an attempt to achieve simple structure. Factor loading - Relation of each variable to the underlying factor. Output of a simple factor analysis looking at indicators of wealth, with just six variables and two resulting factors 6 variables: Income, education, occupation, house value, public parks and crimes 2 factors: individual socioeconomic status and neighborhood socioeconomic status Factor Score – if value of variables are given then factor values can be predicted Interpretation
Views: 4773 Examrace
Qualitative and Quantitative research in hindi  | HMI series
 
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For full course:https://goo.gl/J9Fgo7 HMI notes form : https://goo.gl/forms/W81y9DtAJGModoZF3 Topic wise: HMI(human machine interaction):https://goo.gl/bdZVyu 3 level of processing:https://goo.gl/YDyj1K Fundamental principle of interaction:https://goo.gl/xCqzoL Norman Seven stages of action : https://goo.gl/vdrVFC Human Centric Design : https://goo.gl/Pfikhf Goal directed Design : https://goo.gl/yUtifk Qualitative and Quantitative research:https://goo.gl/a3izUE Interview Techniques for Qualitative Research :https://goo.gl/AYQHhF Gestalt Principles : https://goo.gl/Jto36p GUI ( Graphical user interface ) Full concept : https://goo.gl/2oWqgN Advantages and Disadvantages of Graphical System (GUI) : https://goo.gl/HxiSjR Design an KIOSK:https://goo.gl/Z1eizX Design mobile app and portal sum:https://goo.gl/6nF3UK whatsapp: 7038604912
Views: 63751 Last moment tuitions
What is DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH? What does DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH mean? DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH meaning
 
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Do you travel a lot? Get yourself a mobile application to find THE CHEAPEST airline tickets deals available on the market: ANDROID - http://android.theaudiopedia.com - IPHONE - http://iphone.theaudiopedia.com or get BEST HOTEL DEALS worldwide: ANDROID - htttp://androidhotels.theaudiopedia.com - IPHONE - htttp://iphonehotels.theaudiopedia.com What is DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH? What does DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH mean? DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH meaning - DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH definition - DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Descriptive research is used to describe characteristics of a population or phenomenon being studied. It does not answer questions about how/when/why the characteristics occurred. Rather it addresses the "what" question (what are the characteristics of Minnesota state population or situation being studied?) The characteristics used to describe the situation or population are usually some kind of categorical scheme also known as descriptive categories. For example, the periodic table categorizes the elements. Scientists use knowledge about the nature of electrons, protons and neutrons to devise this categorical scheme. We now take for granted the periodic table, yet it took descriptive research to devise it. Descriptive research generally precedes explanatory research. For example, over time the periodic table’s description of the elements allowed scientists to explain chemical reaction and make sound prediction when elements were combined. Hence, descriptive research cannot describe what caused a situation. Thus, descriptive research cannot be used as the basis of a causal relationship, where one variable affects another. In other words, descriptive research can be said to have a low requirement for internal validity. The description is used for frequencies, averages and other statistical calculations. Often the best approach, prior to writing descriptive research, is to conduct a survey investigation. Qualitative research often has the aim of description and researchers may follow-up with examinations of why the observations exist and what the implications of the findings are.
Views: 19226 The Audiopedia
Choosing which statistical test to use - statistics help.
 
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Seven different statistical tests and a process by which you can decide which to use. The tests are: Test for a mean, test for a proportion, difference of proportions, difference of two means - independent samples, difference of two means - paired, chi-squared test for independence and regression. This video draws together videos about Helen, her brother, Luke and the choconutties. There is a sequel to give more practice choosing and illustrations of the different types of test with hypotheses.
Views: 713601 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
How to Know You Are Coding Correctly: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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Coding your qualitative data, whether that is interview transcripts, surveys, video, or photographs, is a subjective process. So how can you know when you are doing it well? We give you some basic tips.
SMART Financial Software: Stock-data for Market Analysis and Research Tools
 
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More details about SMART and short-term trading strategies based on corporate news interpretation can be found in the book (Amazon page: http://amzn.com/1475913605) : "Internet Stock Trading and Market Research for the Small Investor" by Paul Moubarak and Amy Steele.
Views: 5973 ANGELS
Clinical Research Statistics for Non-Statisticians
 
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Through real-world examples, webinar participants learn strategies for choosing appropriate outcome measures, methods for analysis and randomization, and sample sizes as well as tips for collecting the right data to answer your scientific questions.
Views: 8727 RhoInc1984
Qualitative Research Analyse
 
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Analyse an article where you point out how you determine the qualitative methodology used in the article. Qualitative and Quantitative Research Group 28 | UNAD University
Views: 44 Adriana Martinez
Data processing operation | Meaning | Steps of data processing | Production & Research |
 
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Data processing operation | Meaning | Steps of data processing | 1.) Editing 2.) Coding 3.) Classification 4.) Tabulation 5.) Diagram & chart
Views: 1188 Smart Education
NTA NET /JRF PAPER 1 TEACHING AND RESEARCH APTITUDE (Data Analysis and Interpretation)
 
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ILP INITIATIVE COPYRIGHT ATTAR SINGH SHARMA (A.S.S) SCIENCE FOUNDATION DELHI
Sampling & its 8 Types: Research Methodology
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this lecture explains the meaning of Sampling & Types of Sampling Research Methodology Population & Sample Systematic Sampling Cluster Sampling Non Probability Sampling Convenience Sampling Purposeful Sampling Extreme, Typical, Critical, or Deviant Case: Rare Intensity: Depicts interest strongly Maximum Variation: range of nationality, profession Homogeneous: similar sampling groups Stratified Purposeful: Across subcategories Mixed: Multistage which combines different sampling Sampling Politically Important Cases Purposeful Sampling Purposeful Random: If sample is larger than what can be handled & help to reduce sample size Opportunistic Sampling: Take advantage of new opportunity Confirming (support) and Disconfirming (against) Cases Theory Based or Operational Construct: interaction b/w human & environment Criterion: All above 6 feet tall Purposive: subset of large population – high level business Snowball Sample (Chain-Referral): picks sample analogous to accumulating snow Advantages of Sampling Increases validity of research Ability to generalize results to larger population Cuts the cost of data collection Allows speedy work with less effort Better organization Greater brevity Allows comprehensive and accurate data collection Reduces non sampling error. Sampling error is however added. Population & Sample @2:25 Sampling @6:30 Systematic Sampling @9:25 Cluster Sampling @ 11:22 Non Probability Sampling @13:10 Convenience Sampling @15:02 Purposeful Sampling @16:16 Advantages of Sampling @22:34 #Politically #Purposeful #Methodology #Systematic #Convenience #Probability #Cluster #Population #Research #Manishika #Examrace For IAS Psychology postal Course refer - http://www.examrace.com/IAS/IAS-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-IAS-Psychology-Series.htm For NET Paper 1 postal course visit - https://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Paper-I-Series.htm
Views: 317862 Examrace
3. Research and Stakeholder Analysis (Sample Lecture)
 
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MIT ESD.051J Engineering Innovation and Design, Fall 2012 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/ESD-051JF12 Instructor: Blade Kotelly, Joel Schindall Students continue to learn how to achieve good design with Dieter Rams' 10 Principles of Good Design. Students will also practice how to do a stakeholder analysis for a design project. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 12389 MIT OpenCourseWare
Research & Evaluation for Testing & Interpretation of Evidence in Publicly Funded Forensic Labs
 
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​This webinar provided details and guidance for potential applicants to NIJ’s solicitation, “Research and Evaluation for the Testing and Interpretation of Physical Evidence in Publicly Funded Forensic Laboratories.” The intent of this research and evaluation effort is to direct findings toward the forensic community, offering best practices for the most efficient, accurate, reliable, and cost-effective methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence in publicly funded crime laboratories. Through this work, we aim to have a direct and immediate impact on laboratory efficiency and assist in making laboratory policy decisions. (Opinions or points of view expressed represent the speaker and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice. Any product or manufacturer discussed is presented for informational purposes only and do not constitute product approval or endorsement by the U.S. Department of Justice.)
A* Sociology: How to analyse research methods
 
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How to show analysis in a research method questions. Some examples given. - Practical issues of documents - Ethical issues of covert research - Sample techniques Reference of analysis to the Napier Press: Sociology textbook. https://napierpress.com/ (Recorded with https://screencast-o-matic.com)
Views: 194 TheTEACHERSOCIOLOGY

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